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I want to build a hack mini.


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so its just barebones? For osx to run properly, you need a dual core or above processor or use another kernel for it which could be a pain for a novice user... So say a E5300 for less than $90... Im not sure what your chances are, as intel video can be a absolute pain to get working, ive not had any experience with it though... Can't say if it will work or not... but the custom google could help a bit....

 

http://www.google.com/coop/cse?cx=00948655...297:e41g72sr-ba

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Intel X3100 graphics is I think supported as it was used on a few MacBooks, and the first gen MacBook Air. Shuttle however describes it's graphics as GMA 3100 so you might not be able to get it going.

 

The Shuttle is also significantly larger than a Mac Mini. Trying to build a usable super small system is hard as the smallest boards are all Atom based. Even the smallest PC cases are larger than the Mini - unless you go with a pre-built nettop like the Asus EeeBox, but those like all Atoms are way under powered.

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The onboard graphics won't work for OSX, but it does have a PCIe x16 slot, so you can just use a compatible graphics card.

 

A lot of Shuttle models work great for Hackintosh- that one specifically I'm not sure about.

 

Also the main thing that would concern me, is that by the time all is said and done, the cost of it would approach an entry level Mac Mini anyway. Try adding CPU, RAM, drives, video card to that and see what even the basics of each ring in at. Granted though, depending on the component stats it could also spank an entry level Mac Mini.

 

It's not so radically smaller than a microATX board in a smaller mATX case to justify the added expense, IMHO.

 

Another thing: if you're going to go with socket 775 parts still, look into the E6300 vs. the E5300. Unless the E5300 is significantly cheaper (for example, on newegg it's currently only $10 less) then it's almost what I'd call foolish to not go for the E6300. This chip is much nicer since it has several 'little things' that add up to a lot of improvement, notably: faster core speed, 1066 (vs 800) FSB, and VT support. The performance benefits of the later two in particular are well worth $10.

 

An E6300 paired with a decent compatible mATX board like the Gigabyte G31M (or G41M)-ES2L makes for a very nice hack for the money.

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