Jump to content

[HOW TO] Seamless upgrade from 10.4.x to 10.4.11 + Security Patches


  • Please log in to reply
58 replies to this topic

#1
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts
Updated 2008/6/28. There have been a few incidents where systems have been unusable after performing an upgrade even when using the Restore script properly, and it has been tracked down to kexts which have previously been removed by the user but which the new upgrade or security patch has re-installed. The Restore script now takes this into account and disables those re-installed kexts automatically, so following this procedure should now result in a working upgrade in every situation.

There are lots of threads asking about how to safely upgrade, and there are lots of posts giving instructions that work for some people but not others. This is intended to be a "once and for all" solution, both for major upgrades and for security patches. Several posts describe security patches as safe to apply, but many people still report problems. The procedure described below will make sure your system still works. It's not necessary when installing regular program updates, like Safari 3.1.1, only system updates and security patches. I have successfully installed the 10.4.11 update from a 10.4.8 system, and security patches 2008-02 and 2008-03, using this procedure. And I now have a 100% working up-to-date system.

There are two shell scripts that need to be created, "backup.sh" and "restore.sh" which, as the names imply, backup critical system components on your current installation and then restore those components after an upgrade.

ONE-TIME SETUP
First, you need to create a backup directory and put the backup and restore scripts in that directory. This only needs to be done once. Thereafter, installing an update is as simple as running two scripts. A good place for the backup directory is in your home directory, so open a terminal and do the following:
cd ~sudo -s{enter password}mkdir sys_backupcd sys_backup

You can, of course, use a different directory name and location (the scripts only operate within the directory in which they are executed). Still in the terminal window, type:
nano backup.sh

Now, copy the following code and paste it into the nano editor (to paste within nano, right-click and select Paste):
backup.sh:
#!/bin/sh# --------echo Backing up kernel ...cp -p /mach_kernel ./# --------echo Backing up kernel extensions, bundles, plugins ...if [ ! -d system.library.extensions ]then    echo Creating backup system.library.extensions directory ...    mkdir system.library.extensionsficp -Rp /System/Library/Extensions/* system.library.extensions/# --------echo Backing up loginwindow.app ...if [ ! -d system.library.coreservices ]then    echo Creating backup system.library.coreservices directory ...    mkdir system.library.coreservicesficp -Rp /System/Library/CoreServices/loginwindow.app system.library.coreservices/# --------echo Backing up profiler reporters ...if [ ! -d system.library.systemprofiler ]then    echo Creating backup system.library.systemprofiler directory ...    mkdir system.library.systemprofilerficp -Rp /System/Library/SystemProfiler/* system.library.systemprofiler/# --------echo Backing up configuration bundles ...if [ ! -d system.library.systemconfiguration ]then    echo Creating backup system.library.systemconfiguration directory ...    mkdir system.library.systemconfigurationficp -Rp /System/Library/SystemConfiguration/* system.library.systemconfiguration/echo All done!

CTRL+O will save the file and CTRL+X will exit nano. To make sure the script is executable (or else you won't be able to run it) type this command:
chmod +x backup.sh

Now we need the restore script.
UPDATED 2008/6/28. Now disables kexts that may have previously been removed by the user, but have been re-installed by the upgrade/patch.

nano restore.sh

Copy the following code and paste it into the nano editor:
restore.sh:
#!/bin/sh# --------echo Restoring kernel ...if [ ! -f ./mach_kernel ]then    echo Backup of mach_kernel does not exist. Execute backup.sh first. You are probably screwed.    exitficp -p ./mach_kernel /# --------echo Restoring kernel extensions, bundles, plugins ...curr_dir=$PWD/system.library.extensionscd /System/Library/Extensionsfor file in *    do        if [ -e "$curr_dir/$file" ]            then cp -Rp "$curr_dir/$file" /System/Library/Extensions/            else                 echo    Disabling "$file"...                mv "$file" "$curr_dir/$file_disabled"        fi                    donecd $curr_dir/..# --------echo Restoring loginwindow.app ...cp -Rp system.library.coreservices/* /System/Library/CoreServices/# --------echo Restoring configuration bundles ...cp -Rp system.library.systemconfiguration/* /System/Library/SystemConfiguration/# --------echo Restoring profiler reporters ...cp -Rp system.library.systemprofiler/* /System/Library/SystemProfiler/# --------echo Cleaning kernel extensions cache ...rm /System/Library/Extensions.mkextrm /System/Library/Extensions.kextcache# --------echo Repairing disk permissions ...diskutil repairPermissions /echo All done!

