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#121
br0adband

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You CAN move files, you just don't do it the same way as you do in Windows. Hold down the Command key while dragging and dropping a file.

http://www.apple.com...copydelete.html


Yanno, on countless OSX installs since I dropped .1 on the world has shown me that damned 'tip' is useless. I just tried it again on my current install I made just this morning, and Command+Drag simply does not move the file, nor does it 'copy and delete' the file either.

I was trying to move a dmg file from one directory to another, a simply move process, and I tried it nine ways from Sunday and it never "moved" the file, nor did it "copy and delete" the original to the new location.

In some respects, that is a MAJOR HASSLE to me considering (dare I say it) Windows moves files by default as long as they're on the same drive/partition. If you drag across drives/partitions, then it becomes a copy operation.

Having to hold a key on the keyboard to do something so completely basic to a disk and file based operating system is beyond annoying, it's just plain stupid to me (and many others I'm sure).

</rant off>

bb

#122
greenhorn

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Hi all ya,

I am new in here and I might stir up a hornet's nest with my opinions, but...

Some things people said in here tells me that they either have absolutely no clue on Computer-human interaction or should better stick with windows or both.

if i have to use the keyboard your gui royally sucks period

Sorry, but this is so untrue. First you don't have to use the keyboard in most cases. Second, it is widely accepted that using the keyboard is faster in many cases than hovering with the mouse. Especially the close/hide-thing that almost everyone seems to be anoyed of. Just use command+w to close a window, command-h to hide the app and command+q to close the app. And prove to me that using the mouse is faster.

I'll go into detail about why I think that {censored} is so ridiculous and stupid. It's about mouse mileage, or the need to move the mouse entirely too much to do the same particular function.

There's this idiotic thing called Fitt's Law that, well, to put it bluntly says (and I'm paraphrasing it in my own unique damned way):

Well, as I said, better go and learn something about computer-human-interaction, before whining about law's you don't understand.

Contrast that with something on OSX. If you have an application open like that you'll encounter a situation just like in Windows: every single application (for the most part) uses the same exact guidelines - except with OSX it means the menu/toolbar (and I know some apps break this guideline) is at the top of the screen, way up there, inches of mouse movement (typically based on the default mouse settings most people never change - hardcore people yes, regular Joe Schmoe consumers, no) and a helluva lot of screenspace covered.

As Johnny Cochrane was so fond of saying: "Does that make sense?"

Yep, it does definitely, and it is a far better solution than in Windows. Let me tell you why. On windows, you have to point the mouse directly to the menu-bar which my be anywhere on the screen, depeding on the size of the window. That means you have to point the mouse to a certain (not very tall position).
On OSX in contrary, you can just let the mouse fly up (which is insanely fast) and you know you will always end at the menu line. The point here is not the distance. Another proven fact is that this action does not take as long as it would using a menu on windows.

Besides, the law you where talking about does not only take the distance into account but also the size of objects. If there would be anything you could complain about than it would be that the close/hide-buttons in osx-windows might be a bit small.

I do use [url=http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/system_disk_utilities/wraparound.html]
[....]

It helps dramatically under OSX with the up-down-up-down Toolbar/Menubar to Dock movements since you can just move the pointer a slight bit at the top of the screen and voila, it's now resting on the Dock. Pretty slickz0re application and I can't recommend it enough.

You use something like the above mentioned program and whine about bad designed GUI-behaviour? Funny...

Besides, where's the difference to Windows? That the dock isn't the best thing regarding consistency and GUI-behaviour is quite clear, but is Windows better? I think not.

Because that's what your average Joe Schmoe does. In fact, the average Joe Schmoe computer owner is:

- a Windows user
- uses IE as his default browser

Well, I couldn't care less and I hope Apple don't.

Apple would end up creating a "Human Ocular-Controlled User Interface Guidelines"

One blink is a single click, a long blick is a double click, three quick blinks is click-drag, etc. :unsure: Hey, it could happen, and I'll bet someone is already looking that far ahead. But I mentioned it first!!! I want a cut!!!

Say, do you know anything about human subconscious behaviour (not sure if this is the right word as I am from Germany)? If so, you should know that blinking of an eye is (most of the time) something that is not controlled by the human. What I mean is, it would be extremely difficult to control such an interface because you simply can't control your eye-blinking for a a long time.

