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How can I find out my AppleALC audio codec?

I already tried Hackintool and DPCIManager:

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How do I find out wich appleALC codec i have?

 

Edited by lucasrp

If you have Windows install, you can run dxdiag.exe

From the exported text file, look under sound devices/Hardware ID

Or in Device Manager, select properties under sound and look under Hardware ID

10 minutes ago, Jake Lo said:

If you have Windows install, you can run dxdiag.exe

From the exported text file, look under sound devices/Hardware ID

Or in Device Manager, select properties under sound and look under Hardware ID

There's any other way? I don't have windows installed on that laptop

One way would be to go visit your motherboard manufacturer site and look for the Audio information under the specification section.

Or boot from a live linux distro (like a ubuntu version that will boot from a USB key) and then open terminal and type:

 

cat /proc/asound/card0/codec#1 > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

 

This will make a text file on the desktop with the information you're looking for in it.

Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Septendre said:

One way would be to go visit your motherboard manufacturer site and look for the Audio information under the specification section.

Or boot from a live linux distro (like a ubuntu version that will boot from a USB key) and then open terminal and type:

 

cat /proc/asound/card0/codec#1 > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

 

This will make a text file on the desktop with the information you're looking for in it.

Ok, so the result is this:

 

 

codec_dump0.txt

Edited by lucasrp

Can't see any indication of the codec in that dump. Some laptops (eg: Dell) actually list the codec model in BIOS settings. Check that out. Could help if you would specify the make and model of laptop of course...

 

Had you installed VoodooHDA + AppleHDADisabler kexts before running DPCIManager? The app won't show the codec without them.

Actually the codec dump you got is for the HDMI audio as stated in the first line of the codec_dump.txt.

What we would need is the codec dump for the audio card, so maybe it would be found by the same procedure (live ubuntu, terminal) but with card1 ...

 

cat /proc/asound/card1/codec# > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

 

that would give us the right codec dump for your card.

or card1/codec#1 ... you have to try ... and keep faith ;-) 

 

P.S.: it can also be a combination of card and codec (ex card0/codec#0, card0/codec#2, or card1/codec#2) It is actually a directory in the linux os ... so in terminal = cd\  ,  then cd cat, cd proc, cd asound, then ls to see with card exist (it will be a directory), then cd cardx, and finally ls ... once you know with exist, replace card an codec numbers in cat /proc/asound/card1/codec# > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

Edited by Septendre
  • Like 1
Posted (edited)
18 hours ago, Septendre said:

Actually the codec dump you got is for the HDMI audio as stated in the first line of the codec_dump.txt.

What we would need is the codec dump for the audio card, so maybe it would be found by the same procedure (live ubuntu, terminal) but with card1 ...

 

cat /proc/asound/card1/codec# > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

 

that would give us the right codec dump for your card.

or card1/codec#1 ... you have to try ... and keep faith ;-) 

 

P.S.: it can also be a combination of card and codec (ex card0/codec#0, card0/codec#2, or card1/codec#2) It is actually a directory in the linux os ... so in terminal = cd\  ,  then cd cat, cd proc, cd asound, then ls to see with card exist (it will be a directory), then cd cardx, and finally ls ... once you know with exist, replace card an codec numbers in cat /proc/asound/card1/codec# > ~/Desktop/codec_dump.txt

Thank You so much! Now it worked!

The command that i used was this

cat /proc/asound/card1/codec#0 > ~/Desktop/codec_dump1.txt

 

To boot with audio all i need to do it's add the arg: alcid=layoutid of the audio codec, right? (I use OpenCore)

 

codec_dump1.txt

Edited by lucasrp

That's correct: you set alcid with one of the layout values listed in AppleALC's wiki for Realtek ALC282.

  • 1 month later...
On 3/17/2021 at 1:53 AM, lucasrp said:

Ok, so the result is this:

 

 

codec_dump0.txtFetching info...

Suggest you use AppleALC and modify the config.plist to show the layout-id for your audio. 

 

Don't use the kernel switch.

 

VoodooHDA may have maximum sound output less than AppleALC.

