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Alessandro17

Here’s Why You Can’t Pit OS X Mountain Lion Against Windows 8

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It shows a lot about how hardware and OS development go hand in hand. As sad as it is for my Macbook to be left off the Mountain Lion compatible list, the line has to be drawn somewhere in order for new OS features to be implemented that are more than just fluff that can be turned on and off. Windows 8 on the other hand, will run on any old computer found at the e-waste recycler or old Motorola flip phone-not quite, but you get the point. That can be a blessing for many and there is an upside to not being forced to upgrade hardware, but it also hinders other areas of software innovation, and stifles the market and the world's new tech driven economy as well. As it sits now Windows 8 does not give it's new users a reason to go buy any new hardware, nor does it give new hardware buyers a reason to go buy Windows 8.

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It shows a lot about how hardware and OS development go hand in hand. As sad as it is for my Macbook to be left off the Mountain Lion compatible list, the line has to be drawn somewhere in order for new OS features to be implemented that are more than just fluff that can be turned on and off. Windows 8 on the other hand, will run on any old computer found at the e-waste recycler or old Motorola flip phone-not quite, but you get the point. That can be a blessing for many and there is an upside to not being forced to upgrade hardware, but it also hinders other areas of software innovation, and stifles the market and the world's new tech driven economy as well. As it sits now Windows 8 does not give it's new users a reason to go buy any new hardware, nor does it give new hardware buyers a reason to go buy Windows 8.

 

I agree with that but I have a little criticize there.

 

Tell me what's the difference between Windows 7 and Vista. Nothing.. Completely nothing except those display effects which are not really extreme.

 

Tell me what's the difference between Snow Leopard and Lion.. Man that's a lot!

 

Tell me what's the difference between iPhone 3G and iPhone 4, loads of features.

 

That's why Apple must force you to buy a new hardware.

 

You won't join war with a skiff.

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I will be interested in reading about the experiences of power-users with Mountain Lion. As the desktop/laptop experience begins to emulate the handheld device experience, I cannot help but think that power-users will be disappointed and that they will feel that the OS is for novices and those with no desire to understand how an operating system works and what it is capable of doing. Where I live, the white apple logo on a laptop is like the mercedes-benz hood ornament. In both cases, they are merely status symbols and their owners have no real appreciation for their capabilities nor recognition of their draw-backs. I, personally, do not like one OS better than another. They all have features that are superior to the others and they all have draw-backs that make me want to try to integrate them. I have had to decide if I want to get rid of my perfectly good 17-inch laptop because it has the X3100 GPU and cannot support ML. So far, from what I have seen of ML, it's simply not worth it. On the other hand, I can run Windows 7 or Windows 8 in a pure 64-bit environment. It is only OS X that requires the X3100 GPU to run in 32-bit. I would think that makes OS X inferior, not superior, to Windows. But OS X runs cooler on my laptop and uses less resources than Windows 7, less so with Windows 8. So, whether you base your comparison between Windows and OS X on the two companies' approach to tablets or you base the comparison on performance and OS capabilities, it seems to me that their are reasons to favor both systems for a variety of reasons. Just my 2 cents.

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I will be interested in reading about the experiences of power-users with Mountain Lion. As the desktop/laptop experience begins to emulate the handheld device experience, I cannot help but think that power-users will be disappointed and that they will feel that the OS is for novices and those with no desire to understand how an operating system works and what it is capable of doing. Where I live, the white apple logo on a laptop is like the mercedes-benz hood ornament. In both cases, they are merely status symbols and their owners have no real appreciation for their capabilities nor recognition of their draw-backs. I, personally, do not like one OS better than another. They all have features that are superior to the others and they all have draw-backs that make me want to try to integrate them. I have had to decide if I want to get rid of my perfectly good 17-inch laptop because it has the X3100 GPU and cannot support ML. So far, from what I have seen of ML, it's simply not worth it. On the other hand, I can run Windows 7 or Windows 8 in a pure 64-bit environment. It is only OS X that requires the X3100 GPU to run in 32-bit. I would think that makes OS X inferior, not superior, to Windows. But OS X runs cooler on my laptop and uses less resources than Windows 7, less so with Windows 8. So, whether you base your comparison between Windows and OS X on the two companies' approach to tablets or you base the comparison on performance and OS capabilities, it seems to me that their are reasons to favor both systems for a variety of reasons. Just my 2 cents.

That's what makes opinions great-they differ :) I've been using ML since DP1/day 1 and consider myself a power user, but others may consider me a douch bag. Again differing opinions :) As with any new OS release regardless of platform-cough-Linux-cough-there are changes made to make things easier for the average Joe that power users may not like, but rarely they completely remove functionality, so any power user worth their salt will know or learn how to disable and/or circumvent them to get things back to their powerful ways. How much of an improvement ML is/will be over Lion and how much better or worse Win 8 will be than Win 7 is also going to be a matter of opinion. What is not an opinion is that taking a swan dive into the great unknown that is Mountain Lion will cost $19.99 while Win 8 will cost $10T,SM0.RE

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That's what makes opinions great-they differ :) I've been using ML since DP1/day 1 and consider myself a power user, but others may consider me a douch bag. Again differing opinions :) As with any new OS release regardless of platform-cough-Linux-cough-there are changes made to make things easier for the average Joe that power users may not like, but rarely they completely remove functionality, so any power user worth their salt will know or learn how to disable and/or circumvent them to get things back to their powerful ways. How much of an improvement ML is/will be over Lion and how much better or worse Win 8 will be than Win 7 is also going to be a matter of opinion. What is not an opinion is that taking a swan dive into the great unknown that is Mountain Lion will cost $19.99 while Win 8 will cost $10T,SM0.RE

 

Damn, that Win 8 sounds really pricey. ;) But I couldn't agree with you more about power users being able to make modifications to suit their needs and desires. I have been reading up on macrumors about successes running ML with the X3100 GPU using the 10.6.2 kexts. There seems to be some folks working on getting ML to work in 32-bit so that there will be full QE/CI functionality for the X3100. Of course, no one has yet figured out how to make a 64-bit version of the X3100 kexts so that MacBooks (and other laptops) that use the X3100 will have true 64-bit architecture and full QE/CI. I have faith, however, that some power user will come up with something since there appears to be no inherent barrier to making that happen.

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Damn, that Win 8 sounds really pricey. ;) But I couldn't agree with you more about power users being able to make modifications to suit their needs and desires. I have been reading up on macrumors about successes running ML with the X3100 GPU using the 10.6.2 kexts. There seems to be some folks working on getting ML to work in 32-bit so that there will be full QE/CI functionality for the X3100. Of course, no one has yet figured out how to make a 64-bit version of the X3100 kexts so that MacBooks (and other laptops) that use the X3100 will have true 64-bit architecture and full QE/CI. I have faith, however, that some power user will come up with something since there appears to be no inherent barrier to making that happen.

yeah same deal with GMA950, It's possible to install ML but good luck trying to watch YouTube without a 64bit kext for it :(

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