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Apple finally announces all-new Mac Pro

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The wait is finally over, Tim Cook made good on his promise of doing something special for the Mac Pro.

 

Apple today gave a sneak preview at WWDC of its all-new Mac Pro that its engineers are still working on, unveiling a relatively diminutive black cylinder form factor that is dwarfed by its outgoing predecessor.

 

Like the current Mac Pro, it's been designed around air flow, but with cool air being drawn in from underneath and hot air being expelled upwards, not too dissimilar from the ill-fated G4 Cube from 2000.

 

Indeed, it's in fact smaller in size than the PowerMac G4 Cube, at just 6.6" diameter and 9.9" tall, compared to the Cube which clocked in at 7.65" square, and 10" tall due to its elevation for air intake and cables into the bottom.

 

Based on the new-generation Intel Xeon E5 chipset, the new Mac Pro will pack 12 cores like the current model, but with PCI Express gen. 3 and 256-bit-wide floating-point instructions.

 

A first for any Mac are dual GPUs as standard, with the ability to power up to three 4K resolution monitors(!). Apple are hard at work on an updated version of Final Cut for video editors to take full advantage of this cutting-edge hardware. The GPUs are AMD FirePros with 6GB of VRAM.

 

Like with all current Apple hardware, the new Mac Pro does away with legacy technology such as optical drives and hard disk drives. Instead, storage is handled by next-generation PCIe flash storage.

 

Unsurprisingly, most of the size and weight loss is down to the removal of the PCI slots, meaning expansion is handled solely through the 6 Thunderbolt 2 ports (up to 20Gb/s) on the rear of the new Mac Pro - illuminated by white LEDs no less. Connectivity is rounded off with USB 3, Bluetooth 4.0, 801.11ac Wi-Fi, dual Gigabit ethernet and HDMI, plus audio I/O.

 

No word on an exact release date, which is no surprise given the uncharacteristic nature of this "preview", but one could hazard a guess that it may ship with the newly announced Mac OS X 10.9 "Mavericks". Will we finally see a black Apple mouse & keyboard to match the svelte gloss black gorgeousness of this new Mac Pro? Maybe even some high-end Retina Cinema Displays to boot? Place your bets now...

 

Head on over to Apple's new Mac Pro preview page on their website for more juicy pics and details.

 

Click here to view the article

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I strongly doubt many professionals are going to buy this toy.

Professionals are glad to buy new toys when it comes to their free time, but not for their actual job.

In this small town you'll still find most people in their offices using 10 years old hardware and Windows XP.

A friend of mine, a photographer, doesn't want to give up his dual core Power Mac G5.

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The cooling system is questionable. 12 core Xeon + 2xFirePro = at least 400 W thermal power on heavy load. Is this aluminium triangle with 17 sections capable enough to transfer so much heat and how is it possible to do so with aluminium radiator and "silent" turbine?...

No sure if it's a miracle or they are just stupid and cannot into physics. *phillip_fry_face.jpg*

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This. But in reverse.

So what you're saying is pcie cards do not use any cables?

Tell me, how do you connect a device to your pcie card?

 

I, for one think this is the right direction to go, but not with proprietary (thunderbolt) technology.

Well, we all know Apple just loves their own cables and connectors, so no wonder.

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While Thunderbolt is proprietary, it is still available for any Intel motherboard (not on low cost models, requires another chip) The problem is that it is only for Intel, AMD cannot use TB, which is sad.

 

And I think Apple isn't making much money from the cable, because third party cables cost almost the same (some even more)

 

I really hope to see Intel cheapen the technology enough to be included in mid range motherboards, and it would be awesome if they license the technology to AMD.

 

A man can dream...

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i think thay are missing a few things in the new mac pro evolvement

ie were as the consumer friendly  upgrade ability gone

like easy ram upgrades or changing the graphics card to Nvidia so you could use cuda

i just think  should have been kept in the new mac pro

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What if they sell the old model along the new one?

It is not their style. Plus their old model cannot be sold in the EU because it doesn't meet some specs.

I think with this new "Mac Pro" Apple put the final nail in the coffin of professional offerings. True professionals, people who work with their computers, want something practical, not a fashion statement.

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So what you're saying is pcie cards do not use any cables?

Tell me, how do you connect a device to your pcie card?

 

I, for one think this is the right direction to go, but not with proprietary (thunderbolt) technology.

