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The most simple dual boot with installation DVD...


flaker
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The simplest way to make a dual boot, it's the way that br0adband did in his patch installation guide... (but without win98se boot disk which he mentioned)

 

1. Install Tiger from DVD ... before installation make 2 partition with diskutility on Tiger Installer... Choose first partition for Tiger...

2. Reboot after installation and verify if Tiger works well...

3. Boot up with WindowsXP CD...

4. Choose second partition (it may be showed as E: unknown partition..) Delete it and recreate partition... Once done, reboot with F3... Now you have new partition for windows...

5. When you restart Windows installation process, it will be showed as C: , so you can continue installation (Do not touch another partition for Tiger)

6. Once installation is completed, boot up with Windows (of course, your machine can be only boot up with windows...)

7. choose start/execute/cmd

8. type "diskpart" this will reactivate tiger partition...

9. choose tiger partition and activate it... (select disk, select partition, activate)

10. reboot your machine, now you have Darwin bootloader to choose the OS betwwen Tiger and Windows.... :)

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The simplest way to make a dual boot, it's the way that br0adband did in his patch installation guide... (but without win98se boot disk which he mentioned)

 

1. Install Tiger from DVD ... before installation make 2 partition with diskutility on Tiger Installer... Choose first partition for Tiger...

2. Reboot after installation and verify if Tiger works well...

3. Boot up with WindowsXP CD...

4. Choose second partition (it may be showed as E: unknown partition..) Delete it and recreate partition... Once done, reboot with F3... Now you have new partition for windows...

5. When you restart Windows installation process, it will be showed as C: , so you can continue installation (Do not touch another partition for Tiger)

6. Once installation is completed, boot up with Windows (of course, your machine can be only boot up with windows...)

7. choose start/execute/cmd

8. type "diskpart" this will reactivate tiger partition...

9. choose tiger partition and activate it... (select disk, select partition, activate)

10. reboot your machine, now you have Darwin bootloader to choose the OS betwwen Tiger and Windows.... :)

 

This method may make your machine fail to boot with the hard drive inserted. What can happen is that the Windows partition is still designated as Boot, while the Mac partition is designated as Active, and that can confuse some systems. And yes, I am right now scronging together another system to write zeros to my hard drive...

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This method may make your machine fail to boot with the hard drive inserted.  What can happen is that the Windows partition is still designated as Boot, while the Mac partition is designated as Active, and that can confuse some systems.  And yes, I am right now scronging together another system to write zeros to my hard drive...

Confuse some system? I can't understand what you mean... :mellow:

This is fresh install for both 2 OSs...

Normally, there is no problem if you install Tiger on the first partition...

If you tried to install Tiger on windows installed drive, it may not work...

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ok.. ive installed the release 1 on a different partition after my windows was preinstalled on the same disk.. my computer rebooted directly to windows.. so i figure i just need to configure a bootloader so i can select between the two...

 

i dont have a windows installation disk, because i'm running media center 2005, which only comes preinstalled and or on system recovery disks..

 

i've thought about booting the OSX installation disc and setting the Tiger partition as active, but i've read about a few people having trouble getting windows back..

 

 

so what would be the easiest method of accomplishing this?

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If you install Tiger on the windows preinstalled disk, you must other utility or darwin boot file...

I think that the simplest way for you is download darwin boot file (you may find as chain0 file)...

extract it on c:, and edit your boot.ini file of windows..

Once done, you can get Windows bootloader to choose between Windows and MacOS..

but once you choose, MacOS, darwin bootloader will pop up one more time..

So you will have 2 boot loader, that's why I recommend fresh install... :lol:

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i managed to install tiger on one of my old ntfs partitions, that i made primary

the only boot loader i got was the darwin one. but i had some problems with osx86 and deleated the osx86 partition in partition magic, i went to reinstall osx86 on a new ntfs partiton that i set as primary but it will no longer boot :lol:

 

i dont realy want to reinstall windows again.

 

edit. i have fixed the boot problem. my MBR was fudged to i fixed it with the windows xp cd and used the recovery console.

Edited by xSuRgEx
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Confuse some system? I can't understand what you mean...  :(

This is fresh install for both 2 OSs...

Normally, there is no problem if you install Tiger on the first partition...

If you tried to install Tiger on windows installed drive, it may not work...

 

Allow me to explain then...

 

Clean install, Tiger on Part1, Free Space on Part2. Install Windows (getting windows to see part 2 as C:). Then, in diskpart, setting Part1 as active.

 

What happens is Part1 is active, but part 2 still reads as boot, and now my D915GUXL won't boot the drive at all.

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The simplest way to make a dual boot, it's the way that br0adband did in his patch installation guide... (but without win98se boot disk which he mentioned)

 

1. Install Tiger from DVD ... before installation make 2 partition with diskutility on Tiger Installer... Choose first partition for Tiger...

2. Reboot after installation and verify if Tiger works well...

3. Boot up with WindowsXP CD...

4. Choose second partition (it may be showed as E: unknown partition..) Delete it and recreate partition... Once done, reboot with F3... Now you have new partition for windows...

5. When you restart Windows installation process, it will be showed as C: , so you can continue installation (Do not touch another partition for Tiger)

6. Once installation is completed, boot up with Windows (of course, your machine can be only boot up with windows...)

7. choose start/execute/cmd

8. type "diskpart" this will reactivate tiger partition...

9. choose tiger partition and activate it... (select disk, select partition, activate)

10. reboot your machine, now you have Darwin bootloader to choose the OS betwwen Tiger and Windows.... :blink:

 

WOW your instructions are great almost as good as the ones that came with the release of the latest patch....Of course being identical really makes this post a waste.

