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Pattern of MLB (Main Logic Board)

ROM MLB Serial Number iMessage

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#1
holyfield

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Pattern of MLB (Main Logic Board) serial
 
Alert: If you are seeking for some quick single click iMessage fix, this is not about that at all.. This research digs a much deeper, it's about an aspect of building computer, which is able to run properly OS X. This post is purely educational. Understanding of this subject also requires knowledge of some basics of ICT. This topic isn't for sure for Windows dumb user, who wants some sort of OS X single click installations. For single click solutions buy a genuine Mac.
 
mac-logic-board-sample.jpg
 
Since Apple has made several changes on services, hardware identification becomes more and more important. For proper activation is needed a valid stable device. Device serial numbers, various hardware id's etc are part of identification and authentication. 
 
Just for clarity. Abbreviation MLB is shortened form of phrase Main Logic Board, which is a hardware part (motherboard).  Abbreviation MLB is used by custom comp builders community also as Serial ID of Main Logic Board, which is an identification code of single unique hardware part. In this post MLB can refer to both, serial id of main logic board or main logic board itself. So, pay attention to the context when your read this post.
 
MLB as hardware part id (barcode), is used by various services on OS X based comp, especially on Yosemite. So, you don't need only a good serial number in your SMBIOS settings, but also a good MLB, which matches logically (not by letter) your serial number. 
 
It's obvious at this point, that proper serial number isn't enough anymore. You need a good combination of serial number, MLB, etc. Those values should remain persistent. 
 
If someone told you, that MLB and serial number aren't related, you couldn't relay on this information, as MLB and serial number are logically related with each another. Probably I don't have to remind you - system serial number reveals your system model. Probably you haven't heard that MLB reveals exact model of your system Main Logic Board (hardware part) too
 
The Genesis of Apple computer ID's
 
You can think about Serial Number as an "external id" and MLB as an "internal id". Computers are built from inside out. For first main board, then other parts and finally gets boxed. Serial Number reveals entire product box (comp, device) sold to the customer, MLB reveals the main hardware part inside of this product. Serial Number and MLB are like two puzzle pieces from same unique puzzle. MLB tells even more about your hardware than a serial number. Mac device gets first the MLB id and later the Serial Number. So MLB is the primary identification for Mac hardware before it's assembled completely for selling!!!! Also Apple repair services have who forgot sometimes to burn Serial Number back to the new replacement logic board. Logic boards come from factory without Serial Number.
 
apple-serial-number-flasher.jpg
 
Below is the genesis of genuine Mac comp ID's.


Main Logic Board ID -> Serial Number

So, your MLB ID is born before the Serial Number! 

 
Based on that I recommend to start from generating system and hardware id's in this order:

  • MLB Serial
  • ROM/MAC address
  • System Serial

If you have chosen too complicated option for your system serial, you might have a trouble when generating properly matching MLB. 

Before you read forward, keep in mind, I'm not a hardware engineer, so I'm not familiar with all specifics related to computer hardware.
 
Pay attention - 2 different patterns!
 
General pattern for system serials (barcode) is the same:
 

Manufacturing location | Year | Week | Production number of given week | Model ID

 
Apple uses 2 different main patterns for serials (product serial, hardware part serial etc) now. Before Apple used 11 char serials for product and 13 char for MLB. Later Apple started to use a new standard to fit needs of increased production. Product serial length is 12 chars (Barcode Code 128) and MLB 17chars. Old serials have a bit common pattern for both, products and hardware parts and new ones have also a common pattern.
 
Below is the difference of 11 and 12 char system serials:

11 chrs serial: PPYWWSSSCCC
12 chrs serial: PPPYWSSSCCCC

MLB's pattern/length was also upgraded when system serials become updated. Thats why there are 13 and 17 char MLB's available.
 
For new pattern Apple has modified the "Y" component to include a letter code instead of a number, and the new system will reflect in that code not only the year of manufacture, but also whether it was manufactured in the first or second half of the year. The new week format utilizes one of 27 alphanumeric characters to denote the week of manufacture, beginning with 1-9 and moving on to letters, omitting 0, vowels A, E, I, O, and U, as well as B, S, and Z. Because the 27 possible characters can not account for all of the weeks in the year, the "W" component must be paired with the "Y" component to determine whether the machine was manufactured in the first or second half of the year, with the "W" codes recycling every six months. 
 
System serials and hardware ids are serving various logistical purposes (barcode). They should be easy to use by barcode reader and should be easy to decipher with simple regular expressions (regex). Its wise to use common general pattern everywhere. So, it's obvious that some pattern might occur for both, system serials and hardware part ids.
 