Well, we all know Apple just loves their own cables and connectors, so no wonder.

You are correct - everything requires a cable of some sort - hell some require two! The difference here is that if I want to add more storage (SSD or HDD) those cables are inside the box, not on the outside. If I, for some crazy reason, want or need an optical drive, those cables are, again, on the inside of the box. It doesn't matter if I hook up my video cable to the DP/Thunderbolt or HDMI built in port or one on an add-on card - correct. It doesn't matter if I hook up my speakers to the built-in port or the add-on card. What does matter, which is what people are commenting about here, is the lack of any ability to put stuff into the machine that was an option before. A side effect of that is increased cables. Does that tell you how to connect a device to a PCIe card adequately enough?

 

Thunderbolt isn't any more proprietary than FireWire - I don't think that's the issue. Again, the issue is removing options. And its not like PCIe and SATA are outdated - Thunderbolt is built off of PCIe!

 

Something that has now been effectively lost, is an easy raid solution. Yeah, I can get an external RAID array for my Thunderbolt connector - but I cant RAID that funky little PCIe flash drive they got there. And please spare me the platitudes about the reliability - everything fails, its just a matter of time. Why offer ECC memory (memory that has built-in error correction) and not offer a way to provide similar protection for my non-volatile data storage? Perhaps some clever company will come up with an external RAID box that looks like a sandcrawler for the R2-D2 MacPro to get captured by.

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I think apple still the best. anyway he is getting worse. from ios7 to Mac Pro.

 

he is no more the undisputed leader of the branches. because he is loosing the innovation(for now).for example:

 

apple team (as me) has recognised a good design on the competitor software and has taken over.

the new Macpro has x79 socket, two years old, i think they are late.

the new maverick I don't know, but mountain lion is not snow leopard, that is clear.

this new Mac Pro is a revisit.

 

anyway they are the best, the design is the best, the software is very good (for consumer), the hardware is good, not so powerful, but good.

 

I mean what do you want? a trash is offensive! you people are using hackintosh! you like mac! if you don't like this stuff use windows!!! or fedora!! c'mon! somebody mounts hacks on acer laptops! this is very offensive!

apple put on the same level design hardware and software... and these tree points are inseparable.

so because apple is strightly related to design he tries always to simplify removing unused stuff like pci! that i think is useless for the 99%.. and bacause apple is related to design since ever you can't analyze his choice. you don't have the knowledge.

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I think apple still the best. anyway he is getting worse. from ios7 to Mac Pro.

 

he is no more the undisputed leader of the branches. because he is loosing the innovation(for now).for example:

 

apple team (as me) has recognised a good design on the competitor software and has taken over.

the new Macpro has x79 socket, two years old, i think they are late.

the new maverick I don't know, but mountain lion is not snow leopard, that is clear.

this new Mac Pro is a revisit.

 

anyway they are the best, the design is the best, the software is very good (for consumer), the hardware is good, not so powerful, but good.

 

I mean what do you want? a trash is offensive! you people are using hackintosh! you like mac! if you don't like this stuff use windows!!! or fedora!! c'mon! somebody mounts hacks on acer laptops! this is very offensive!

apple put on the same level design hardware and software... and these tree points are inseparable.

so because apple is strightly related to design he tries always to simplify removing unused stuff like pci! that i think is useless for the 99%.. and bacause apple is related to design since ever you can't analyze his choice. you don't have the knowledge.

 

We like OSX - if we were all dedicated fan-boys, we would only have Apple 'branded' products (in quotes because I could kinda brand my hackintosh with an Apple sticker - sorta). We also like choice. That is why people try to get 10.8.4 running on AMD chips and nVidia 690 GPUs and hybrid SSD/HDD storage - because we like choice and we like a good challenge!