 

May be somewhat belated but here is an excerpt from some information posted on the web:

 

Configuring your Audio Device

 

Audio devices are much simpler to configure than they used to be thanks to the development of AppleALC. AppleALC is a kernel extension that provides native Apple audio capabilites. To use it, the first thing you will need to know is what audio codec your laptop uses. If you don't already know, or if you're unsure, you can use a Linux live USB to do a codec dump. A codec dump provides a treasure trove of information about your device and the paths it uses to connect things like internal amplifiers to speakers or headphones.

 

Creating a Codec Dump

 

If you do need a codec dump for whatever reason, boot from your Linux live USB and find the nearest terminal or command line. The following command will display the details of your codec on screen with a pause so you can read it.

 

cat /proc/asound/card0/codec#0 | less

 

The first line should provide your codec. It will look something like this:

Codec: Realtek ALC294

 

If you would like to save the codec to a file so you can reference it again when you're back in macOS, cat it to a file instead and save the file to the boot partition of the USB drive, on another USB drive, or somewhere on your network.

 

cat /proc/asound/card0/codec#0 > /mnt/MyOtherUSBDrive/codec.txt

 

Now that you're familiar with your codec, let's install AppleALC.

 

AppleALC Prerequisites

 

If you're dual booting with Windows or Linux, you should enable the Devices/Audio/ResetHDA property which will reset the audio device on startup to flush any configuration .

 

Installing AppleALC

 

Installing AppleALC is simple. You just need to download the AppleALC kext from the project's release page and add the kext to OC/K. You can find it here. You may have it already if you installed it when making the USB. If you do add it, make sure to edit your config.plist

 

Download AppleALC @ Github

 

Your new AppleALC kext path should look like it does in the tree below.

EFI
└── OC
    └── Kexts
        └── AppleALC.kext

 

Before rebooting, let's configure it!

 

Configuring AppleALC

 

This is where things can get a little tricky, as just about every implementation of the same codec is different. Knowing your codec makes things somewhat easier as you can look it up in the AppleALC WIKI and find all of the layouts that could work with it.

AppleALC Supported Codecs

 

If you don't find your codec listed, you might find that it's just a rebranded version of another so it wouldn't hurt to search for "AppleALC {your codec}".

 

Once you have a list of layouts, but you don't know which is the right one you can test them one by one. Just configure the layout id in config.plist with your favorite plist editor and reboot. If audio works, congratulations! Otherwise, repeat until you've found it.

 

Open up your plist editor and the config.plist, then browse to DeviceProperties/Add and set the layout-id parameter to your layout id. It should look something like this.

 

None of the Layout IDs Worked!

 

Well, you still have some options although none of them will be fun. The first option would be to take that codec dump that we made earlier and build a new layout for your device, or you could try using YoodooHDA instead. Let's talk about both options.

 

Creating a New Layout for AppleALC

 

This nets the best benefit for you and for everyone else because you'll end up with native support and others with the same device can use it too. It's the most difficult option though. Here's some documentation to help get you started.

HDA Fix - HaC Mini Hackintosh - by osy (Great guide on how to make your own HDA patches)

AppleALC: Adding Codec Support

 

Using YoodooHDA

 

YoodooHDA is an alternative to AppleALC, and it works pretty well but rather than adding native support, YoodooHDA provides its own audio solution. Installing it is pretty straightforward. Simply download the kext, preference pane, and settings loader and add them to your system. The kext goes in C/k/O, if you have AppleALC installed you'll want to remove it. Open (execute) the preferences pane and it should prompt you to install, if it doesn't drag it onto System Preferences and it'll install that way. The settings loader should be installed to Applications, and you should run it once to enable it. They can be downloaded here.

Download YoodooHDA @ SourceForge

 

As with AppleALC, it should follow the same pattern in the tree.

EFI
└── OC
    └── Kexts
        └── ToodooHDA.kext

#####EOF#####
 

 

  • 3 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

I have ALC282

 

Use alcid=3

 

Also make sure if you are using OC to apply the HPET fix patch.

 

SSDTTime is the patcher name. This will correctly give you config.plist patches to copy into your running config.plist and create an SSDT-HPET.aml

 

Just follow the destructions of SSDTTime it is relatively very simple.  It got my Audio working.

 

Clover FixHPET,  FixRTC, FixTIMR/TMR, one more. But this works

 

just drag your DSDT.aml into SSDTTime and it will find the conflicts and create these files for you.

Pretty straight forward.

 

Edited by makk
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