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hardware compatability and boot loader advice


pauljb
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Dear all,

just need some advice on the above, this is my second time trying to install is x. But first time bout year ago now it failed due to my hardware. Which is a quad core intel , 2gb ram, data HD, and IDE dvdrw. Problem was with my IDE disk drive and the jmicron controller on my asus p5kc mobo. Just wondering can I get round these problems now with new images and guides?

 

Also can I preinstall a boot loader as lasttime os x failed to install and I couldn't get back to windows and had to reformat!

 

Any advice and or links to good guides would be great thanks

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Also can I preinstall a boot loader as lasttime os x failed to install and I couldn't get back to windows and had to reformat!

 

I can't help with your first question, but as to the second, the best way to deal with Windows boot problems after removing OSx86 (or most other OSes) is to prepare by backing up your MBR, or at least the first 440 bytes of it. You can do this in OS X with a command like this:

 

dd if=/dev/disk0 of=backup.mbr bs=440 count=1

 

Change "backup.mbr" to whatever backup file you'd like, and save the file on a USB flash drive, floppy disk, or whatever. You can then restore your original boot loader by reversing this command (using "if=backup.mbr of=/dev/disk0" in the above), either before rebooting to remove OS X or from a command prompt from the OSx86 install disc. When restoring, be absolutely positive that you use the correct file; if you use the wrong file and omit or mistype the bs or count options, you'll wipe out your disk's partitions! Alternatively, you could use a Linux emergency boot CD/DVD, but you'll need to use a Linux disk identifier, such as /dev/hda or /dev/sda, rather than the Mac-style /dev/disk0.

 

There are other ways to do this, too. Some disk partitioning tools enable you to re-write the MBR's boot loader from a version stored by the partitioning tool, but details differ. The old DOS FDISK program could do it with its "/MBR" option, but I believe there are differences between the MBR code used by DOS and that used by modern versions of Windows. There must be Windows-native tools that will do the job, but I'm not familiar enough with Windows utilities to point you to one.

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