 

I think we have every right to analyze his (assume you mean either Tim Cook, or an Italian translation issue from personal possessive noun to possessive pronoun) / Apple's decisions, as we are the consumers. For an oversimplified example I shall use the evil empire that is Starbucks. If I bought a tall half-skinny half-1 percent extra hot split quad shot (two shots decaf, two shots regular) latte with whip, and then suddenly Starbucks says "We just improved our menu and 1 percent is no longer an option, only skinny. Now it could be argued that this may even be in my best interest as skim has no fat whereas 1 percent does have some fat. The point is that they used to offer this option - I'm not sure how many people used it because I am not privy to Starbucks inventory control system, but it was an option. I now have a choice - I can continue to get my snobbish coffee from Starbucks, I can go to Dunkin' Donuts (Microsoft OS and Dell/HP/Bob's Pretty Good Computer Company in this analogy), or I can go to my local Aldi and get some beans and roast that up myself! (for those not following along, that is the hackintosh in this analogy) I can also tell my friends and neighbors that I don't like Starbucks anymore because of their change and then engage them in debate about said change. Ultimately, people will analyze this decision with their wallets. That is the most awesome part about capitalism. Don't get me started about the crappy parts....

 

And, as for me, I try to stay away from making statements like "____ is the best" because "best" is subjective. The best part of waking up, for me, is not Foldgers in my cup. however, claiming somethings is the best has its advantages for marketing - "This is the best MacPro to date" Anyone can say that, and even Apple can print it if they so choose - but what is "best"? For me best is power and flexibility in a decent looking box. For others, its having a shiny slab they can carry around in their pocket and occasionally ask the woman trapped inside the slab for directions to Starbucks (yes and iPhone reference). As they say - your millage may vary.

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The best thing about this announcement is that when Maverick ships, we should have turbo boost drivers working on the Z9PE and other dual Xeon E5 builds. 

 

These builds already get Geekbench 28000+, should be blowing the new Mac Pro out of the water when the new chips come out (2x 12 core chips anyone?).

No PCIe means that this machine doesn't deserve to be called a Mac Pro. Thunderbolt V2 is 20Gbps each way, the latest PCIe is 10x faster (31GBps). 

 

Also a dual processor machine has double the PCIe data lines, another reason that this will be a relatively weak and non-upgradable machine.

 

I will definitely be sticking with my Z9PE, twice as good for half the price I bet (and should be compatible with Xeon E5 V2 26xx chips).

 

plenty of working builds are at other sites.

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We like OSX - if we were all dedicated fan-boys, we would only have Apple 'branded' products (in quotes because I could kinda brand my hackintosh with an Apple sticker - sorta). We also like choice. That is why people try to get 10.8.4 running on AMD chips and nVidia 690 GPUs and hybrid SSD/HDD storage - because we like choice and we like a good challenge!

 

I think we have every right to analyze his (assume you mean either Tim Cook, or an Italian translation issue from personal possessive noun to possessive pronoun) / Apple's decisions, as we are the consumers. For an oversimplified example I shall use the evil empire that is Starbucks. If I bought a tall half-skinny half-1 percent extra hot split quad shot (two shots decaf, two shots regular) latte with whip, and then suddenly Starbucks says "We just improved our menu and 1 percent is no longer an option, only skinny. Now it could be argued that this may even be in my best interest as skim has no fat whereas 1 percent does have some fat. The point is that they used to offer this option - I'm not sure how many people used it because I am not privy to Starbucks inventory control system, but it was an option. I now have a choice - I can continue to get my snobbish coffee from Starbucks, I can go to Dunkin' Donuts (Microsoft OS and Dell/HP/Bob's Pretty Good Computer Company in this analogy), or I can go to my local Aldi and get some beans and roast that up myself! (for those not following along, that is the hackintosh in this analogy) I can also tell my friends and neighbors that I don't like Starbucks anymore because of their change and then engage them in debate about said change. Ultimately, people will analyze this decision with their wallets. That is the most awesome part about capitalism. Don't get me started about the crappy parts....

 

And, as for me, I try to stay away from making statements like "____ is the best" because "best" is subjective. The best part of waking up, for me, is not Foldgers in my cup. however, claiming somethings is the best has its advantages for marketing - "This is the best MacPro to date" Anyone can say that, and even Apple can print it if they so choose - but what is "best"? For me best is power and flexibility in a decent looking box. For others, its having a shiny slab they can carry around in their pocket and occasionally ask the woman trapped inside the slab for directions to Starbucks (yes and iPhone reference). As they say - your millage may vary.

OPS! sorry for the late reply.. Iphone notifications... what a mess!  ah! sorry also for my jerky/shaky english translation..

I'm really sorry for that because i think you have not completely understood the meaning of my answer. the point is not the choice, the point is the coherence. I'm not an Apple fun but Apple deserve more respect. 