CTRL+O to save, CTRL+X to exit. Again make sure the script is executable:
chmod +x restore.sh

You now have everything in place to perform all updates in the future.

BACKING UP YOUR SYSTEM
Before you upgrade or apply a security patch, run the backup script. NOTE: You must "sudo -s" before running the scripts since the files involved are owned by root:wheel. I was tempted to put the sudo command in the script itself, but I decided it was better to sudo manually so that you know you're about to change system files. Open a terminal, sudo, cd to your sys_backup directory, and run backup.sh:
sudo -s{enter password}cd ~/sys_backup./backup.sh

The script will display the steps it is performing while backing up the critical components. IF YOU SEE AN ERROR MESSAGE, DO NOT CONTINUE UNTIL YOU'VE RESOLVED THE PROBLEM. Most likely you didn't copy/paste the scripts properly, or if you input them by hand there's a typo. If you've followed the one-time setup procedure exactly, you should not get any errors, so double-check that you've done everything right before you post problems in this thread.

When the script completes, you now have all your system critical components backed up and are ready to upgrade. You may want to copy your sys_backup folder to a memory stick or external drive, just to be on the safe side. It's called a Hackintosh for a reason. :P

UPDATE PROCEDURE
Leave the Terminal window open, start the Software Update tool and click "Check Now". At this point, you want to update the system, not individual programs, so uncheck everything except the update you're installing. Let the system perform the upgrade, but DO NOT CLICK THE RESTART BUTTON. This is very important (which is why it's bold, CAPITALIZED, and red). You do not want the system to reboot into an upgraded kernel, because that will mean certain death 99% of the time. Leave that window as it is, waiting for you to click Restart, and go back to the terminal to run the restore script:
./restore.sh

This script restores your critical components, clears the kext cache, and repairs disk permissions. It will display the steps as it goes, and when disk permissions are being repaired you may get a whole slew of output. This is normal and means that some permissions were repaired. When the script is done, go back to the Software Update window and click Restart.

This backup/update/restore procedure can be followed for the security patches as well. As I said, some people have reported no problems installing a security patch without doing anything fancy, but I got a Gray Screen Of Death several times trying to install the 2008-02 security update before I settled on this procedure.

CONCLUSION
Once you have done your one-time setup, upgrading (or installing a security patch) is as simple as:
1) sudo -s, then run backup.sh
2) Install the upgrade/patch but DO NOT RESTART yet
3) run restore.sh, then Restart

Technically, you should only have to run the backup script once, so the process boils down to just the last two steps. However, I recommend running the backup script every time, since it is possible that your backup files may have accidentally been deleted or altered in some way during your day-to-day work (though not likely).

Some people may note that the backup script backs up more files than are really necessary; however, I found out the hard way that it is difficult to determine in advance which files you really need to back up for a particular update. Better safe than sorry, as they say.

#2
Tails92

Tails92

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Just Joined
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
I did it the hard way a month ago, updating XxX 10.4.10 to 10.4.11 on a (crappy) Gericom Laptop with 256mb of ram.
I backed up some kexts (I don't remember which ones) andmach_kernel(SSE2) that I knew had to be copied by looking on the net, fired up Software Update and I let it do its work. Whenit askedme to reboot, I didn'tclick anything (soitdidn't reboot), I opened up a terminaland restored allof the files Ibacked up, then I fixed thepermissions with Disk Utility.
It then rebooted fine (except waiting almost a quarter of hour for diskarb, but that only happens on the first reboot after the update), and installed back the Loginwindow and System Profiler patches from the XxX DVD.
Everything was fine after that.
I tried and succedeed by using pretty much the same procedure on a Dell Optiplex with a Socket 423 Pentium 4.
I wrote a guide about installing Tiger on that laptop, and I still have it on the laptop itself, I should polish it and put it (or a link to it) on the wiki sometime.

Anyway, why are you copying all of the extensions from 10.4.10 on a 10.4.11? Most other kexts except for six or seven work perfectly fine, so you don't need that as you lose some updated drivers.
If you wanted to copy extensions just to be sure, you'd at most require a dozen IMHO.

