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Crucial M500 960GB 2.5-inch Internal SSD now €550.79

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#1
Alessandro17

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http://www.crucial.c...E=CT960M500SSD1

I have been waiting for something like this, a large SSD for a 'reasonable' price.

I think this would be the best upgrade for my MacBook Pro early 2011.

I'll wait about a year, hoping that prices go further down and that others will enter the market with something similar.

#2
theconnactic

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That's great news - and yet a huge price. Also waiting for competition making things affordable.

All the best!

#3
Alessandro17

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They have already gone a long way toward lowering prices. The OWC 960GB one costs $1,099,99: http://eshop.macsale...Solid_State_Pro
Apple makes available the 768GB one as an upgrade from 256GB for $700.00 on its Retina 15" MacBook Pro

A review, also showing how much cheaper SSDs have become in a few years: http://techreport.co...00-ssd-reviewed

#4
Rampage Dev

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Still not worth it... Just my thought...

If you read the science publication on the breakdown of SSD's over 60 GB and how they decay at a uncontrollable rate you will find that SSD's are temporary. Big SSD's are just a bad idea.

#5
theconnactic

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Yeah, Rampage, i worry about that issue too. The short life of swapping files, seems to me the current use of SSDs - system drives - are the best, and technologies like fusion drives will make for faster storage devices. Or else they go a step further in the solid state drive tech itself - which is quite likely, specially with heavy market competition (which is still to come) and hugely positive consumer perception, which is already a fact (even inside more tech-savvy niches, like this forum, where more people are likely to know the current flaws of this technology, SSDs are a highly desired goodie).

All the best!

#6
Alessandro17

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In the meantime, we will soon have new hybrid Hard Drives, said to be much faster than the existing Momentus XT:

http://reviews.cnet....7-35567266.html

http://ces.cnet.com/...pm-laptop-hdds/

I am looking forward to seeing those SSHDs reviewed, and how much faster they really are when compared with standard HDDs.

What I don't understand is why these new hybrid drives will come with still so little solid-state memory.

#7
3.14r2

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What I don't understand is why these new hybrid drives will come with still so little solid-state memory.

IMO the SSD section acts more like a gigantic cache, where only most frequently use files are stored. It's not like OS "lives" there.

I've had an opportunity to play with Toshiba 17" notebook with i7 and two HDDs. One of these HHD was a combo SSD/HDD 750GB drive (Seagate). Can't really say how faster the PC is compared to the usual SATA HDD, but it certainly is faster. I guess around 30% Max. Most likely a pure SSD would still be noticeably faster.

#8
Alessandro17

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3.14r2

What is your opinion about large SSDs deteriorating very fast?

#9
3.14r2

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3.14r2

What is your opinion about large SSDs deteriorating very fast?

I haven't had yet an opportunity to play with SSD larger then 128GB (MacBook Air) or 60GB (Vertex). Can't really say much about it. I guess the more complex a device is, the greater chances of troubles/issues are. AFAIK apart the issues with memory chips as such, there should be pretty sophisticated wear levelling/fault tolerance algorithms which in turn results the more complex software/firmware. With a complex software used, there could be more chances of things not working properly.

SSD is more or less new technology (compared to the "classic" HDDs). IMO it should yet come a long way before it becomes the real mainstream. Although it is a rapidly growing field, the amount SSD in use, can hardly be compared to the amount of HDDs used (probably even to SCSI ones). Therefore there is simply not enough information on how SSD wear out in real life scenarios. With growth of user base, we can probably face some unpleasant facts. But again as the technology is quite new, issues are expected.

IMO the key feature of SSD (ATM at least) is fast I/O and silent work (and power consumption maybe for some). With this point in mind, the bigger capacity doesn't matter much. IMO there is no big difference whenever a rarely accessed data is stored on fast drive or on slow drive (at least outside of corporate data banks i.e for the average PC user). It may vary from user to user, but as for me, most data stored on the HHD (both desktop and notebook) I have, are a rarely used files, which nevertheless are the files I'd prefer to keep handy.

Not that I'm a HDD recovery specialist, but still... :) In a HDD there are few parts that can brake or wear off. Most these can be replaced to recover date from a broken disk (take a Shuttle Columbia's hard drive date recovery for instance; I wander how much they charged NASA for that :) ). With SSDs, it's hard to say how "recoverable" these are, as there simply could be not enough statistics. I'm not saying it's impossible, but still.

#10
level70steve

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Does SSD breakdowns depend on the manufacturers who built it from the beginning?! Or am I not reading this right?! If SSD breakdowns do become a major factor in overall retail, I would want to see more reasonable prices as I believe these is too high. Perhaps the future will explain that SSD technology can wipe out the spinning HDD's the same way compact discs wiped out audio cassettes, but I do not know how this type of game will be played.

#11
yoyostring

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Here is a great thread about testing the endurance of SSDs:
http://www.xtremesys...ce-25nm-Vs-34nm





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