Oh, something I learned today that I simply did not know about the Dock usage: put the cursor on an icon, left click and hold the button, you get the menu. Hey, it was new to me when I discovered it in a book, I'm a Windows guy, we've had two very useful buttons for a long damned time now. Mighty Mouse... yeah right.

As others already said (others might have said it in a more gentle way, though): RTFM!
In other words: Don't blame Apple if you expect everything to work the way it did on another system and if you don't care at all for why or how Apple did OSX the way it is. I say it again: Sometimes there are good reasons for it.

#123
greenhorn

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Hi,

2) In Finder, the infos located in the bottom bar are pretty useless (i don't care about the remaining space when i'm inside a folder, i prefer having it when i click on a drive icon) so... let me, etc....

Why don't you just enable "show item info" in the in the "view/show view options"-menu?

Greetings,

Greenhorn

#124
zalg

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Why don't you just enable "show item info" in the in the "view/show view options"-menu?


I agreed with some of your points in the post before (even thought there was no reason to say it so harshly...) but I don't really agree with that....

Of course it's possible to do cmd option i to see the infos of the currently selected file(s)
But it takes too much space.... I think it would be much more useful just to have some real interesting infos in the bottom bar, like the size of the currently selected item(s) at least....

#125
bofors

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My chief annoyance is that without using a plug-in, Safari will not "Search In Google" in a new tab or new window, hence allowing you to get reference information about some text without losing your place on a page being studied.

I tend to hind all my open applications, when switching applications, I first hide the one open and then use the Application Switcher (Cmd - Tab). The annoyance is OS X will not let you hide the last application, one must alway be visible. This means that if I happen to have hid Finder, then I have to unhide to switch applications. I have not checked yet (because like to reinstall OS X frequently for extra security, so I keep the number of extra applications I use down to a minimum), but SwitchLight might actually solve this problem:

http://www.proteron.com/liteswitchx/

#126
VirtualGuitarist

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Why don't you just enable "show item info" in the in the "view/show view options"-menu?


Of course it's possible to do cmd option i to see the infos of the currently selected file(s)
But it takes too much space.... I think it would be much more useful just to have some real interesting infos in the bottom bar, like the size of the currently selected item(s) at least....


Hem... Greenhorn... i knew that since the begining. But when you have to examine hundreds of files, your 'cmd-i' is not as handy or useful as it should be. I completely agree with Zalg, and we should have a way to customize the infos that appears in the bottom bar.

Other VERY enervating anoyance is that when you select hundred files and do cmd-i, hundred info windows appear! :) Why not a unique window showing the total size of selected files, so that you can know wether they can fit on a cd?

And i would like to persist on my idea of info bubbles. I like the way that Linux handle them, and i'll love to see them in osx.

#127
velinn

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And i would like to persist on my idea of info bubbles. I like the way that Linux handle them, and i'll love to see them in osx.


Not to nitpick, but it isn't how "Linux" handles them, it's how KDE handles them. Personally I hate those big ugly tooltips in KDE, in fact, I hate most of the "features" in KDE. That is why I used Gnome. Gnome is a lot more elegant. Those huge ugly tooltips in KDE would look horrible in OS X. OS X is combination of elegance and usability; even if a big huge tooltip with file sizes and thumbnails provides the information you want, they would totally clash with the OS X environment.

That being said, I also dislike that multiple files open multiple Info windows. As a workaround, I copy files into their own directory and get the info on the directory itself rather than the individual files. It just takes a second or two more to copy files to a temp dir, but I agree that you shouldn't have to do that.

#128
Xenctuary

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As far as I can tell, attempting to "merge" two directories with the same name results in the newer data overwriting the entire folder. Unlike Windows, the individual files aren't just placed within it!

#129
deadlyhifi

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it really annoys me that when a dialogue box pops up (like Don't Save, Cancel, Save) that you can't switch between the options with the keyboard. In Dreamweaver the default option seems to be cancel but I most always want it to be 'Yes'.

I've tried the tab, the arrow keys, how do I do it? Oh wise ones, share your knowledgebases.

#130
greenhorn

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it really annoys me that when a dialogue box pops up (like Don't Save, Cancel, Save) that you can't switch between the options with the keyboard. In Dreamweaver the default option seems to be cancel but I most always want it to be 'Yes'.

