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60Hz 4K on Mavericks with GTX 760? [UPDATE: 10.9.3 works [UPDATED UPDATE: maybe]]

4K UltraHD Retina NVIDIA GTX 760 60Hz 60 FPS

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#81
smolderas

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Is that ok that I don't have any icons in display settings (smaller text, bigger text), just the resolution numbers, and nothing about Hi-DPI like on screenshots here? My display still shows at 5120 x 2880 so I'm assuming it works correctly. using GTX 760 and samsung U28D590.

What is your Product name in your smbios?



#82
StephanCA

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What is your Product name in your smbios?

Mac Pro 6,1. It was on 5,1 too. No difference.



#83
boli

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Anyone know if the 31.5" Dell UP3214Q works with a Hack?

 

The only thing I found so far is that it does work on a Mac Pro (late 2013) according to this video, and in its comments the poster mentions that it runs at 60 Hz (two of them at least, not the 3rd). Also it is mentioned in Apples 4K support document. So I'm at least somewhat hopeful.

 

On the other hand, the 24" Dell runs fine [1] on a Mac Pro (late 2013, at work, with ASUS PQ321Q as main display), but was a bit troublesome on my Hack (at home, where I'm currently running an ASUS 28" PB287Q).

 

[1] Except that the Mac Pro can't run it in portrait mode, where the Hack could.



#84
boli

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Got a 31.5" Dell UP3214Q as main display on my Hack now. Unsurprisingly, it has the same problems that the 24" had:

  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting off it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options
  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on it stays black, with its power light flickering and menu unavailable because it can't detect any input source
  • Using iMac14,2 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on or off (does not matter) it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options.

That's using OS X 10.9.3 and Chameleon v2.2 r2377. I'll try more stuff later, such as 10.9.4 upgrade.



#85
smolderas

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Got a 31.5" Dell UP3214Q as main display on my Hack now. Unsurprisingly, it has the same problems that the 24" had:

  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting off it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options
  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on it stays black, with its power light flickering and menu unavailable because it can't detect any input source
  • Using iMac14,2 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on or off (does not matter) it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options.

That's using OS X 10.9.3 and Chameleon v2.2 r2377. I'll try more stuff later, such as 10.9.4 upgrade.

Could you test retina macbook pro SMBios?



#86
boli

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Could you test retina macbook pro SMBios?

 

Yes, that's also on the TODO list, as well as that Clover USB Stick with default SMBIOS combined with MacPro6,1 SMBios on the internal drive hybrid method that worked for somebody else.



#87
boli

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Still no luck with the UP3214Q:

  • With MacPro3,1 SMBios: Same behavior as with iMac14,2
  • With MacPro5,1 SMBios: Kernel panic during boot process
  • With MacBookPro11,3 SMBios: Same behavior as with iMac14,2
  • Clover USB stick: while I could select my internal boot drive (with MacPro6,1 SMBios on it) it would not boot - both displays stayed black so I shut down after a while

​I wonder if there's a firmware update available for the display that would help.



#88
StephanCA

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Still no luck with the UP3214Q:

  • With MacPro3,1 SMBios: Same behavior as with iMac14,2
  • With MacPro5,1 SMBios: Kernel panic during boot process
  • With MacBookPro11,3 SMBios: Same behavior as with iMac14,2
  • Clover USB stick: while I could select my internal boot drive (with MacPro6,1 SMBios on it) it would not boot - both displays stayed black so I shut down after a while

​I wonder if there's a firmware update available for the display that would help.

Could just wait a bit and buy a monitor that doesn't use MST. My samsung U28D590 is fine, soon probably there will be 32-inch screens that don't use MST.

 

Update: Never mind, didn't knew you already had 4 monitors with 3 of them IPS)



#89
boli

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Yeah, and MST isn't necessarily the culprit, as my 31.5" ASUS works just fine with it.