#3
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

I did it the hard way a month ago, updating XxX 10.4.10 to 10.4.11 on a (crappy) Gericom Laptop with 256mb of ram.
I backed up some kexts (I don't remember which ones) and mach_kernel (SSE2) that I knew had to be copied by looking on the net, fired up Software Update and I let it do its work. When it asked me to reboot, I didn't click anything (so it didn't reboot), I opened up a terminal and restored all of the files I backed up, then I fixed the permissions with Disk Utility.
It then rebooted fine (except waiting almost a quarter of hour for diskarb, but that only happens on the first reboot after the update), and installed back the Loginwindow and System Profiler patches from the XxX DVD.
Everything was fine after that.
I tried and succedeed by using pretty much the same procedure on a Dell Optiplex with a Socket 423 Pentium 4.


I wrote these scripts exactly so people wouldn't have to do it "the hard way". It's kind of hit-and-miss -- if you forget one file you can leave your system hosed.

Anyway, why are you copying all of the extensions from 10.4.10 on a 10.4.11? Most other kexts except for six or seven work perfectly fine, so you don't need that as you lose some updated drivers.
If you wanted to copy extensions just to be sure, you'd at most require a dozen IMHO.


Ok, which dozen? Are you sure those dozen would include the kexts used by my hardware? And the updated drivers are from Apple, updated for the Apple hardware. Most of us have to use special hacked kexts for at least some of our hardware, so the Apple updates kill the system. What if Apple updates the AC97 audio driver and I didn't include that one? Will my audio still work? (BTW, the answer for me is no, which I found out the hard way.) On any given computer, most of the kexts aren't even used because that computer doesn't include the hardware the kext supports. You can look in the System Profiler and see which kexts are currently being used by your system, but it only lists top-level kexts and not support kexts used by the top-level ones. The point is that by backing up all the kexts on your working system, you know it will work when you've done the update and restore your working kexts.

I tried figuring out which kexts I really needed using the System Profiler, and I thought I had figured it all out. There were about 20 total. I even wrote a script to backup and restore just those. Well, I evidently forgot an important one (possibly one of those support kexts used by one I included) because after that update attempt I got stuck in an endless reboot cycle.

All in all, I reinstalled 10.4.8 and tried to upgrade to 10.4.11 about 15 times before realizing that the simplest solution was probably the best solution. Anyway, as I said at the beginning of the first post, I went straight from 10.4.8 to 10.4.11 and the 2008-02 and 2008-03 security patches using these two scripts.

I just wanted to provide a working guide that used a simple method, so people wouldn't have to search all over trying to figure out which files they needed to back up and then forgetting one (or more).

#4
grunerd

grunerd

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
Trying this with uphuck 10.4.9 1.4a on AMD Athlon x64 3500+ (SSE2, Socket 939), ASUS A8V Deluxe, ATI Radeon 1950 XT (AGP, 512mb, VID=7280), 2 Gigs of Ram.

I'll keep my reply up2date.

Thanks in advice, Gruni.

#5
Tails92

Tails92

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Just Joined
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Ok, then. It's just that I haven't seen any issues on the machines I tried the hard procedure on, I guess that on other machines it may be different.

#6
Sevan

Sevan

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 60 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Omaha, Nebraska
  • Interests:Computers, Computer Programming (Software Development), Writing, Music Production, and Photograp...
I'm downloading and installing the 10.4.11 update as we speak. I'll post back when I get done.

#7
fyrekrig

fyrekrig

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 42 posts
Thanks very much for the guide. Worked perfectly for a 10.4.9 to 10.4.11 update.

Will this method also work for future Leopard updates?

#8
berchielli

berchielli

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 39 posts
Works just fine with me, 10.4.8 => 10.4.11

Tks

#9
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

Thanks very much for the guide. Worked perfectly for a 10.4.9 to 10.4.11 update.

Will this method also work for future Leopard updates?


Thanks for the success report. I'm not sure about Leopard, my laptop video card is currently unsupported in Leopard which makes using Leopard completely impractical for me (until I get a new laptop :( ). However, as we all have found, installing a system upgrade might mean having to re-install OS X when it borks your system, so it's always a crossing-your-fingers moment. Given that, it sure wouldn't hurt to try it. If you do, be sure to report in this thread. And if anyone does use these scripts to successfully upgrade Leopard, please let me know so I can update the instructions to reflect that it does work in leopard.

#10
dutchiee (=

dutchiee (=

    InsanelyMac Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
hmmm

i did exactly as ur guide said i get a kernel crash on bootup =S
i made a sys_backup folder then backup.sh with what u made, copied and pasted then i made the restore.sh and did the same thing. i then launched software update and installed the 10.4.11 update, when it asked to restart i opened the terminal from before and ran restore.sh then rebooted. Upon reboot i get a kernel crash.

any ideas?