I've tried the tab, the arrow keys, how do I do it? Oh wise ones, share your knowledgebases.

Hi,

in many cases, you can use the first letter of the option to choose it. In you example, try to press "d" to choose "don't save". Doesn't work in all apps, afaik.

#131
greenhorn

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Hi again,

for those of you who talked about the missing-slideshow-feature: Maybe "Picturepop Pro" could be something for you"...?

Sorry, forget something... :-)

If you're at it, take a look here: Introduction of some nice software-pieces now and then

http://www.macworld....eblogs/macgems/

#132
BugsB

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As far as I can tell, attempting to "merge" two directories with the same name results in the newer data overwriting the entire folder. Unlike Windows, the individual files aren't just placed within it!

Yes, that's a BIG one :) !! Please somebody fix that - that is definitely NOT a feature but a big friggin bug :D !!

#133
A Nonny Moose

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My chief annoyance is that without using a plug-in, Safari will not "Search In Google" in a new tab or new window, hence allowing you to get reference information about some text without losing your place on a page being studied.


Press command-enter after typing in your search.

#134
CSMatt

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My major Mac OS X annoyances:
  • There appears to be no way to permanently delete a file. I don’t use the Trash unless I have a reasonable doubt as to whether or not I should delete a file. If I’m confident that I will never need it again, I permanently delete it. Windows allowed this by using the shift+delete key combination. The seemingly equivalent command+delete does not work in the same way. Holding down command as I drag the file to the Trash doesn’t work either. This is a real problem for when I am deleting files from a removable drive. I like the fact that Mac OS X allows drives on which Mac OS X is not installed on to use the Trash by placing a “.Trashes” directory in the drive’s root, however such a directory should be created on a need-to-use basis. I tire of having to delete it every time I use the removable disk in a non-Mac OS X environment.
  • I want to be able to delete or securely delete only a select number of files from the Trash at a time. The Trash seems to only want you to be able to remove all of the files or none at all. I’ve had to drag files out to the desktop that I still wasn’t sure that I wanted deleted and empty the Trash with the remaining files being the ones I wanted to delete. Then, I have to drag the “rescued” files back into the trash again. There should really be a contextual menu option to delete an individual file or group of files in the Trash.
  • I have yet to see the ability to drag anything with the right mouse button. Any attempts to do so create the same result as just clicking with the right mouse button.
  • There is still no hibernation available in Mac OS X. Mac OS X is the only modern major operating system that I know of which offers a suspend/sleep ability but does not offer hibernation. Granted, Mac OS X seems to sleep and awake much better than these other systems, but that’s still no excuse for the lack of hibernation. One time, I left my iBook in sleep mode for weeks and came to find that the battery died and that I had lost everything in RAM. A hibernation mode would have prevented this.
I have others, but they have already been mentioned in some form in this topic.