 

Also, the 24" Dell worked perfectly with some of the earlier 10.9.3 betas, and Windows 8.1, and on a real MacPro6,1 with 10.9.3/10.9.4. :-/

 

BTW the 31.5" Dell replaced the 28" ASUS (sold it to a friend) so I'm back to 3x IPS, all of them with MST.



#90
Audiophilip

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Got a 31.5" Dell UP3214Q as main display on my Hack now. Unsurprisingly, it has the same problems that the 24" had:

  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting off it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options
  • Using MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on it stays black, with its power light flickering and menu unavailable because it can't detect any input source
  • Using iMac14,2 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on or off (does not matter) it runs at 30 Hz, including proper scaling options.

That's using OS X 10.9.3 and Chameleon v2.2 r2377. I'll try more stuff later, such as 10.9.4 upgrade.

A remark for the second point (MacPro6,1 SMBios with DisplayPort 1.2 setting on): if you power-cycle or temporarily change the input on the monitor, then it gets recognized and runs fine in 30Hz mode.



#91
boli

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Thanks, that's what I'm currently doing (given I still boot into Win 8.1 from time to time and want to avoid switching the DisplayPort 1.2 setting; even though it's far easier to do than on the ASUS :P because of DELLs good on-screen menu and buttons).

 

BTW given it still won't run at 60 Hz I might eventually swap it with the ASUS 31.5", which is currently on a Mac Pro at work.



#92
c0ercion

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A few weeks ago I pulled the EDID out of that IOReg from the previous page, and it is different from my own up2414q EDID. It may be worth popping that into a display override, I simply haven't had the time or motivation to play with it lately. There are other differences in IOReg as well that may be worth reproducing in your own DSDT.



#93
boli

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Updating to 10.9.4 didn't help make the UP3214Q work any better either.

 

Also I noticed that when you Option-click the Scaled button in the Displays preference pane to display more resolutions, and also check Show low resolution modes, it does show the Refresh rate popup menu once again. It reads 30.3 Hz when the display stays black, and unfortunately the popup menu is grayed out, so one can't select any other refresh rates.



#94
Joshua Williams

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Culled from nVidia's website.

https://developer.nv...ion-development

 

 

I think it should answer some of your questions

  Resolutions

The 4K display standard contains two resolutions:

  • 3840*2160: This is the standard resolution supported by TVs and monitors
  • 4096*2160: Projectors will support this slightly wider aspect ratio format
Industry Support for 4K

There are 2 ways of delivering 4K content, HDMI and DisplayPort.

A) HDMI

The current HDMI 1.4 standard only has bandwidth for 4K at 30hz. HDMI 2.0 will add support for 4K at 60Hz. Details should become clearer in late 2013. There are a few TVs on sale today that support 4K @ 30Hz through HDMI.

B) DisplayPort 1.2

DisplayPort can support 4K @ 60Hz using Multi-Stream Transport(MST). The graphics card provides signals for multiple displays but these are multiplexed on a single cable. Computer monitors such as the ASUS PQ321Q 31.5-in 4K 60 Hz Tiled Monitor take input using this format.

NVIDIA GPU support for 4K Resolutions

All GeForce GTX 600 and 700 series GPUs can support 4K resolutions through DisplayPort. The NVIDIA driver automatically detects 4K 60Hz tiled format, so no special user set up is required. In order to power games at this resolution with settings turned up NVIDIA recommends GTX 780 SLI or better.

What consumer 4K displays available today?

A variety of solutions are available today from manufactures like Asus and Sharp. Dell has also recently announced their 4K UltraSharp 32 display with availability in Q4 2013.

4K Development Tips and Tricks 1) Support 4K resolutions natively

The standard 4K UHD display resolution for monitors and televisions is 3840 x 2160 pixels. Projectors supporting the wider 4096 x 2160 pixels will also be available. Your game title should enumerate the available modes (using functions such as EnumDisplaySettings or GetDisplayModeList) and support native rendering to those resolutions.