(the machine was running 10.4.9 on a sse3 intel core duo 3.2ghz)

#11
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts
Sorry you're having a problem, I suspect you didn't follow some of the execution steps properly. In other words, you need to make the sys_backup folder, then in Terminal "cd" to that folder and create the two scripts inside that folder. Also, you MUST run backup.sh as root (by doing a "sudo -s" first) from Terminal within the sys_backup folder, and you MUST do so before you install the upgrade. Then, before rebooting, you MUST run restore.sh as root from Terminal also within the sys_backup folder. If you don't run the scripts within Terminal as root and in the sys_backup folder, it is unlikely that restore.sh will have any files to restore. I should really add some kind of checking in restore.sh to make sure it has found the backup files and warn if it doesn't, and to check for root as well. I'm kind of swamped at work right now, but I should be able to upload a new restore.sh script with that checking some time today.

If you didn't "sudo -s" before running the scripts, the backup script will still work, but it won't preserve the proper permission; however, restore.sh won't copy the files at all, since you have to be root to write where it's trying to write. I suggest you boot from your install DVD (actually hit ENTER when to boot timeout shows up, so that the installation will start -- don't worry, you won't overwrite anything). When you get past the Language selection and see the installation program, click on Utilities in the Menu Bar, then select Terminal. In Terminal "cd" to "/Volumes/<your disk>" where "<your disk>" is the name of the disk or partition where you've installed OS X. If you can't remember the name, just do an "ls /Volumes" to see the disks that are mounted, and you should see yours listed there. If it's not, close Terminal and open Utilities->Disk Utility. You can select your OS X disk and mount it with the Mount button, then exit Disk Utility and restart Terminal and "cd" to "/Volumes/<your disk>". Now you need to do some searching to find where the backup was made. First look in your home folder (/Volumes/<your disk>/Users/<your username>). If you double-clicked on backup.sh instead of running it from Terminal, it may have created the backup in the top of your home directory instead of within sys_backup. Look for a folder named "system.library.extensions" (note the dots instead of slashes). There should be a couple of other similarly named folders, and the backup and restore scripts should be there along side them. If not, find them and copy them there. Since this Terminal session has your logged in as root, running restore.sh should now work, and when it repairs permissions it will fix any that the non-root run of backup changed. Reboot and you should be fine.

#12
fyrekrig

fyrekrig

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 42 posts
Have now tried the script for a Leopard 10.5.2 to 10.5.3 update!

Unfortunately it does not work!

The main reason for not working is that the update installation only starts AFTER you restart, so the restore before pressing restart becomes totally irrelevant!

Luckily I had used NortonGhost/DOS to make a backup so I was back with my original install in no time.

#13
dutchiee (=

dutchiee (=

    InsanelyMac Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male
obijohn,

i did as u said and booted in the install dvd, pressed enter at the darwin boot loader, when Utilities>Terminal. Then i cd'd to my user directory and into the sys_backup folder where all the folders were. Ran the restore script and watched it error.. as well the script tries to copy from the hdd to the dvd as thats how its programmed; so i manually typed out the commands, eg cp -Rp system.library.extensions/* /Volumes/Hackintosh/System/Library/Extensions/ for all of the commands in the restore script, including the kernel, then once that had finished i ran diskutil and repaired the permissions and rebooted to a kernel crash again. all of the files were indeed in the backup folders, atleast all of the folders mentioned in ur script were found with files in them.

so i pretty much manually tried to restore but to no avail. When i have the chance ill try install leopard, unless u know of another way which doesnt involve me formatting.

Thanks for the help =]

#14
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

Have now tried the script for a Leopard 10.5.2 to 10.5.3 update!

Unfortunately it does not work!

The main reason for not working is that the update installation only starts AFTER you restart, so the restore before pressing restart becomes totally irrelevant!

Luckily I had used NortonGhost/DOS to make a backup so I was back with my original install in no time.


If the update installation only starts AFTER you restart, then you should be able to run the restore script after the update has finished installing, and then reboot. As I said, I don't have Leopard to test with, so thanks for trying! If you can, try it one more time, by still running the restore script before pressing restart (so you get your safe kernel back for the reboot), and then restore again after the update installation (after the reboot), and then manually reboot again after that. I'm fairly confident this procedure will work, but I won't know until someone tries.