 

 

V Dual Booting (My specific method which I'll support if needed)

 

Here's how I did my dual boot with OSx86 and XP. I'm not going to go into extreme details, it's simply not needed at this point. I use the Darwin bootloader to dual boot between OSx86 and XP and I have no issues whatsoever. So here goes...

 

1) Install OSx86 as instructed above in step IV. When choosing the Volume Scheme, choose 2 Partitions instead of 1. I chose 2, set the OSx86 partition to ~8GB (8000 in the partition size box), HFS+ filesystem, named it OSx86 and then set the remaining space on the drive as Free Space in the Format box. Clicked Partition, clicked Partition again and when it was done went through the install process.

 

2) When the install was done I booted into OSx86 to verify things were ok then I rebooted to install XP.

 

3) I then installed XP on the remaining drive space (roughly 29GB on my 40GB drive). But there's a catch here you have to address. When you start the setup process off the XP CD, it will come up at the partition selection screen with several interesting things. It'll show C: (which is actually your OSx86 partition, so don't touch that). It will show the remaining unallocated space and that's what you have to work with.

 

Here's the catch.

 

When you go to create a partition on that free space (I chose 10GB for my XP partition), it'll see that newly created partition as your E: drive. If you choose to create another partition (I did, I made another one with the the remaing space that appeared as F:) That's not right, right? I mean, we all know the standard drive letter for Windows is C: soooo... we have to resolve this.

 

Once you've created the partition, and it shows as E: (and possibly F: as mentioned above) press F3 to abort the installation of XP. Press F3 again to reboot the computer but don't remove the XP CD.

 

The purpose of rebooting the computer is to reset the XP setup program to detect the newly created partition as the C: drive. Upon the reboot, going back into the setup program, now things look different. You'll see the C: partition you created properly identified, then you'll see D: which was F: - don't worry, it's working perfectly although some people get lost in the shuffle of drive letters.

 

Point is, when you do this, it'll set the first partition after the OSx86 partition as C: and if you have another partition that will become D: then your CD/DVD drive becomes E: In other words, the drive letters are in sequence as we Windows users love.

 

I personally can't stand Unix/Linux drive addressing schemes, but that's just me. Moving on...

 

Install XP to C: and when it's done, remove the CD after XP boots (like you did above in the OSx86 installation. You'll be staring at the XP bootscreen after a few seconds.

 

But but but but but wait wait wait... what happened to my OSx86 partition you're asking. Well, it's there, but I want you to boot into XP first to make sure things are ok.

 

Boot fully into XP and see what's going on, make sure stuff is working and the install went as planned. If you did create a second partition, open Explorer and verify it's there, etc.

 

When you're done and you're ready to fix the dual boot issue, here's what you'll need:

 

You need a 98SE boot floppy, or a 98SE bootable CD, or something with fdisk on it. Or, if you know of some other utilities that can set a particular partition as Active, that's what you need to use.

 

The simple task at hand is: use the utility to set the OSx86 partition as Active.

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Allow me to explain then...

 

Clean install, Tiger on Part1, Free Space on Part2.  Install Windows (getting windows to see part 2 as C:).  Then, in diskpart, setting Part1 as active.

 

What happens is Part1 is active, but part 2 still reads as boot, and now my D915GUXL won't boot the drive at all.

I can't understand clearly what it means "part 2 still reads as boot"

If you installed Tiger on part1, it will be disabled when you install windows.

and your windows on part2 is assigned as a C:

so you can boot up with windows before activating Tiger.. (just like you made only one partition for windows installation, because Tiger partition can't be recognized by windows)

Once you activate Tiger partition, now it's Darwin bootloader on MBR which controles your drive, so you can use dual boot between 2OSs..

 

I have no idea what happens on your machine, but on my laptop&desktop, there is no problem with this methode..

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Well, mine just happens to be the developer kit... so if it doesn't work on that, all I'm saying is make sure you aren't using a partition you're not willing to kiss goodbye.

 

When Part1 is reactivated in DiskPart, it does read active, but Part2 is still reading as the Boot. I suspect that Windows is screwing up the MBR so that some BIOS are tricked up... Part 1 is made active, Part 2 is then inactive, but, Windows still leaves Part 2 as "booting".

 

I suspect fdisk is much more friendly in how it handles the process, I'm going to try that next.

 

Update: The Plot Thickens

 

So, I zeroed out the sectors on my drive, ran Western Digital diagnostics, everything came back clear. Booted OS X disc, made two partitions, the first 128 GB for OS X, the remaining 22 GB for Windows (left as empty space). Installed OS X without incident.

 

Then installed Windows XP Media Center Edition 2005 with Fat32, rebooting after creating the Windows partition, then formatting with Fat32. Installed without incident.

 

So, then I booted a 98 boot disk, opened fdisk, and set the active partition to 1 (the OS X partition). Rebooted. I now get a "Error Loading Operating System" BIOS prompt when booting the HD.

 

Then booted from Mac OS X install again. Ran disk repair then went to startup disk and selected the HD as the startup disk and rebooted. That got me back into OS X, but sans Darwin bootloader. This is because when you target a disk in startup disk, it supresses the Darwin bootloader. Holding F8 then brings it back, I suspect you can edit the boot.plist to force it to return as well.

 

However, to make a long story short, it now works. The trick is to boot again with the OS X install disk, repair the hard drive in Disk Utility, then open the Startup Disk utility from the same menu and target the HD from there for startup.

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