2) Provide the Highest Resolution Textures

Texture content that is optimized to avoid magnification at 1080p resolution will magnify at 4K, leading to blurry textures when you get up close to surfaces. To maximize the quality at 4K screen resolution, provide the highest texel density you possibly can in your game by using the largest possible texture sizes. For example, for textures where the player can get close enough for 1:1 texel to pixel ratio, 4096 x 4096 textures will provide the highest quality. This is especially important for textures which provide detail, such as albedo textures, normal maps, and displacement maps, but can also be important for procedurally generated textures, such as light maps, which can be generated at higher resolution for display on 4K screens.

3) Enable Anisotropic Filtering

4K screens will resolve additional underlying detail, so maximizing texture detail is key. Using anisotropic filtering will add detail to the image, and be even more noticeable at 4K resolutions.

4) Optimize for SLI

4K UHD has four times the pixels of 1080p – which means four times the pixel workload. Scaling with SLI multi-GPU setups will be even more important to ensure the smoothest experience at 4K resolutions. Be careful to avoid the usual SLI pitfalls, such as interframe dependencies, CPU-GPU sync points, and improper use of queries.

You can find the SLI developer documentation here.

5) Provide Scaling for UI Elements

Resolution-dependent UI elements (bitmaps) will look smaller at 4K – which may be preferred by some game players, while others will find them too small. Providing scaling support or favoring resolution-independent UI techniques will guarantee the best experience for every gamer.

6) Perform Adaptive Tessellation Based on Screen Space Metrics

Tessellation is a great fit for 4K displays, as the additional detail will be even more impressive at high resolutions. To get the most of adaptive tessellation on 4K, make sure you're using adaptive techniques which take into account screen resolution when determining tessellation factor. You'll want to be using more triangles at 4K, and screen-space tessellation metrics will naturally provide this.

7) Beware of Magnification Artifacts

In addition to magnification of source textures (see “Provide the Highest Resolution Textures” above), you will get additional magnification at 4K of fetches from other offscreen render targets, such as shadow maps. This can result in unpleasant and unexpected artifacts. It's best to test these algorithms at 4K resolution and work around these issues, such as by increasing your shadow map resolution or filter quality.

8) Optimize Video Memory Consumption

4K resolution is obviously heavier on video memory consumption than lower resolutions. Four times the pixels will mean four times the memory used for screen sized buffers, in addition to any additional memory consumed by higher resolution source art (“Maximize Texture Resolution” above) or higher resolution intermediate surfaces such as shadow maps (“Beware of Magnification Artifacts” above).



#95
boli

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I would guess most people who are into this topic know all of this already. ;) Additionally, nowadays there are some displays that can do UHD @ ~60 Hz with SST, such as the Asus P287Q, Samsung U28D590D or Lenovo Pro2840m. Of these at least the Asus model works fine on a Hack.

 

And while OS X officially supports some MST displays and HiDPI scaling since 10.9.3 (a little earlier for the Mac Pro), some of those officially supported displays (namely the Dell models) do not work properly on Hack (when running OS X that is, they work fine in Windows), see earlier posts.

 

Speaking about Dell, I moved the Dell UP3214Q to my office today, and on a Mac Pro (late 2013) it runs fine at 60 Hz, same as the secondary display (UP2414Q).

 

Yesterday I moved a (Mac ROM) GTX 680 (which I had sold to a friend earlier, long story) back into my old Mac Pro (see sig), replacing a Radeon 5870, updated the Mac Pro to 10.9.4 (it hadn't been used in months :P ) to give the Dell a try before I took it away. In the Displays preference pane it didn't show the usual 5 scalings/resolutions, but instead it showed the selection list that is usually only displayed once the Scaled radio button is clicked while the Option key is pressed. It could run the display at full resolution, but 30 Hz only. I'll give the ASUS PQ321 a try once I took it back home, to see if that's a Dell-specific issue.







Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: 4K, UltraHD, Retina, NVIDIA, GTX 760, 60Hz, 60 FPS


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