#15
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

obijohn,

i did as u said and booted in the install dvd, pressed enter at the darwin boot loader, when Utilities>Terminal. Then i cd'd to my user directory and into the sys_backup folder where all the folders were. Ran the restore script and watched it error.. as well the script tries to copy from the hdd to the dvd as thats how its programmed; so i manually typed out the commands, eg cp -Rp system.library.extensions/* /Volumes/Hackintosh/System/Library/Extensions/ for all of the commands in the restore script, including the kernel, then once that had finished i ran diskutil and repaired the permissions and rebooted to a kernel crash again. all of the files were indeed in the backup folders, atleast all of the folders mentioned in ur script were found with files in them.

so i pretty much manually tried to restore but to no avail. When i have the chance ill try install leopard, unless u know of another way which doesnt involve me formatting.

Thanks for the help =]

Yes, I forgot that the script uses absolute paths instead of relative paths, which makes running it from Terminal as booted from the install disc not work. But manually doing the commands as you did will do the trick, assuming your files were backed up properly to begin with. With the files properly backed up and restored, there is no reason you shouldn't be able to boot. Really, none.

So, you're going to need to be a little more specific about the crash you're getting. When do you get the kernel crash? If it's before any kexts are loaded, you didn't backup your working kernel properly before running the system upgrade. Also, double-check the permissions of the kernel backup, and if necessary "sudo chmod 644" the backup kernel (if you didn't "sudo -s" before running the backup, the backup kernel won't have the right permissions). If it's crashing after trying to load some kexts (say, spewing something about ACPI for example), then you didn't backup your kexts properly before the update was installed. There's nothing magic about it -- if you've restored your old kernel and the old kexts, there's no reason it shouldn't boot.

Basically it boils down to something not getting backed up before the system upgrade ran (and now, if you have run the backup script after the system upgrade, it will just back up the new incompatible files, and not the old restored ones). Attach your backup.sh and restore.sh to this thread so I can see if there was problem when you created them.

Another possibility is if you ran backup.sh AFTER the upgrade installed, right before running restore.sh, you backed up the new incompatible files, not your old good ones. It's gotta be 0) sudo -s; 1) backup.sh; 2) system upgrade but don't restart; 3) restore.sh; 4) now reboot -- in exactly that order.

#16
fyrekrig

fyrekrig

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 42 posts

If the update installation only starts AFTER you restart, then you should be able to run the restore script after the update has finished installing, and then reboot. As I said, I don't have Leopard to test with, so thanks for trying! If you can, try it one more time, by still running the restore script before pressing restart (so you get your safe kernel back for the reboot), and then restore again after the update installation (after the reboot), and then manually reboot again after that. I'm fairly confident this procedure will work, but I won't know until someone tries.


I did a restore before restart but after a minute or so during the update install, the system freeze and will not reboot (gray screen)

#17
Buzz99

Buzz99

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Just Joined
  • Pip
  • 3 posts
Works magic on system updates. But, do I have to do restore after everything I update or just system updates ?

#18
dutchiee (=

dutchiee (=

    InsanelyMac Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 180 posts
  • Gender:Male

Yes, I forgot that the script uses absolute paths instead of relative paths, which makes running it from Terminal as booted from the install disc not work. But manually doing the commands as you did will do the trick, assuming your files were backed up properly to begin with. With the files properly backed up and restored, there is no reason you shouldn't be able to boot. Really, none.

So, you're going to need to be a little more specific about the crash you're getting. When do you get the kernel crash? If it's before any kexts are loaded, you didn't backup your working kernel properly before running the system upgrade. Also, double-check the permissions of the kernel backup, and if necessary "sudo chmod 644" the backup kernel (if you didn't "sudo -s" before running the backup, the backup kernel won't have the right permissions). If it's crashing after trying to load some kexts (say, spewing something about ACPI for example), then you didn't backup your kexts properly before the update was installed. There's nothing magic about it -- if you've restored your old kernel and the old kexts, there's no reason it shouldn't boot.

Basically it boils down to something not getting backed up before the system upgrade ran (and now, if you have run the backup script after the system upgrade, it will just back up the new incompatible files, and not the old restored ones). Attach your backup.sh and restore.sh to this thread so I can see if there was problem when you created them.