About 13 char MLB
 
Perhaps someone can complement my research about 13 char MLB. As you see below, there is a certain pattern hidden in MLB. I have found this pattern first  after examination of approx. 50 MLB's and is conformed by additional research later. Based on this pattern MLB is easily reversible. Name your MLB and I'm able to tell to you to which Mac model it belongs, where and when made, and so on. It's not a random string.
 

PPYWWSSSSCCCC

  • ID - Manufacturing location?  (Defined in Apple database,) 
  • Year of manufacturing: 2011
  • Week on manufacturing (01-52)
  • Production number, within this week (base-36???)
  • ID - Model of hardware part (Defined in Apple database)

Please note, it's easy interpret wrongly this pattern, as it has similarities with 11char serial.. Some are guessing that they can use serial number parts for MLB. It's not true. Manufacturing location and model id's aren't shared between serial number and MLB. Definitions in serial number aren't valid for MLB. Do not try to use serial number location or model ids for MLB, those aren't valid. MLB uses its own definitions.
 
If you have any additional or more adequate information about this pattern, please let me know!
 
 * * *
 
About 17char MLB's
 
17 char MLB is a bit harder to decipher. I have found this pattern after examination of approx. 10 MLB's. 
 
I suspect that Apple is using a new system for year and week identification for 17 char MLB. I guess that YW pattern occurs in 17char MLBs, but location is shifted and there is only one char used for week. 

 

PPPYWXXXXXXCCCCCC

 
I don't have enough data to decipher the 17char MLB pattern yet. You are welcome to help.
 
 * * *
 
Apple collects data about you and your hardware
 
Don't fool yourself! You need proper and matching hardware id's for your custom built comp. If you are trying to use any of Apple's online services, Apple collects some data about you and your hardware. You couldn't make a fake Apple ID as it goes trough credit card validation. So, banks are doing identifying of persons for Apple. Using someones credit card and personal data without a proper legal authorisation is criminal activity on most western countries.
 
For second, Apple collects data about you hardware. For example all your devices a listed on iCloud or on another appropriate support pages. Below is screenshot of iCloud Settings page, where all devices, from which you have accessed the service. On certain cases Apple checks for System Serial, on some cases for ROM/MLB pair etc. Your hardware should match on MLB and Serial Number to avoid any too obvious suspicious behaviour.

 

Attached File  find-my-devices-screen.jpg   33.17KB   295 downloads  Attached File  icloud-devices-list.jpg   71.46KB   244 downloads 
 
 
How to slice a MLB?
 
13 char MLB should be sliced as shown below.

XX X XX XXXX XXXX

The last part of 13 char MLB can be sliced additionally this way, where XXX is EEE code.

XXX X

.

 

17char (still a rough guess)

XXX X X XXXXXX XXXXXX

The last part of 17 char MLB can be sliced additionally this way, where XXXX is EEE code.

XXXX XX

You are welcome to support this research. Thank You!
 
 * * *
 
How to setup MLB
 
For first, pay attention: getting a good combination of serial, MLB and ROM etc is an exact science. Do not try to guess or randomly generate those values. Invalid values will cause a head-heck and if you are trying to use some Apple services, you get banned for those services soon or later, especially iMessage and FaceTime. Your system serial and MLB are sent to Apple! MLB and system serial should match logically. Do not contact Apple's support in any case, even if you have this kind alert. You are not eligible for Apple support with custom built computer.

 

mac-address-hack-screenshot-002.jpg
 
Please note also, you couldn't just  convert Serial Number into MLB. You can bake a MLB, but you couldn't convert Serial Number directly into MLB. Do not try. Similarity is confusing, MLB and serial number are sharing only overall barcode pattern. Serial number is good point from where to start, thats obvious, as MLB and serial should have logical match, but not match by letter. You couldn't use MacPro logic board on MacBook, it's obvious and super easy to check by Apple. So, pieces of puzzle should fit with each another.
 
I guess it's smart to use similar production time with system, just set MLB production time up to 6 months earlier of system production time. Production number is easy to calculate. Trickiest parts are the beginning and the end as there is no easily accessible public info avilable about these parts for MLB.

 

mlb-database-screenshot.png
 
The best option to inject proper values into your system, is to use Clover boot-loader, which injects all those values properly.
 
An option to setup MLB is to open your Clover configuration file with text editor and add/edit appropriate values. Second option is to use some GUI for editing Clover configuration file. Read Clover Wiki for more details. Below is an screenshot how to setup MLB with Clover Configurator.