I mean we can say: OH! new macpro! wtf! a new branded sh*t! look at that! what is it?! a {censored} trash? apple could not do worse...

or maybe: Oh! new Mac Pro! cool! 12core in just 10 inch! two gpus! wait wait!! where is pci? damn! maybe it should be usefull (i don't think so anyway..)

they have worked many years to do this case, the same people that develop OSX. that two things are closely related. you can't appreciate osx without appreciate mac. because they are done with the same accuracy.

Ok, I personally prefer a professional/dark/doom3 :) design (I have a dell 27'' monitor and a super square case), because it's my style, but I don't say that apple is doing something wrong. 

I think that running OSX on a custom desktop workstation is a good choice (i have once). and I think that is not a good choice running OSX on a laptop. Ok it's funny, personally i have mounted osx on more than 20 pc in my life because of that, but anyway the result is never a big deal. osx can't  transform a cheap laptop in a less cheap laptop.

The only satisfactory laptop was a dell m4600.. nvidia quadro, xeon..it was a little bit more expensive than a retina.. it was much more powerful but heavy and don't tell me about battery life.. same budget, different solution.

if you want a custom desk pc you can do whatever you want. ever.

in conclusion, apple has ever done a great job(more or less) because they have ever found the right balance between the things.

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The design is not so Apple-ish.

 

From a functional point of view, expandibility of the mass storage and replaceability of the GPUs will be a problem for many pro users. Moreover, what is the point of designing such a small form factor if by doing so you rely on the idea that everything will be connected via TB/USB/whatever? In the end, the pro users' desktops will be as cluttered as before (or even worse, if you consider how much bulky a hard drive rack can be). The same reasoning applies for noise reduction.

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I think we don't have seen all of apple's pro offer... yet.

 

I'm pretty sure they will propose a second box, same size, same look, wich you can connect with the help of not one, but two TB cables (so you could have up to 40 gb/s bandwidth!), wherein you can put pcie cards, HDs, SDD, whatever...

 

So this could solve easily the problem of expandability. Remember that since the beginning of Mac this is exactly what this is about. Macs was designed mostly as closed machines. I think apple have never liked the idea of openness / inner expandability of the pcs. But the technology of external interfaces was not ready to really apply this concept of external expandability (at least for machines destined to a general public).

 

Now they have thunderbolt, so i think they wanna push, popularize this concept to a maximum. And amha we will see the pc world, as usual, coming after.

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      The Apple-fans were removed from the fan bracket. They were loud and needed re-wiring anyways. It is recommended to put more modern fans in there. I renewed the rubber-fixings where necessary. You do not need screws to put fans in. They are held in and decoupled by the rubber. Vibration is not passed on to the case.
       

      I put the PCIe slot brackets back in (they were also painted, of course) using the rubber-headed HDD screws from other cases. In case you want to add more HDDs you have the right screws at hand.
       

      The fan-bracket fits in its original position. That works fine for most Mainboards. If you have a Mainboard with very high VRM heatsinks or high I/O (e.g. with 6 stacked USB-Ports) you can either remove the fan bracket completely (I did that for my brothers build and just clamped some BeQuiet! Silent-Wings 2 - 92mm in) or move the bracket up a bit - by not inserting the hooks under the lip, but rather clamping the bracket above the lip (I did that for the Ryzentosh, it is also very stable).
       

      The bracket holds two 92mm x 25mm Fans
      My favourite: Noctua NF-B9 redux-1600 PWM - 92mm
      They look like the original ones and are very quiet. (I used them in two projects)
       

      Cheaper Arctic PWM Fans for testing
       
       
       
      Front-Panel:
       
       

      The Power-Buttons needed to be painted, as well. Over time they lost some of their thin chrome coating due to touching. The 2-K varnish is thicker and will be much more durable.
       

      Secured the power-buttons down using double-sided tape during varnishing
       

      To make them fit perfectly again, I needed to scrape of excess paint from the sides. The buttons would easily get stuck otherwise.
       

      The case without any front-panel board or power-button.
       
      Half of the G5s I bought were “late 2005” models. The front-panel-boards of all G5s have the same size and fit in all the cases.
      Only models before “late 2005” have a front panel connector-socket. So, I had 14 front-panels that could be used with BlackCH-Mods-cables, and 14 perfectly painted cases. That’s a match.
       

