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Install 10.5.5 Delta over 10.5.4 Intel (AMD users now have a method too in this guide)


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The Comprehensive Mac OS X 10.5.4 to 10.5.5 Guide for non-EFI Mac’s

 

This guide will help you install 10.5.5 delta update over your 10.5.4 system. This works on hackintosh’s that don’t have any EFI installed or have EFI installed but not an EFI kernel, SMBIOS or System kexts. Also, below at the end of the guide is an amendment for AMD users.

 

First, you will want to download the Delta update from Apple: Here

 

Next, make sure to backup your custom extensions from /System/Library/Extensions/ (appleSMBIOS.kext, System.kext, etc). Drag and drop each one to the desktop.

 

After you finish that, you will want to backup your kernel. Open terminal and enter the collowing:

cd /
sudo cp /mach_kernel ~/Desktop

Make sure to enter your password when terminal prompts you to.

 

Now that you’ve backed up all of your stuff, you will want to enter the following into terminal:

sudo –s

This will put you in root, and your shell will now be bash, and then enter the following:

while sleep 1; do rm -rf /System/Library/Extensions/AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext; done

What that does is simply remove AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext from the Extensions folder as soon as it’s created and loaded. If it’s not removed, it will be installed and immediately loaded, which will cause you to get a kernel panic. This is not good. At the end of the post, there is an attached kext which will allow you to not have to worry about AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext ever again, installed or not. It prevents it from ever being loaded. This way, if you want, you can remove the kext yourself at any time.

 

Now, run the update installer. When it is finished, do not press restart. Ignore the window for the time being and proceed to place your kexts back, along with the kernel.

 

Press Ctrl+c and start a new terminal session.

 

Kernel:

sudo cp ~/Desktop/mach_kernel /

Then,

sudo chmod –R 644 /mach_kernel

 

Now, drag and drop all your backup kexts, and be sure to run:

sudo chmod –R 755

and

sudo chown –R root:wheel

on all the kexts you placed back into the Extensions folder, then run:

sudo rm –rf /System/Library/Extensions.mkext

 

Now open this file in Textedit

/System/InstallAtStartup/scripts/1

 

Find the string

/System/Library/Extensions/Dont Steal Mac OS X.kext

 

And replace with this string

/System/Library/Extensions/dsmos.kext

or r3d3.kext or AppleDecrypt.kext if you use one of them, then save it.

 

You may not have that in the script, however, like I didn’t, so if you don’t find the string, don’t worry about it.

 

You can now close the installer and reboot. Your machine will start up, do it’s thing, then reboot again. You will then be prompted with the login screen or your desktop.

 

Enjoy!

 

AMENDMENT: AMD users, look here.

 

IntelCPUPMDisabler.kext.zip

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Now that you’ve backed up all of your stuff, you will want to enter the following into terminal:

sudo –s

This will put you in root, and your shell will now be bash, and then enter the following:

while sleep 1; do rm -rf /System/Library/Extensions/AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext; done

What that does is simply remove AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext from the Extensions folder as soon as it’s created and loaded. If it’s not removed, it will be installed and immediately loaded, which will cause you to get a kernel panic. This is not good. At the end of the post, there is an attached kext which will allow you to not have to worry about AppleIntelCPUPowerManagement.kext ever again, installed or not. It prevents it from ever being loaded. This way, if you want, you can remove the kext yourself at any time.

 

Fantastic! I wondered why the installer kernel panics on me! Thank you for this!

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Okay, so I managed to get a fully working 10.5.5 AMD install using iDeneb 1.1 as a basis.

 

Basically, I followed the steps above, with some amendments (please excuse the relative simplicity and vagueness, this is going on recent memory and lack of OSX86 knowledge):

 

- I used Zephyroth's Software Update to download, scan (and patch for AMD) the 10.5.5 update. Before running this, I set the IntelCPUManagement.kext terminal script, and the kext linked to stop it from loading.

- Instead of command-lining the Kernel and Extension backup and restores, I used OSX86Tools (just a cracking little app, that) to do this all with a few button presses. When ASU informed me the 10.5.5 package had been patched and installed, I went into OSX86Tools and restored my extensions and kernels (and repaired permissions and cleaned the extension cache for good measure).