  • Serial Number should be a good one to imitate Apple's hardware and also should be appropriate to your system.
  • MLB should be either 13 chars or 17 chars and match the appropriate pattern. Also hardware model info in MLB should be logically adequate to your system defined in Serial Number.
  • ROM part is defined in SmUUID and should be 12 chars  and match the Apple's MAC address standard, otherwise illegal. Do not use any random UUID generator for this purpose, for example uuidgen on Mac OS X. Validate your ROM part of SMUUID before usage with Apple ROM validator.

If motherboard manufacturer supports flashing comp MAC addresses, you can also try to rewrite original MAC addresses with valid Apple type MAC addresses. On this scenario value is taken directly from hardware. Flashing of MAC address is also the most bullet proof option to keep ROM value unchanged. Read about flashing on this post: Flashing Mac Address.
 
Important note. For Clover use for all values UPPER CASE letters. I got a huge head heck with iMessage/FaceTime by using lowercase values.
 
Note, If your serial is 11 chars, it's recommended to use 13 chars MLB. If you are using 12 chars Serial Number, you should use 17char MLB. It's not the 100% rule, but somewhere between 2007-2010 Apple started to use a new pattern for identification numbers (product serial, hardware serials etc).
 
hardware-uuid-rom-mlb-main-logic-board-c
 
 
iCloud / iMessage / FaceTime errors
 
Apple provides 44 different online services for his customers. Most of these require some sort of identification/authentication. Before signing into any Apple's services from custom built comp, think twice. And after that, think twice again! Are you Apple's customer at all? Do you have any genuine Apple device, which grants access to Apple's services? If yes, it's a bit up to you from where you access these services, from your custom built mac or from iDevice or from iCloud webpage etc. Whatever you do, do not attack Apple or anyone else!
 
NB! Most of iMessage Fixing guides available on Internet are invalid today. Be very careful!
 
If you got error shown below on your custom made comp, I do not recommend  contact Apple support.
 
apple-imessage-login-error.jpg

 

This error isn't authentication related at all! It's related to hardware identification, usually related to an invalid ROM/MLB combination.
 
Error shown above on custom made comp indicates usually that all of these ids or some of these are invalid: System Serial Number, Main Logic Board Serial (MLB), ROM. Apple is trying to protect users from spying/fraud etc. This error means that Apple suspects some sort of dangerous activity. So, they want to protect their customers privacy, etc.

 

To check that your Apple ID is fine: login into your comp as Guest and try to log in into iMessages. If you see something like below, it's 100% hardware identification issue.Your Apple ID is fine, but Apple doesn't like your hardware.

 

imessage-guest-account-login-chain-bad-h

 
Any custom comp builder, who is trying to access Apples services with invalid serial, MLB or ROM, gonna have some sort of trouble. Most of services require a valid system serial. System serial should match appropriate pattern. The same applies to MLB, which should match the MLB pattern. Some services require both, the proper MLB and ROM. If you have a good serial and proper MLB, you still might have trouble, if your ROM is invalid and doesn't match MAC address standards. Also you need properly configured network card. 
 
All those values should be persistent. Do not use any randomly generated values if you want access Apple's services. Same values should be injected on each reboot / wake.
 
Some users have tried to use genuine MLB/ROM values extracted from some another Mac. If you reuse these values, yo mightu put yourself into huge risk, which might end by terminating your Apples account. So be careful, do not steal those from someone.

 

A lot of users have followed misleading instructions by using random values. It's exact science how to generate those values. Several standards are involved into Serial Number, MLB and ROM generation. If you miss something, you have an invalid value, which is unable to bypass Apples validation. You need a good combination of MLB/ROM/serial, which doesn't violate related standards! Do your science, don't relay on guesswork. Building a custom built comp, which runs an OS X, is a branch of computer science, not a some kind dumb-users Windows installation.

Serial validation: genuine mac and self generated serial
 

Attached File  selfsolve-genuine.jpg   180.66KB   376 downloads  Attached File  selfsolve-invalid.jpg   95.28KB   269 downloads
 
Conclusion and alert
 
When you are building you own custom hardware based OS X comp, you have to generate a VALID COMBINATION of serial number, MLB, ROM etc. Hardware combination (system model and hardware part) should match in serial number and MLB. The best boot loader to get job done properly, to inject those values into OS X memory, is Clover. Forgot xBeast / Chimera installers. Do not use Chimera. Once again do not Chimera. TonyMac will sued soon by Apple too. Do not try to sign into any Apple's services before you have made a rock solid combination of serial number and hardware id's. 
 