My major Macintosh hardware annoyances (only semi-related but nonetheless important):
  • There needs to be a manual eject key for the optical drive. I have no idea why Apple is so ignorant as to that users want this kind of ability on their internal removable storage drives. Even the floppy drives didn’t have an eject button when they were offered. People had to drag the drive to the Trash every time. The eject key does not count, as it is recognized only by Mac OS X and Apple’s eject key driver for Windows XP. What if you want to eject the disc without being in the Mac OS operating system? The tray-loading iMac G3s had a manual eject key, so this proves that it won’t kill Apple to make one available. Anyone who owns one of the tray-loading Power Macs or the Mac Pro will be hit really hard by this inconvenience. Sure, there’s an eject key in the menu bar, but what if you are not running Mac OS X? How do you possibly expect to get the drive open, especially if there’s no disc inside? What if you have the duel-optical Power Mac G4 or the Mac Pro and want the slave drive to eject instead of the master one? Out of all of the hardware annoyances I mention here, this one needs to be addressed first; either make the eject keys recognizable by the EFI directly, or add a manual one that is recognized by the firmware of the optical drive. If there are two optical drives, add a manual eject key for each.
  • The external Apple keyboard is too sticky. The keys don’t stick down, but I find myself having to pound the thing to get the key to input. The problem seems to be pushing the key at a slight angle; if you don’t push it directly down, it will stick in the upright position. Of course, most of the time I am not aware of this until I look at what I’ve typed and notice that some words have missing letters. This might be because my only experience with them is using 6-month-old Apple keyboards on public access computers that have been worn down and have all sorts of crud in them, but I think that this applies to new keyboards as well.
  • Apple needs to offer a true two-button mouse. The 20-year dominance of the PC two-button mouse and the 10-year dominance of Windows has ensured that no one subconsciously pushes down both buttons at the same time when they mean to do something that only requires the left button. The only advantage of a one-button mouse is that left-handed users can just move the mouse to the other end of the keyboard and not have to manually switch the button assignments. The Mighty Mouse is not a two-button mouse; it is a one-button mouse that has the ability to sense the direction in which it is being pushed. It is thusly ineffective for gaming purposes where you might need to use both buttons at the same time. For example, if I’m in a first-person shooter and I am duel-wielding two guns, and each mouse button corresponds to the trigger for the gun on each respective side, I can’t use the Mighty Mouse to fire both weapons at the same time because of the Mighty Mouse’s one-button design.
  • There needs to be some easy way to turn off the startup chime that doesn’t involve manually muting the sound in Mac OS X. Even more annoying is that the desktop Macs seem to have built-in speakers that sound the chime through the speakers even when headphones are plugged in. This is very intrusive if I am working in a noise-sensitive environment.
  • The control, option, and shift keys on all Apple keyboards need their iconic equivalents on the face of the keys. Any moron can look at the corresponding shortcut next to a menu item with the clover in it and associate it with the “clover key,” but no one without experimentation or digging through manuals is going to know that the up arrow means “shift,” the carrot means “control” (this one is especially bothersome seeing as there is a carrot key on the keyboard), and the indescribable symbol means “option.” I’m not saying that the words should be removed, but the symbol equivalent should be present as well, much like how the small delete key on the external Apple keyboard is arranged. Likewise, the command key should say “command” somewhere on its face.
Also, someone mentioned that they wanted the ability to initiate the screen saver at will. Well, I have no idea how this got here, but the computers in the iMac computer lab I'm in right now have this seemingly-integrated ability through a lock in the menu bar. This might have something to do with the fact that everybody here access the computers with remote accounts, but I think this might be some sort of unlockable feature in Tiger.

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#135
Mofo-X

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It the same I way I miss the old window blinds feature from OS 9. double click the title bar and it folds up like a window shade.... not minimizes to the dock.


Greetings,

This was a feature I sorely missed, you can purchase WindowShade X from Unsanity.com and it adds window blind, minimize in place, trasnparent and stay on top features depending on ex command double clicking title bar.

Regards,

{censored}-x

#136
rogabean

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Greetings,

This was a feature I sorely missed, you can purchase WindowShade X from Unsanity.com and it adds window blind, minimize in place, trasnparent and stay on top features depending on ex command double clicking title bar.

Regards,

{censored}-x



cool. but I still think Apple should have this added to the window behavior preferences as an option to act like classic...

#137
A Nonny Moose

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There appears to be no way to permanently delete a file. I don’t use the Trash unless I have a reasonable doubt as to whether or not I should delete a file. If I’m confident that I will never need it again, I permanently delete it. Windows allowed this by using the shift+delete key combination. The seemingly equivalent command+delete does not work in the same way. Holding down command as I drag the file to the Trash doesn’t work either. This is a real problem for when I am deleting files from a removable drive. I like the fact that Mac OS X allows drives on which Mac OS X is not installed on to use the Trash by placing a “.Trashes” directory in the drive’s root, however such a directory should be created on a need-to-use basis. I tire of having to delete it every time I use the removable disk in a non-Mac OS X environment.


Yes there is, but it's a Terminal command. You can make an AppleScript to utilize this Terminal command and then delete at your leisure.

I want to be able to delete or securely delete only a select number of files from the Trash at a time. The Trash seems to only want you to be able to remove all of the files or none at all. I’ve had to drag files out to the desktop that I still wasn’t sure that I wanted deleted and empty the Trash with the remaining files being the ones I wanted to delete. Then, I have to drag the “rescued” files back into the trash again. There should really be a contextual menu option to delete an individual file or group of files in the Trash.


Lock the files before emptying the trash and it won't delete.

I have yet to see the ability to drag anything with the right mouse button. Any attempts to do so create the same result as just clicking with the right mouse button.


Can you explain why this is needed when you can do the same thing with the left mouse button???