      Re-installing the power-button board with its securing ring. This took a long time because every button had to be re-adjusted to work nicely again.
      Also notice the rubber piece on the right-hand side. This is needed to support the front-panel board when plugging in the cable to the connector:
       

      Installation of the front-panel board.
       

      The housing of the front-panel board has also been painted.
       

      The custom-made front-panel cable by BlackCH Mods. They were not cheap but they work.
      I marked all the connectors on one of the cables to make them easier to identify.
      Audio works perfectly even though there is a proprietary sensing pin on apples board. I recommend to set the front-panel type to “AC’97” in the BIOS / UEFI instead of the default “HD Audio”. That way the front panel audio is basically ON all the time and you can choose other outputs from the task-bar. I used Realtek drivers for Windows in my last two builds.  For a Hackintosh you would need to follow BlackCH Mods manual or ask the community about the best settings.
       

      Plugging in the mod-cable to the front-panel connector.
       

      Securing the plug with the black cap. It is pushed down even further than shown in the picture – so it clipped on to the board itself to give the connector more pressure and therefore stability.
       
       
       
      DVD / Blu-Ray drive:
       
       

      Eject the disc tray with a  paper clip.
       

      Unclip the front-plate, so it does not get stuck in the auto-opening Apple-aperture
       

      Screw in the stand-off screws (I saved those)
       

      Standoffs installed
       

      Finally, slide the drive into the mounting-bracket and close the two little retention arms. Done.
       
       
       
      PSU (Power Supply Unit):
       
       
      I thought a long time about the perfect PSU.
      I really wanted to re-use the original PSU-housing, because of the clever placement in the case. It sits flush with the mainboard at the bottom and the original power- socket is a MUST to reuse for aesthetics and stability.
       

      The original Apple power-plug with Apple power-cable.
       
      How do you get a new PSU into the original Apple PSU?
      I did not want to crack open a standart ATX PSU and jerry-rig its sensible (and dangerous) electronics into the original PSU-housing.
      So, I looked for a server-PSU that would fit inside the original housing completely with own housing and fan. Safe and sound.
      Not an easy task setting those up, because server PSUs often have proprietary connectors.
       
      Also, I wanted 600 Watts of output power to drive any overclocked CPU with a powerful graphics card like the GTX 1080Ti.
       

      Soldering on the new -internal- power-cable to the original power-socket in the Apple PSU housing.
       

      Shrink-tube protects the soldered joints.
       
      The cable will be connected to the new PSU inside. As an extension.
      The input-filter is still connected to the socket.
       

      The Apple power-cord.
       
       
      I found the perfect PSU.
      A 600W PSU by Supermicro.
       
      Supermicro is a very known brand in the professional server market. So, I can trust those PSUs to constantly deliver real 600Watts. They are designed to run under full load for years. Hence, they can be really expensive.
      Many cheap PSUs just claim to be 600W but struggle to hold that power up for longer periods of time (or they degrade). This will not happen with a Supermicro PSU.
       
      The 600W PSU comes with a 80+ Platinum rating.
      That is one of the highest Energy efficiency ratings available.
      Higher than 80+ Gold, Silver or Bronze (which is kind of the standard right now)
       
      80+ Platinum means 92-94% of the Input-power is delivered as output. Only 6-8% is transformed into heat. That was important to me in order to keep the PSU quiet.
       

      All PSUs before they were put in
       

      It has the 1U form factor. So, you could actually fit two of them in the housing.
       

      The 600W PSU plugged into the extension cord.
       

      Securing the PSU in place
       

      The 2005 Powermac Models have a bigger server power-plug (C19) suitable for higher power delivery of over 1000 Watts.
      Almost half of the cases have this kind of plug.
      They also have a bigger input filter.
       

      Soldering the extension on.
       

      Finished housing with server power jack (C19) on the outside and standart plug (C13) on the inside
       

      PSU inside the original Apple-Housing
       

      All the cables come out near the back of the case.
       

      I created bigger openings for the cables to feed through.
       

      All PSUs are prepared
       

      The PSUs and their connectors have been tested with a PSU-tester.
       
      These Server PSUs still have some proprietary connectors (and some cables, that are a bit shorter than usual), So, I bought different adapter-cables and extensions for the PSUs to make everything universal.
       