MLB, ROM and Serial etc for your custom made comp should be globally unique values and match appropriate Apple's pattern. MLB and Serial should have logical match. Make sure that your system serial does not belong to anyone else! Those values should be used only in one single computer, nowhere else.
 
Do not share your comp serial numbers, hardware ID's etc with anyone who you don't trust 100%. Do not post it any public forum, blog etc. Don't share it with your friends, colleagues etc.
 
Some old news too
 
mac-news-89-mar.jpg
 
 
Thx!
 
I thank everybody who have helped me and still helping me on this research. Thank you for your contribution.

 

 

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#2
myedit001

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That means u like to say , we need at least one Genuine Apple machine to activate iMessage /Facetime  on hackintosh????

 

https://www.dropbox....yvti63x5/1?dl=1

 

https://www.dropbox....z1lgyj4g/2?dl=1

 

https://www.dropbox....er.app.zip?dl=1



#3
holyfield

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That means u like to say , we need at least one Genuine Apple machine to activate iMessage /Facetime  on hackintosh????


No! If you are genius enough to generate proper MLB, you should succeed. MLB is reversible like Serial Number. You can generate valid MLB like you do it for Serial Number.

 

Truth is, that several users have reported success (on various forums) by using MLB/ROM from genuine Mac, but some have failed too. But I don't know any details of these cases.

 

I personally don't recommend to use same MLB for various comps. But, based on this pattern you can lightly modify your genuine MLB, for example by changing the week and production number of this week (bigger number is recommended to avoid mismatch). Its wise to use adequate MLB, it's obvious that Mac Mini logic board isn't part of Mac Pro etc. Your system serial number and MLB are sent to Apple, so they can easily compare system and hardware part match if needed.



#4
spang1974

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if it helps:

 

Number of Bytes making up the MLB .... 17 
Number of Characters in the string .... 17
Your System Type .... iMac 12,1
Last four digits of OSX S/N .... DHJF
First five hex values of MLB .... 43 30 32 31 31 
First five string values of MLB ... C0211
Last three hex values of MLB .... 36 31 44
Last three string values of MLB ... 61D

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------

4D1EDE05-38C7-4A6A-9CC6-4BCCA8B38C14:MLB
------------------------------------------------------------------------------
000000: 43 30 32 31 31 xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx xx 36 31  |C0211xxxxxxxxx61|
000010: 44                                                                        |D|
 

 

Spang1974



#5
pkdesign

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I've seen differing advice. So you are saying that if I am using a definition from a Mac older than 2010, like MacPro3,1 (Early 2008 MacPro) then my MLB should only be 13 characters? The advice I've seen elsewhere always seems to say that it has to be 17 characters. Even Clover complains that my MLB is not 17 characters long in the boot log.

#6
holyfield

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I've seen differing advice. So you are saying that if I am using a definition from a Mac older than 2010, like MacPro3,1 (Early 2008 MacPro) then my MLB should only be 13 characters? The advice I've seen elsewhere always seems to say that it has to be 17 characters. Even Clover complains that my MLB is not 17 characters long in the boot log.

 

Where exactly did you see this advice? Who is the author of this advice? Please can you share the link?

 

There are a lot of myths available about Serial / MLB / ROM, especially in TonyAdolf forum. What I'm trying to do, is to demystify MLB. 



#7
pkdesign

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http://www.reddit.co...imessage_issue/

http://www.macbreake...problem-on.html

In Clover's own wiki:
http://clover-wiki.z...RtVariables#MLB

And yes, on TM site as well :-)

BTW I am using a 17 digit number based on the serial and 6 additional digits and Clover boot log is not complaining anymore. Haven't tried connecting to iMessage yet.

#8
holyfield

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And yes, on TM site as well :-)

BTW I am using a 17 digit number based on the serial and 6 additional digits and Clover boot log is not complaining anymore. Haven't tried connecting to iMessage yet.

 

All those links, which you have posted, doesn't refer  to any research/investigation about MLB. 

 

I suspect that there haven't been a proper knowledge about MLB available this far. A lot of half-truths and myths are available, based on various guesswork, success or failure. I'm not telling that I know exact truth. As you see, my research isn't complete yet. I don't have enough data to hack completely the MLB.

 

If you read my first post in this thread, you should notice, I'm not telling that you shall use only 13 char MLB. Length of MLB depends at production time of chosen model. You use for older Mac's 11 char serial and for new ones 12 char serial, the same applies to MLB.