There is still no hibernation available in Mac OS X. Mac OS X is the only modern major operating system that I know of which offers a suspend/sleep ability but does not offer hibernation. Granted, Mac OS X seems to sleep and awake much better than these other systems, but that’s still no excuse for the lack of hibernation. One time, I left my iBook in sleep mode for weeks and came to find that the battery died and that I had lost everything in RAM. A hibernation mode would have prevented this.


It exists



There needs to be a manual eject key for the optical drive. I have no idea why Apple is so ignorant as to that users want this kind of ability on their internal removable storage drives. Even the floppy drives didn’t have an eject button when they were offered. People had to drag the drive to the Trash every time. The eject key does not count, as it is recognized only by Mac OS X and Apple’s eject key driver for Windows XP. What if you want to eject the disc without being in the Mac OS operating system? The tray-loading iMac G3s had a manual eject key, so this proves that it won’t kill Apple to make one available. Anyone who owns one of the tray-loading Power Macs or the Mac Pro will be hit really hard by this inconvenience. Sure, there’s an eject key in the menu bar, but what if you are not running Mac OS X? How do you possibly expect to get the drive open, especially if there’s no disc inside? What if you have the duel-optical Power Mac G4 or the Mac Pro and want the slave drive to eject instead of the master one? Out of all of the hardware annoyances I mention here, this one needs to be addressed first; either make the eject keys recognizable by the EFI directly, or add a manual one that is recognized by the firmware of the optical drive. If there are two optical drives, add a manual eject key for each.


The only time this was really an issue was when Celine Dion destroyed the iMac G4's CD Drive (it actually had to be taken in for repairs because the DRM wouldn't allow it to eject). I've never had a problem with something not ejecting when I tell it to eject and there are tons of ways to eject a disk.

The external Apple keyboard is too sticky. The keys don’t stick down, but I find myself having to pound the thing to get the key to input. The problem seems to be pushing the key at a slight angle; if you don’t push it directly down, it will stick in the upright position. Of course, most of the time I am not aware of this until I look at what I’ve typed and notice that some words have missing letters. This might be because my only experience with them is using 6-month-old Apple keyboards on public access computers that have been worn down and have all sorts of crud in them, but I think that this applies to new keyboards as well.


It's the crud on the keyboard, because I've had the same problem.

]Apple needs to offer a true two-button mouse. The 20-year dominance of the PC two-button mouse and the 10-year dominance of Windows has ensured that no one subconsciously pushes down both buttons at the same time when they mean to do something that only requires the left button. The only advantage of a one-button mouse is that left-handed users can just move the mouse to the other end of the keyboard and not have to manually switch the button assignments. The Mighty Mouse is not a two-button mouse; it is a one-button mouse that has the ability to sense the direction in which it is being pushed. It is thusly ineffective for gaming purposes where you might need to use both buttons at the same time. For example, if I’m in a first-person shooter and I am duel-wielding two guns, and each mouse button corresponds to the trigger for the gun on each respective side, I can’t use the Mighty Mouse to fire both weapons at the same time because of the Mighty Mouse’s one-button design.


This is something I agree with you on. There needs to be a true two-button not mighty mouse.

There needs to be some easy way to turn off the startup chime that doesn’t involve manually muting the sound in Mac OS X. Even more annoying is that the desktop Macs seem to have built-in speakers that sound the chime through the speakers even when headphones are plugged in. This is very intrusive if I am working in a noise-sensitive environment.


True, but the startup bong is a hardware test. Not hearing it is a signal of something wrong. So it becomes a choice of whether or not you want to risk not knowing if something is wrong.

The control, option, and shift keys on all Apple keyboards need their iconic equivalents on the face of the keys. Any moron can look at the corresponding shortcut next to a menu item with the clover in it and associate it with the “clover key,” but no one without experimentation or digging through manuals is going to know that the up arrow means “shift,” the carrot means “control” (this one is especially bothersome seeing as there is a carrot key on the keyboard), and the indescribable symbol means “option.” I’m not saying that the words should be removed, but the symbol equivalent should be present as well, much like how the small delete key on the external Apple keyboard is arranged. Likewise, the command key should say “command” somewhere on its face.


This is a huge quirk for me too, but it also goes on Windows keyboards too. It seems more like a universal problem rather than something that is just an Apple issue. That being said, fingernail polish will fix that, as you can write on the keys with nail polish.

