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Bare Metal Hypervisor - Run Win7 + Ubuntu + OSX at the same time


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#21
OnePlane

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I use Debian Squeeze, but that might be too complex to begin with. Fedora is much easier.

The MSI installer problem is simple: the package author doesn't want you installing it on server versions.

#22
Donk

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I use Debian Squeeze, but that might be too complex to begin with. Fedora is much easier.

The MSI installer problem is simple: the package author doesn't want you installing it on server versions.


The MSI problem is isn't due to the server version of Windows it is detecting Hyper-V. You cannot have 2 hypervisors installed at the same time due to the Intel VT-x and AMD SVM architectures. So no VMware on a Hyper-V server. Even if you hack it to install the hypervisor has checks and won't run. I have a 2008 R2 system running Workstation 7.1.4 just fine, but no Hyper-V installed.

Looks like a dumb error message problem, but I can check the installers if you want to dig deeper.

#23
MSoK

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The MSI problem is isn't due to the server version of Windows it is detecting Hyper-V. You cannot have 2 hypervisors installed at the same time due to the Intel VT-x and AMD SVM architectures. So no VMware on a Hyper-V server. Even if you hack it to install the hypervisor has checks and won't run. I have a 2008 R2 system running Workstation 7.1.4 just fine, but no Hyper-V installed.

Looks like a dumb error message problem, but I can check the installers if you want to dig deeper.

Donk,

Doh, stupid me, should have thought about the dual Hypervisor situation, removed Hyper-v and all is well on the Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 and VMware Workstation 7.1.4 front. I must have been getting confused, easily done, between the error messages being given by the VMware install and errors I have seen due to install programs running version checks, like Nero and BlueTooth.

Your insight appreciated as always, MSoK.

I use Debian Squeeze, but that might be too complex to begin with. Fedora is much easier.

The MSI installer problem is simple: the package author doesn't want you installing it on server versions.

OnePlane,

Thanks for the info, I will have a look at Fedora, I had downloaded Debian 6.0.1a. Any additional pointers appreciated.

#24
OnePlane

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With mainstream linux distributions, you don't need to download installer binaries or other stuff -- everything comes with the repositories made for those distributions. Debian uses a system with APT and DPKG, whilst Fedora uses RPM.

To install anything, just open de software manager, search for the things you need, select them, press install, and it will automagically happen. Everything will be downloaded, checked and installed.

Sometimes a new kernel or a kernel module is required to run new software, in which case you might need to reboot. Linux rarely needs to be rebooted, that might be good to know. You might want to consider something like virt-manager, it's supposed to be a nice GUI frontend for virtualisation systems (like KVM, Xen etc). I use manual setups myself (allows to fine-tune everything).

#25
wizzord

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Is having two disks absolutely necessary to run Xen (or KVM) on a notebook? Or could partitions or LVM used with an SSD work, too?

#26
OnePlane

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Is having two disks absolutely necessary to run Xen (or KVM) on a notebook? Or could partitions or LVM used with an SSD work, too?


Yes, that would work. But bear in mind, a storage unit like a hard disk drive has a limit on how fast it can do things. If you use one system, that system can take that limit to itselt. If you use three systems, you might only get 1/3 of the speed. However, usually you are only active in one environment. So if you have two or three systems running, and only one is actually being used, it might work pretty well. I have set-up single-disk virtualisation systems (where performance wasn't the issue), and it does work if you don't task all systems at once.

#27
samurai

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Hey OnePlane,
Awesome stuff, iv been following this thread since the start of the year hoping someone would come up with a good straight forward guide or solution, to running OSX baremetal with windows or linux easily.

Currently, I can run OSX in vmware on windows and put it fullscreen on one of my monitors and it runs pretty good.
Performance is fine and functionality is good.

But, if I can get it running on the bare metal I think I would use it more.
Everywhere I look people say that there are tricks required in installing OSX on Xen.
Do you know if there are, or what they are, and is there anything new with Lion.

Can you boot a VMDK or other virtual machine drive in XEN? coz iv got those created already and that would be a simple solution.

Also, is there any reason NOT to use Citrix's Xen, compared with the open source project? Is it bad in anyway other than the generic "citrix gayness"?

:)

#28
OnePlane

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Hey OnePlane,
Awesome stuff, iv been following this thread since the start of the year hoping someone would come up with a good straight forward guide or solution, to running OSX baremetal with windows or linux easily.

Currently, I can run OSX in vmware on windows and put it fullscreen on one of my monitors and it runs pretty good.
Performance is fine and functionality is good.

But, if I can get it running on the bare metal I think I would use it more.
Everywhere I look people say that there are tricks required in installing OSX on Xen.
Do you know if there are, or what they are, and is there anything new with Lion.

Can you boot a VMDK or other virtual machine drive in XEN? coz iv got those created already and that would be a simple solution.

Also, is there any reason NOT to use Citrix's Xen, compared with the open source project? Is it bad in anyway other than the generic "citrix gayness"?

:)


Well, I use the Open Source Xen, mostly due to Citrix's gayness ;) And that works fine. Problem with most people/implementations/users is that it takes a bit of time to learn how to configure things properly. In the world of computing, everything is possible, the only limiting factor is people. If you can't or won't configure/setup things yourself, it's not possible to do the three-fold bare-metal setup. There are a few GUIs but mostly it's all about commandline and text configuration files.

VMDK is for VMware only. No go there, sorry about that. For Xen, you actually use real virtualisation; you have a physical disk, and you can 'give' it to the Guest OS, and that gives you 100% hardware access to that disk. Or you can use it as a logical disk with LVM, and split it in a few pieces. The Guest OS will think it's a real disk (but it will show up as a Xen SCSI disk), and it will work like a real disk. If the Guest OS is shut-down, you can actually just mount the disk, and all the files etc are there.

Mac OS X installation on Xen still requires the OSx86 way, so if you don't want to do that, stop right there ;)

#29
Lancerlot

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Well, I use the Open Source Xen, mostly due to Citrix's gayness ;) And that works fine. Problem with most people/implementations/users is that it takes a bit of time to learn how to configure things properly. In the world of computing, everything is possible, the only limiting factor is people. If you can't or won't configure/setup things yourself, it's not possible to do the three-fold bare-metal setup. There are a few GUIs but mostly it's all about commandline and text configuration files.

VMDK is for VMware only. No go there, sorry about that. For Xen, you actually use real virtualisation; you have a physical disk, and you can 'give' it to the Guest OS, and that gives you 100% hardware access to that disk. Or you can use it as a logical disk with LVM, and split it in a few pieces. The Guest OS will think it's a real disk (but it will show up as a Xen SCSI disk), and it will work like a real disk. If the Guest OS is shut-down, you can actually just mount the disk, and all the files etc are there.

Mac OS X installation on Xen still requires the OSx86 way, so if you don't want to do that, stop right there ;)


I really like the sound of this and have been looking into Xen quite a lot lately. Can you recommend any documentation or suggestions on what to use and how to set this up?

Thank you!

EDIT: So I found some good documentation on how to install Xen with Ubuntu Precise Pangolin: http://wiki.xen.org/.../XAPI_on_Ubuntu
Seems fairly straight forward though I was hoping to find something that was a bit nicer looking a la XenClient or NxTop.
I'll be playing around with this in the meantime. Cheers!

#30
crashnburn_in

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I know this thread is old but I have rarely found very many people discussing how amazing it is to have a BareMetal Light Virtualization Platform on which we can run VMs of different OSes.

I have just installed XenClient (I think 4.x or so) and I like the concept. I'll see how the implementation suits/ works for thing things I am trying to do.





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