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iAtkos l2 first boot extremely slow...


skylinepkr
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This is my first post and i do apologize if i forget to give some kind of information as i know this can be frustrating when trying to help. I am proud of myself! I taught myself all this for about two months before i successfully created a dual boot environment (windows 7 and lion if you care haha).

 

Before I go any further, here is my build:

 

Mobo:

GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3

 

CPU:

Intel Core i5-2500 Sandy Bridge

 

Graphics:

EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1gb

 

DDR3

16gb Corsair DDR 3 2100

 

WD 2 TB - Partitioned

-125 gb OS X

-125 gb Windows 7

-1.7 tb Data

 

So I researched some guides and the way i got to the installer from the iAtkos L2 disk was using the command flags

-v cpus=1

 

After erasing the OS X partition I installed lion with the following customizations:

  • Chameleon 2.1
  • Built-In Ethernet
  • Original Apple Boot Logo
  • Fake SMC
  • Disabler
  • RTC
  • EvOreBoot
  • AHCI Sata
  • jmicron IDE
  • Voodoo HDA 2.73
  • USB 3.0
  • PS/2
  • NVEnabler
  • Wired Realtek Network thing

So the installation proceeds and reboots as expected but once it boots to the welcome portion of the first time boot for lion, it is extremely slow. Everytime I click something the rainbow spinner comes up and I usually have to click continue around 10 times before it actually registers the button press. Then it thinks some more and it keeps doing that. I got as far as the enter your apple id part and that alone took about an hour.

 

I have searched online and have not really found anyone else who has the exact problem as me so now im really confused as to why it may be doing this.

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After erasing the OS X partition I installed lion with the following customizations:

  • Chameleon 2.1
  • Built-In Ethernet
  • Original Apple Boot Logo
  • Fake SMC
  • Disabler
  • RTC
  • EvOreBoot
  • AHCI Sata
  • jmicron IDE
  • Voodoo HDA 2.73
  • USB 3.0
  • PS/2
  • NVEnabler
  • Wired Realtek Network thing

 

Wow, U really threw everything including the kitchen sink at that install :) Do you really need a legacy IDE driver, PS/2 keyboard? So I assume you're not still using cpus=1 while booting. Try installing with almost none of that stuff and just what is needed to get started. You can add things later, but do it one at a time or it's impossible to troubleshoot. Voodoo audio is trash unless u have VIA audio, then that's your only choice other wise don't use it-eitherway don't install it during initial setup. Just use fakesmc and try nullCPUpowermanagement instead of disabler if it's on your distro, which is a whole nother ball of wax I'll leave alone for now. half the other stuff you either won't ever need, or don't need to get OSX booted, and that's what comes first. If you get no picture without NVEnabler than use it right away too. Probably don't need ahci.kext and should work native. Add what u need as you go, making sure your machine is still bootable after each one, boot it twice even so your not just loading from caches. Then you may need some trial and error on a few things, initially using cpus=1 may help, but temporary until u get a patched DSDT installed which should be easy to find for your board. Less is more, fakesmc and nullcpupoermanagement.kext are the only must have for initial setup, the latter usually being removed after setup completed(you'll wan't to keep it until your ready to try speedstepping-wait!)

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Wow, U really threw everything including the kitchen sink at that install :) Do you really need a legacy IDE driver, PS/2 keyboard? So I assume you're not still using cpus=1 while booting. Try installing with almost none of that stuff and just what is needed to get started. You can add things later, but do it one at a time or it's impossible to troubleshoot. Voodoo audio is trash unless u have VIA audio, then that's your only choice other wise don't use it-eitherway don't install it during initial setup. Just use fakesmc and try nullCPUpowermanagement instead of disabler if it's on your distro, which is a whole nother ball of wax I'll leave alone for now. half the other stuff you either won't ever need, or don't need to get OSX booted, and that's what comes first. If you get no picture without NVEnabler than use it right away too. Probably don't need ahci.kext and should work native. Add what u need as you go, making sure your machine is still bootable after each one, boot it twice even so your not just loading from caches. Then you may need some trial and error on a few things, initially using cpus=1 may help, but temporary until u get a patched DSDT installed which should be easy to find for your board. Less is more, fakesmc and nullcpupoermanagement.kext are the only must have for initial setup, the latter usually being removed after setup completed(you'll wan't to keep it until your ready to try speedstepping-wait!)

 

Okay I will definitely try that. A lot of the stuff I still don't even know how to do like creating a custom DSDT and installing kexts after successful install. I am pretty experienced and am an advanced user with windows but am new to Mac (Which is why im here trying to dual boot now :) ). I am not home right now, but I will definitely give that a shot. Last time i installed kexts, booting failed and i just reinstalled without tampering haha

Anyways thanks for the quick reply. Will update later!