 

I have investigated serials/mlbs etc of almost 50 genuine Macs. Most of them are older models. All older models have 11 char serial and 13 char MLB. But, for example some older comps which have been in Apple repair, have 17 char MLBs. Comps with 12 char serials have 17 char MLB. I haven't seen comp with 12 char serial with a 13 char MLB. Maybe it's possible, but I haven't seen. 

 

Anyone who have a genuine mac, is welcome to pm to me the model and length of serial and mlb, to demystify length issue.

 

But it's the fact that Apple has changed the pattern for serials and MLB's couple of years ago. So, it depends at model production year which type of MLB you shall use.  It's obvious that Apple is improving services validation methods. With simple reggex and logic you can easily validate MLB, like you do it for email, domain names etc, as it's based on standard.

 

But the length is the smallest issue, match of pattern should be your primary concern, whichever type of MLB you use. As you see, I don't know full pattern of 17 char MLB yet.

 

Re-read my first post.



#9
martin_weiss

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Interesting. I look forward to hearing about your findings, when you get the chance to dig deeper :)



#10
holyfield

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Interesting. I look forward to hearing about your findings, when you get the chance to dig deeper :)

 

You are welcome to help. If you have genuine mac, you are welcome to give some answers for few questions.



#11
pkdesign

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Thanks for all your hard work on this!

 

I'd like to understand more about how to convert a serial number into the MLB. For instance, a real serial number for a Mac Pro (Early 2008) is formatted exactly as you describe:

 

G8 - Country Code US

8 - Year of production

35 - Week of production

1FY - Production number

XYL - Product code (?, seems most are XYL or XYK)

 

My question is how to I convert that into the format for the MLB which uses 4 digits for Pproduction number and 4 digits for Product Code?



#12
holyfield

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Thanks for all your hard work on this!

 

I'd like to understand more about how to convert a serial number into the MLB. For instance, a real serial number for a Mac Pro (Early 2008) is formatted exactly as you describe:

 

G8 - Country Code US

8 - Year of production

35 - Week of production

1FY - Production number

XYL - Product code (?, seems most are XYL or XYK)

 

My question is how to I convert that into the format for the MLB which uses 4 digits for Pproduction number and 4 digits for Product Code?

 

You couldn't convert it into MLB. You can generate MLB, but you couldn't convert Serial Number into MLB. Do not try. Similarity is confusing,

MLB and serial are sharing only overall barcode pattern. Serial number is good point from where to start, thats obvious, as MLB and serial should have logical match, not match by letter. You couldn't use MacPro logic board on MacBook. So, pieces of puzzle should fit with each another.

 

I guess it's smart to use similar production time, set MLB production time up to 6 months earlier. Production number is easy to calculate. Trickiest parts are the beginning and the end as there is no public knowledge about these parts for MLB. 



#13
Kris404

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For a 13 character MLB, how do you calculate the last 4 characters (CCCC)?



#14
Pike R. Alpha

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The MLB can also be get from SMBIOS data and it looks like this: PPP Y WW TTT XX XX XXXX where TTT is board type.

 

MacPro6,1 has a SMC key called SMBR with the MLB (except the first character I think) but for other (newer) models it is set to all zero's (if available).

 

 

 

 



#15
Kris404

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Please explain the meaning of "calculate" in context of your question.


How do you generate CCCC from a valid Serial number?

#16
holyfield

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How do you generate CCCC from a valid Serial number?

 

I already answered to this question (asked by another user)



#17
pokenguyen

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Really nice, I removed all of the old methods and add the link to this awesome guide in my AIO guide:

http://www.insanelym...h/#entry2020598

 

Hope a easy solution for everyone will be discovered.



#18
holyfield

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Really nice, I removed all of the old methods and add the link to this awesome guide in my AIO guide:

http://www.insanelym...h/#entry2020598

 

Hope a easy solution for everyone will be discovered.

 

Welcome!



#19
Kris404

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I already answered to this question (asked by another user)

 

Thanks holyfied.

 

I'm not trying to generate an MLB from my serial number.

 

I have a valid Serial number for a valid system definition (iMac)

 

I have deciphered:

PPYWW - location, year & week of manufacture from my valid Serial number.

SSSS - I generated a base34 random number.

 

I'm stumped about what to use for CCCC that corresponds to the appropriate model identifier.



#20
pkdesign

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As I said, first and last part are tricky, which means, you couldn't use location directly from beginning of serial for MLB. You need a definitions database for these values. I got a hint already, there will be a MLB generator available soon too.

 

 

Why shouldn't you use the location from the serial number? Doesn't that indicate where the computer was built? Wouldn’t the motherboard have most likely been built there as well?








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