Also, someone mentioned that they wanted the ability to initiate the screen saver at will. Well, I have no idea how this got here, but the computers in the iMac computer lab I'm in right now have this seemingly-integrated ability through a lock in the menu bar. This might have something to do with the fact that everybody here access the computers with remote accounts, but I think this might be some sort of unlockable feature in Tiger.


That one is easy. You make a hot corner and move the mouse over there. Check out System Prefereces in the Screen Saver Pane. Then click on that hot corner button.

#138
jacksonblack

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it would be really nice to have a way to turn off that ugly drop shadow on the desktop icons' text. and maybe some other visual tweaks. a font smoothing tool that works as well as microsoft's cleartype tuner (i.e. makes text really readable, not just blurry) would also be something very much appreciated.

#139
CSMatt

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Yes there is, but it's a Terminal command. You can make an AppleScript to utilize this Terminal command and then delete at your leisure.

Since you claim to be "the God of AppleScript," would you mind making one for me? I rarely use Macs anymore ever since I had to get rid of the iBook and later drop out of the online math class that used the iMacs, but it would probably be benificial to others who have a similar frustration.

Lock the files before emptying the trash and it won't delete.

While that would also work, the process of locking and then unlocking the files is still just as tedious as moving them. I would still like to see someone design an application or an extension that would correct this.

Can you explain why this is needed when you can do the same thing with the left mouse button???

I suppose that this is one of those "Windows does this, so why doesn't Mac OS X?" claims, so it's not as important as some of the other things I have mentioned. Ever since Windows 95, dragging with the right mouse button always produced a list of choices after the drop (for files, it was move, copy, or create a shortcut). I'd just like to see something similar in Mac OS X, because it can be frustrating having to hold down keys to switch between copy and move. I'd also like to see a way to create an alias by dragging, if such a method doesn't already exist. Neither of these two issues personally bothers me very much, but it is still something I would like to see in the future.

It exists

So it does. This should have been an advertised improvement in the main page when it came out.

The only time this was really an issue was when Celine Dion destroyed the iMac G4's CD Drive (it actually had to be taken in for repairs because the DRM wouldn't allow it to eject). I've never had a problem with something not ejecting when I tell it to eject and there are tons of ways to eject a disk.

This is just one of my Macintosh "pet peeves." I just don't see why Apple insists on a software eject. Even so, kudos to Apple for using slot-loading CD drives, especially in their laptops.

It's the crud on the keyboard, because I've had the same problem.

That figures. If I ever buy an Apple keyboard, I'll be sure to buy a cover as well.

This is something I agree with you on. There needs to be a true two-button not mighty mouse.

At least this problem has a sensible solution; buy a third-party USB mouse. I've been able to find a functional one for my VAIO for $10. However, I have to hand it to Apple for their scroll ball; every wheel-based method of side scrolling is just inferior compared to it, even if the ball could be a little bigger.

True, but the startup bong is a hardware test. Not hearing it is a signal of something wrong. So it becomes a choice of whether or not you want to risk not knowing if something is wrong.

If the chime is muted, Apple could add an option that makes a sound if something is wrong. Because a hardware failure so rarely happens, I can live with a bothersome noise that indicates its presence as opposed to one that indicates a lack thereof. This same principle could be applied to PCs with internal speakers as well.

This is a huge quirk for me too, but it also goes on Windows keyboards too. It seems more like a universal problem rather than something that is just an Apple issue. That being said, fingernail polish will fix that, as you can write on the keys with nail polish.

It really should not be necessary to have to do that. Becides, usually the process of finding out the hard way what the symbols mean instills their key equivilants into the user's mind and renders the manual "tatooing" of the keys redundant.

On a related note. I really haven't come across this problem on PC keyboards. Care to explain this?

That one is easy. You make a hot corner and move the mouse over there. Check out System Prefereces in the Screen Saver Pane. Then click on that hot corner button.

True, but the lock-in-the-menubar method is easier and simpler. Too bad it only works for network users.

#140
velinn

velinn

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It exists

So it does. This should have been an advertised improvement in the main page when it came out.


Does this work for Hackintosh? I notice there are 'things that need to be run in Open Firmware at boot', but I don't know if that is an Apple specific hack, or if it's required by the OS for hibernation.





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