       
       
      PSU-Cables:
       
       
      - PCIe 8-Pin (2x) for graphics cards (over CPU 8-Pin adapter)
      - CPU (1x 8-Pin, 1x 4-Pin) – actually there is one more 8-Pin, but it is occupied by the PCIe-adapter. So, it is possible to do a dual-CPU setup with a small graphics-card, that does not need a dedicated power plug, as well.
      - Molex (2x) (6x over SATA-Adapter)
      - SATA (5x) (over Molex adapter), black sleeved
      - 24-Pin ATX (20 Pin is possible) + Extension (black) + Dual PSU connector
      - 12V Fan (4x over Molex Adapter), black sleeved
       

      Different types of cables and adapters (in an mATX Case)
       
      You can hide most cables behind the PSU-housing and under the mainboard, as the standoffs that hold the mainboard are quite high. That is the biggest benefit over using one of those tray-adapter-plates that would use up the space behind the mainboard.
       

      The cables in an ATX Case (not hidden / cable-managed)
       
       
       
      HDD-Caddy:
       

      The original Apple 2-Bay HDD-caddy was glued into its new place to be out of the way. Only necessary in the ATX-Cases to fit the bigger ATX Boards in. Using high-temperature silicone.
       

      Molex Power provided by adapter (if needed for 3,5” drives, most new 5400 rpm HDDs don’t even need Molex anymore)
       

      ATX Case with a bit of cable management and the HDD-caddy in place
       
       
       
      Finished ATX Barebones:
       
       

      Finished ATX case with all equipment and the server power-cord
       

      Finished ATX case with the Acrylic cover
       

      Different finished ATX Case with cover and cable management
       
       
       
      Watercooling (mATX Barebones):
       
       
      Now that the “Empty Ones” and the ATX Barebones were finished It was time to mod the mATX Cases.
       
      I added watercooling to the mATX-Barebones:
       

      Best place for the radiator is the front. Here it will blow the hot air directly out of the case.
       

      This is the 240mm radiator for the watercooling of all mATX cases
       

      To decouple the vibration of the loop from the case I used a foam seal on the front of the radiator and a thick silicone-seal on the sides and the top
       

      Gluing the radiator in with special high-temperature silicone. (This Silicone is usually used to attach the IHS to a CPU or to seal an exhaust pipe) – good for temperatures up to 329°C
       

      Radiator in Place. Thick silicone seal is decoupling the vibration of the water-pump that travels through the loop.
       

      The 240mm radiator fits right in between the PSU and the top-compartment.
       
      The mounting kits for this Cooler Master AiO support all modern processors and sockets (775, 1150, 1151, 1155, 1156, 1366, 2011, 2011-3, 2066, AM2, AM2+, AM3, AM3+, AM4, FM1, FM2, FM2+)
       

      Two 120mm high static pressure fans come with the watercooling loop. They blow out.
      You could of course turn the fans around to suck air in (positive pressure).
       
       
       
      Equipment:
       
       
      I saved the important bits and bought cables for all Barebones
       

      Every fully modded Barebone has its own new power-cable (half of them white apple cables, half of them black OEM server cables)
       
      All fully modded Barebones have the acrylic cover
       
      I kept HDD rubber-head screws, DVD-drive standoffs, Pump Mounting Kits in a little bag.
       
       
       
      Finished mATX Barebones with watercooling:
       
       
      Here are some pictures of the internal layout:
      Pictures of the outside can be seen in previous posts.
       

      Finished mATX Barebone
       

      Finished mATX Barebone with all equipment
       

      Finished mATX Barebone with all equipment
       
       
       
      Types of cases & Barebones:
       
       
      What I have right now:
       
      12 fully modded Barebones:
      6 - mATX - with watercooling
      6 - ATX - (eATX boards should also fit)
       
      12 “Empty Ones”
      - 8 prepared for ATX (3 of which have heavier orange-peel)
      - 3 prepared for mATX (1 of which has heavier orange-peel)
       
       
       
      The End:
       
       
      Thats it for now…
      What do you think?
      Was it worth it?
      What hardware would you put in?
      Please let me know…
      ;-)
       