Another possibility is if you ran backup.sh AFTER the upgrade installed, right before running restore.sh, you backed up the new incompatible files, not your old good ones. It's gotta be 0) sudo -s; 1) backup.sh; 2) system upgrade but don't restart; 3) restore.sh; 4) now reboot -- in exactly that order.


hmm i suspected the kernel aswell, so i ran the installer dvd and reinstalled the kernel of the dvd *original kernel* after checking the permissions of the backuped ones.. after i rebooted it still kernel errored and yeah i know thereotically speaking it should boot but i dont know why it isnt..

in the verbose print out it just says panic at cpu 0 caller 0x001A496B, i mean i dont make much of this stuff so yeah.. other then that there is no reference of a kext error or anything besides somethign saying " kernel loadable modules in backtrace (with dependicies): com.apple.driver.AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement(1.6.7)@0x24a96000"

thats all it mentions before stating the kernel version and the creator ( 8.9.1 by ToH ) other then that i cant see anything else. Is there anything else you'd be looking for? oh, and i cant copy the script here as the computer is on doesnt boot.. but it is a replica of what u posted above (triple checked both), and yes i did run it before i applied the update, im 100% sure of this. I might try and just install leopard, although im not sure if it works on Intel Core Duo's (not core 2 duo) so yeah.

#19
obijohn

obijohn

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 38 posts

Works magic on system updates. But, do I have to do restore after everything I update or just system updates ?

Just System Updates and Security Patches. Regular software updates don't need anything restored. The only software update that I'm aware of which installs a new kernel is Time Machine, but us Tigers don't have to worry about that one.

hmm i suspected the kernel aswell, so i ran the installer dvd and reinstalled the kernel of the dvd *original kernel* after checking the permissions of the backuped ones.. after i rebooted it still kernel errored and yeah i know thereotically speaking it should boot but i dont know why it isnt..in the verbose print out it just says panic at cpu 0 caller 0x001A496B, i mean i dont make much of this stuff so yeah.. other then that there is no reference of a kext error or anything besides somethign saying " kernel loadable modules in backtrace (with dependicies): com.apple.driver.AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement(1.6.7)@0x24a96000"

Get back into a Terminal from the install DVD and delete the AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext, in the /Volumes/<your_disk>/System/Library/Extensions/ folder. Delete the /Volumes/<your_disk>/System/Library/Extensions.mkext and /Volumes/<your_disk>/System/Library/Extensions.kextcache files and reboot. However, before it gets a chance to start the Darwin boot hit F8 a couple of times until you get the "boot:" prompt and add the cpus=1 boot flag. Your original distro may have removed the AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement kext automatically, since it causes crashes like you describe in certain configurations. It's possible that the 10.4.11 upgrade you applied re-installed that kext. That's a very common kext to have to remove, so I may need to add some checking in the scripts; for example creating a tiny log file that notes whether it exists during the backup stage, and then during the restore state checking the log file to see whether it should be removed after the upgrade has run.Right now this is my best guess as to what your problem might be.

thats all it mentions before stating the kernel version and the creator ( 8.9.1 by ToH ) other then that i cant see anything else. Is there anything else you'd be looking for?

I've done this upgrade procedure on 3 different machines, upgrading from 10.4.9 to 10.4.11 on one, and 10.4.8 to 10.4.11 on the other two. I also installed both security updates on all 3 machines using the scripts, and didn't have a single problem with any one of them during the whole process. So I'm absolutely convinced that something went out of the ordinary during your upgrade, such as re-installing that IntelCPU kext I mentioned above.

oh, and i cant copy the script here as the computer is on doesnt boot.. but it is a replica of what u posted above (triple checked both), and yes i did run it before i applied the update, im 100% sure of this. I might try and just install leopard, although im not sure if it works on Intel Core Duo's (not core 2 duo) so yeah.

Before you install Leopard, try what I suggested above. Even if you end up wanting to install Leopard anyway, I'd like to know if this was indeed your problem so I can address it in the scripts.

#20
sleeper42

sleeper42

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 8 posts
This worked great for me. I used the JaS 10.4.8 image on a Dell GX270.

However, I can't seem to "connect to server" anymore. Any ideas on what I can do to regain this function? I'm trying to connect to an SMB share on a Windows box on the network.

When I try to connect it prompts for the password, but after entering the password I get an error: "Sorry, the operation could not be completed because an unexpected error occurred (Error code -50)." It used to work before I updated to 10.4.11.

The other minor thing I noticed is that the finder crashes when I go to "About This Mac"... but, that's not a big deal if I can't get that working. :)

Any help would be appreciated.
Thanks!
-Morgan





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

© 2014 InsanelyMac  |   News  |   Forum  |   Downloads  |   OSx86 Wiki  |   Mac Netbook  |   PHP hosting by CatN  |   Designed by Ed Gain  |   Logo by irfan  |   Privacy Policy