- I rebooted once with -v -f which did some brief updating and rebooted. I then booted with -v -f again, and got the aforementioned "Blue screen with cursor" problem. I shut down the machine, and booted with -v -x which took me into safe mode and let me log in. Here, I went into System/Library/Extensions/ and deleted NVInject.kext. I then installed the new 10.5.5 NVInstaller (http://scottdangel.com/blog/?page_id=20) which comes packaged with EFIStudio. Once the drivers were installed, EFIStudio let me select my graphics card (7800GT 256mb in this case) and wrote it to the boot.plist file (or something similar).

- I then booted up OSX86Tools again, cleared the extension cache and rebooted. Booting with -v, it appeared to load the new NVInstaller drivers (and not NVInjector) and took me to my login screen where I was amazed to find a fully working (so far) 10.5.5 installation.

 

So there we have it.

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Awesome, I am glad to hear that even though it was a more involved process, my guide still worked overall for you.

 

I wrote this mostly because there is only ONE guide written on another forum, and a lot of people were asking how to install.

 

I will amend with a link to your post for AMD users. Thanks for the information!

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Awesome, I am glad to hear that even though it was a more involved process, my guide still worked overall for you.

 

I wrote this mostly because there is only ONE guide written on another forum, and a lot of people were asking how to install.

 

I will amend with a link to your post for AMD users. Thanks for the information!

 

Thanks, this was the result of about 12-hours worth of hard-drive jiggling and Time Machine backups, so I am just chuffed to have a working AMD 10.5.5 install.

 

What I would say, is that the small list I made above is not a definitely-gonna-work-for-sure-uber-guide, it's just what I did. Everyone uses different Hackintosh distributions and different hardware, so for some people perhaps just using Software Update will work outright. I say make a nice Time Machine backup, and if anything goes wrong then just do a clean reinstall using your Leopard DVD and restore using TM.

 

To summise, if you have an AMD/NVidia system like mine, my amendments will most probably work if your 10.5.4 installation was working perfectly beforehand, and you sucessfully backed up and restored your kernel and extensions. The problem I came up against was my install not wanting to play ball with NVInject after the 10.5.5 update, and installing NVInstaller via safe mode seemed to do the trick nicely.

 

Rambling over. Your mileage may vary, basically. I'd wait for one of the big guns to come out with a pre-patched 10.5.5 installer if you're not prepared to get the old hands dirty and restore from your Time Machine about eighteen times!

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Okay, so I managed to get a fully working 10.5.5 AMD install using iDeneb 1.1 as a basis.

 

Basically, I followed the steps above, with some amendments (please excuse the relative simplicity and vagueness, this is going on recent memory and lack of OSX86 knowledge):

 

- I used Zephyroth's Software Update to download, scan (and patch for AMD) the 10.5.5 update. Before running this, I set the IntelCPUManagement.kext terminal script, and the kext linked to stop it from loading.

- Instead of command-lining the Kernel and Extension backup and restores, I used OSX86Tools (just a cracking little app, that) to do this all with a few button presses. When ASU informed me the 10.5.5 package had been patched and installed, I went into OSX86Tools and restored my extensions and kernels (and repaired permissions and cleaned the extension cache for good measure).

- I rebooted once with -v -f which did some brief updating and rebooted. I then booted with -v -f again, and got the aforementioned "Blue screen with cursor" problem. I shut down the machine, and booted with -v -x which took me into safe mode and let me log in. Here, I went into System/Library/Extensions/ and deleted NVInject.kext. I then installed the new 10.5.5 NVInstaller (http://scottdangel.com/blog/?page_id=20) which comes packaged with EFIStudio. Once the drivers were installed, EFIStudio let me select my graphics card (7800GT 256mb in this case) and wrote it to the boot.plist file (or something similar).

- I then booted up OSX86Tools again, cleared the extension cache and rebooted. Booting with -v, it appeared to load the new NVInstaller drivers (and not NVInjector) and took me to my login screen where I was amazed to find a fully working (so far) 10.5.5 installation.

 

So there we have it.

 

 

I can vouch for this... worked perfectly on my NForce5 AMD system. Time to go take a breather now! Much thanks man.

 

hackintosh.png

;)

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