       
      Yours, sincerely
      wise_rice
    • By elkos
      Hi guys
        I am running a graphics workstation with the specs in my signature. With the MacPro3,1 system definition, AppleTyMCEDriver.kext loads fine and my ECC RAM works (which is the main point of having a Mac Pro). Now comes Sierra and it only accepts the MacPro5,1 or MacPro6,1 profiles, which I get a kernel panic with.    So here I have a couple of specific questions:   1. What exactly is the cause of kernel panics when using the new profiles with ECC RAM? I read somewhere that AppleSMCPDRC.kext does not support (or just does not list) the Xeon E3 RamController (pci8086,108). Is that the problem? Could a hack be to simply add the controller string?   2. Apple's decision to waive support for older Mac Pros in future MacOSes brings us to the conclusion that someone has to find a way for running hacks with MacPro6,1 in a stable manner. I would like to investigate in this direction but need some initial help, because I don't understand the mechanism how exactly the chosen system definition kicks in and governs the loading of kexts or other stuff. So could someone post a clear workflow of what happens and in which order for each system profile, or better yet, which file this "roadmap" resides in?   Thanks in advance
    • By jerry7171
      I have a 2009 Mac Pro, 3.33 GHz 6-Core Intel Xeon, 32 GB Ram with an Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 with 4 GB of built in RAM. I do a lot of photography and quite a bit of 3D modeling from the photos I take. The stock Nvidia GT 120 GPU is woefully underpowered for my projects and I purchased the Nvidia GTX 960 to give my older Mac Pro the oomph it needed.
       
      I started hanging around here to learn how to utilize the Nvidia GPU since it was a PC card and not a Mac version. I've figured out how to install CUDA and use the Nvidia graphics driver app in lieu of OS X default driver.
       
      My problem is that I'm having trouble wrapping my addled mind around how to use the Nvidia Web Driver app I downloaded from here so I wouldn't have to swap my GPUs every time I update the OS.
       
      I'm dying to try the public beta for Sierra, but I can't figure out how to get the app to work? It's not immediately apparent to me what steps I take after I open it, or if it is even meant to be used with an actual Mac instead of a Hackintosh?
       
      Please take pity on a befuddled guy and point me to where I can get help figuring this out?
    • By owbp
      Input with any experience regarding this would be really appreciated guys!  
      I've already posted this topic on "Mac forum" but had no response whatsoever.
       
      So, I have bought Sapphire HD6850 for my Mac. I gotta make few music videos in FCPX and treat myself from time to tim with Arkham City and Borderland 2.   I didn't plan on flashing bios with mac EFI but after seeing few "bugs" with GPU as is, maybe that is the way to go.
       
      That's where i need your input, is this related to being PC card or not?
      - Card being recognized as HD6xxx is EFI problem, and thats one thing i know for sure.

      Yosemite is loading: AMD6000Controller, AMDFramebuffer and AMDRadeonX3000 kexts.
       
      Next, few benchmarks are working OK, but i don't know if the results are as they should be?


       
      But GFXBench and CompuBench are not working at all.

       
      In CompuBench i can mark benchmarks i want to run, but it just goes through load process, as you can see in this video.
       
      Also, i had twice the experience of bad pixelation in OS X and red, yellow and green dots on black screens in all videos (Youtube, FCPX, VLC...). The clock, icons on dock, all was suffering from strange graphics artifacts. It goes back to normal after reboot, and doesn't occur if i prevent OS X from going to sleep. then its all good. But if i keep it on with few sleep/wake cycles it happens. As far as i can tell.
       
      So my question, again, is - Does this occurs because my GPU has PC BIOS and will it change with flashing, or is this problem with this particular model of the card?
       
      Thank you all, in advance, for participating!
       
      P.S. Here is the link to the original topic, if i forgot to mention anything.
    • By Biotekk
      was thinking of doing a build of this setup,
      motherboard I'm thinking about one of the following, the MSI X99A LGA2011-3 RAIDER
      MSI X99A SLI PLUS, Socket-2011-3
      CPU becomes 5820k ago I wonder who Noctua CPU cooling or water cooling is better to prefer, however, heard that the can was more load? RAM should be enough 24 or 32 GB 2133mgz 4x 8gb or how it will be framed in the quad? graphics I have thought a Ari or nvidia which has support for 3-6 monitors as being future-proof do not need fancy then only be used for music production, then I lit a bea suitably silenced chassi tex fractal design or corsair and Samsung 256 ssd m2 PCI-E or regular samsung 950 pro what is thought about this?
       
       
      Thanks in Advance
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