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This is the problem with the iatkos method. everyone tries to throw everything at it and hope it works.

 

A bottom up method such as u n i b e a s t (google it without spaces) then m u l t i b e a s t if a far better way of getting a solid os x setup.

 

iatkos is ok to test os x out with but not good for everyday use.

 

Learn to use the terminal commands for basic directory navigation, copying files & deleting files. This way you can delete kexts from the installer if it won't boot after you've installed new ones.

 

It might take a bit more learning and playing about but if you want to learn anything about building a good stable hack you should be doing install with an app store version (u n i b e a s t et al) as opposed to a hacked one (iatkos etc)

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the distros or beastie thing suffer from the same problem with installing too much junk and not ever learining what any of it is, especially the "slightly simpler beastie" method that almost always does more harm than good by assuming the same pack of kexts and files is perfect for everyone and it only takes one wrong kext to cause a kernel panic, leaving a new user, well...Paniced I guess.. I will say though that as maybe a lesser of two evils, at least the beastie has decent descriptions of the kexts and trys to warn not to use 2 that do the same thing, the fact that you are already booted into a installed os by the time you ever even use it speaks for it's self(you don't really need much to boot). Since you're probably gona end up at bonyflacsx69 anywayz, might as well sign up and grab a patched dsdt from the data base, then forget your password :)

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Okay so I did as you instructed, only using the absolute minimum to get started and I still face the same issue unfortunately... Its just really slow and takes approximately 3 minutes to hit continue. It's fine during the installer though.

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Don't bash the new guy guys,the list of stuff he "threw at it" isn't too much at all,few of those lines are just bootloader options etc..i've done hundreds of dozens of installs,and in 95% cases,even if something isn't needed,it won't hurt to be there,just won't be loaded.Sometimes,options are mega limited,an individual just can't install any other way but a distro.That being said,didn't hear anybody having this problem for a long time. Something is either repeatedly crashing in the background and bringing the system to a halt.OR,it could be the Spotlight indexer,it was the main cause of problems like these as i recall.Go to preferences,Spotlight,and drag all NTFS partitions you have on the drive in the list to ignore.That might fix it :)

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Don't bash the new guy guys,the list of stuff he "threw at it" isn't too much at all,few of those lines are just bootloader options etc..i've done hundreds of dozens of installs,and in 95% cases,even if something isn't needed,it won't hurt to be there,just won't be loaded.Sometimes,options are mega limited,an individual just can't install any other way but a distro.That being said,didn't hear anybody having this problem for a long time. Something is either repeatedly crashing in the background and bringing the system to a halt.OR,it could be the Spotlight indexer,it was the main cause of problems like these as i recall.Go to preferences,Spotlight,and drag all NTFS partitions you have on the drive in the list to ignore.That might fix it :)

 

Thanks for being so kind! =)

I don't think i can get to preferences because I can't get to the desktop at all. It gets slow after i install mac os and it reboots. The first screen that comes us is welcome pick your language then pick your location, then keyboard, etc. etc and to get through those three steps takes about 30 minutes. Every time i click the rainbow spinner comes on and then then i have to click continue again because it didnt register the click before. Seems to me it does a lot of thinking for nothing haha

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Ah,okay,i was in a mess of tabs,didnt understand you didn't even make it to the desk.Silly me.. So,the second time you reinstalled with lesser options,which ones did you use?It could be a problem with nvenabler,you can just leave that out and let it boot in minimal res.Then you can try your options later such as GraphicsEnabler=Yes boot flag etc.Also,make sure you boot -v and watch for possible errors and problems during startup.There is always the option of safe boot -x so you can at least get to the desktop and troubleshoot further and easier.Then you can sort out editing smbios values and your DSDT etc etc.

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No bashing, just some good natured banter, we are here to help after all :) My point being that starting with minimal options and adding to as needed makes trouble shooting any issues so much easier as you can see the effects/or lack of, that each change causes. I've had extreme slowness and pinwheeling problems on my real MacBook due to corrupt log files and/or file permissions. Double check that sata kext your using supports your southbridge. Since the installer boots, you can go back into and use disk utility from there to repair permissions on your drive, shouldn't be needed but can't hurt. Lion can be a bit tricky to get installed in comparison to Snow Leopard, especially with it's picky caches. So getting things running with SL first and getting a feel for what your hardware needs to run it first, then upgrading to Lion may be worth looking into.

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Okay that makes sense. So yesterday I tried to do what .lostandstupid suggested (loading in to safe mode using the -x boot flag) and it worked! it was fast and normal like. So once I get to the desktop, what do I want to do? I understand I want to troubleshoot and find out what is causing the lag however I am completely new to Mac OS. Or should I change the spotlight settings from preferences first as stated above?

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