Jump to content

Mac Pro 9.6 GHz processor. Madness.


komodomitsu
 Share

10 posts in this topic

Recommended Posts

Xgrid.

 

Beside your MHz/GHz confusion, remember also that the Mac Pro has 2 quad-core CPUs at 3.2GHz. That's 3.2x4=12.8 x 2=25.6GHz per machine, so with 3 3.2GHz quad core Mac Pros, you'd have 76.8GHz of CPU power. That's 8000 times 9.6MHz...

 

You're also talking about $13,197 of computer though...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No need to leave ;)

 

Now, I want some Mac Pros :lol: Actually, a small rack of 8-core XServes would probably be more space-efficient. Shame they don't sell the cheaper cluster node versions with a single HDD bay and no optical drive any more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

its possible.. not with a mac board tho. Yes with normal server motherboards.. it can be connected with ethernet and some software. With normal server boards it would be way cheaper to (4k instead of 40k)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Does clustering works on Hackintoshes, anyone tried? Either with Xgrid, or Condor? Both appear to be free. For those new to the concept, this allows CPU power of several Macs to be pooled, they run as one big superfast computer from a single controlling Mac.

 

For people who want to upgrade old G5s like me, this might be the ticket. If I don't need to buy a monitor & peripherals for the HackMac (if clustering is really all it's cracked up to be) I can spend the money on a box with 2-3 Intel i7 920's. That could accelerate my G5, like, almost 20x... :)

 

Did anyone try this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

not to really be the bummer here, but aren't Xeons and Itaniums the only ones from intel that support multi-processor configuration?

 

I could be stupid and wrong, but you can just throw the normal i7 line processors onto a multi-socket server board, you have to use Xeons (Itaniums are more corporate level stuff).

 

I'm just saying this because the last time I saw a "normal" dual CPU board was back in the days of Pentium 3. I've seen some Socket 370 board with 2 sockets (could actually go out monday, and pick one up and bring it home, not being used by the school that has it).

 

But as expected, the Pentium 3 Xeon's were faster, larger cache...the works.

 

Also, i could be wrong, but it's not really like adding up the GHz of all the cores, a better way of defining the power would be a floating point cursor test.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...