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    • Allan

      Forum Rules   04/13/2018

      Hello folks! As some things are being fixed, we'll keep you updated. Per hour the Forum Rules don't have a dedicated "Tab", so here is the place that we have our Rules back. New Users Lounge > [READ] - InsanelyMac Forum Rules - The InsanelyMac Staff Team. 

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(i) If we lock old topics, users will create new topics, or worse, pollute unrelated topics. Personally I prefer the resurrection of old topics, that way the relevant information stays in one place.

 

(ii) We have dedicated Tiger and Leopard installation and post-installation forums.

 

I need to state a few things (my personal opinion/experience - not "official" InsanelyMac policy):

 

History will show that re-labeling forums and moving or locking old posts will not prevent lazy, uninformed or mentally challenged users from posting in the wrong place.

 

Even valid, up-to-date, known good (etc, etc) information can be used the wrong way, under any circumstances.

 

I don't think it's too much to expect that our users pay attention to the date and year of the topic they're reading - If someone should happen to kill their Mavericks installation by applying a solution that they found in a topic from 2008 then they were asking to learn the hard way.

 

When you are new to this community and have no idea where to begin, all of the information contained here, old and new, is confusing, potentially misleading even. As a newcomer you will still have to learn, all by yourself, how to separate what you can use from what you can't use. The only way to do that is to read, and that means you'll most likely be reading something (old or new) that may or may not apply to your situation, or may or may not be the best way to solve a particular problem. When you first come here, there is no way you can know that. Until you read some more, and then some more. That is a fact that no amount of archiving or rearranging can change.

 

I don't see that there is a way to ease the pain of those who don't like to read, after all we are dealing with a text-based medium here.

 

Think about this; if you take a step back and look at the requirements for installing and running OS X on a PC, they haven't changed much, if at all, since the early days. Most of our means to install OS X have improved over the years, but basic information found in topics from 2008 about property injection (still waiting for root device, ethernetbuiltin=y, gfxutil, DSDT, legacy kexts, IOKit, smbios), decryption (Appledecrypt, DSMOS, Fakesmc) and power management (...) is still true and therefore potentially useful to someone trying to see the big picture. Just read this blog post from 2008 by David F. Elliott to see what I mean, that information is the foundation for what we are doing, and it's still valid, five years later.

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(i) If we lock old topics, users will create new topics, or worse, pollute unrelated topics. Personally I prefer the resurrection of old topics, that way the relevant information stays in one place.

 

(ii) We have dedicated Tiger and Leopard installation and post-installation forums.

 

I need to state a few things (my personal opinion/experience - not "official" InsanelyMac policy):

 

History will show that re-labeling forums and moving or locking old posts will not prevent lazy, uninformed or mentally challenged users from posting in the wrong place.

 

Even valid, up-to-date, known good (etc, etc) information can be used the wrong way, under any circumstances.

 

I don't think it's too much to expect that our users pay attention to the date and year of the topic they're reading - If someone should happen to kill their Mavericks installation by applying a solution that they found in a topic from 2008 then they were asking to learn the hard way.

 

When you are new to this community and have no idea where to begin, all of the information contained here, old and new, is confusing, potentially misleading even. As a newcomer you will still have to learn, all by yourself, how to separate what you can use from what you can't use. The only way to do that is to read, and that means you'll most likely be reading something (old or new) that may or may not apply to your situation, or may or may not be the best way to solve a particular problem. When you first come here, there is no way you can know that. Until you read some more, and then some more. That is a fact that no amount of archiving or rearranging can change.

 

I don't see that there is a way to ease the pain of those who don't like to read, after all we are dealing with a text-based medium here.

 

Think about this; if you take a step back and look at the requirements for installing and running OS X on a PC, they haven't changed much, if at all, since the early days. Most of our means to install OS X have improved over the years, but basic information found in topics from 2008 about property injection (still waiting for root device, ethernetbuiltin=y, gfxutil, DSDT, legacy kexts, IOKit, smbios), decryption (Appledecrypt, DSMOS, Fakesmc) and power management (...) is still true and therefore potentially useful to someone trying to see the big picture. Just read this blog post from 2008 by David F. Elliott to see what I mean, that information is the foundation for what we are doing, and it's still valid, five years later.

 

Unsurprisingly, David Elliott has worked for Apple Inc. since January 2010..........and I agree that careful reading and re-reading of the relevant IM topics is required for anyone to understand the basis for the OSx86 adventure, and so ultimately understand what they need to do to get OS X running on their PC hardware, whether that is easy or difficult but doable....

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Dedicated section/subsection on power management (cpu, gpu). Since I started hackintoshing (at the time of 10.6.3) I have been unable to get consistent and complete info on how to get this to work, only scattered bits and pieces, and those mostly on outdated OS X versions

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To encourage users to include their hardware profiles in their signatures and also better forum etiquette:

 

1. Make it compulsory for a user to enter the hardware details of their primary computer into their signature in order to post outside of the new users lounge eg include

  • Motherboard or OEM Manufacturer make & model
  • CPU make & model
  • Video Card make & model
  • RAM
  • Hard Drive
If a user has no idea of these basic details (at least the first three), they probably won't have a chance at installing OSX......

 

2. Include more questions in the new users' quizzes about forum rules and etiquette (I did the quizzes a while back so maybe some of these are now included?) eg I think the following posts provide excellent guidelines:

 

Guidelines For Posting In The New Users Lounge

New rule: limits to PMs

VERY IMPORTANT: PLEASE READ! (ABOUT TONYMACX86)

Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86

 

Too many users still mention the XXXX.beasts and also ignore basic forum etiquette eg not thanking another member for their help or if the suggestion provided did not work, provide feedback about what they did and how it did not work? There is nothing more frustrating than trying to help a user who is too lazy to do basic research for themselves first and who constantly says "it doesn't work" without providing any details about what they did &/or what hardware they were using.....

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After the downtime today (~6hrs?), the new topics no longer appear at the side of the main page (insanelymac.com/forum). Is this cause of an update? I liked having that there :)

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Hello

 

I prefer new topics apprearing in forum... without it the forum get a clean desing, but also is hard to know who has the newest topic.

 

I belive that it's a update, anyway iPoco said that news things will happen in forum in this summer... Is waite and see :)

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I have a suggestion regarding the main layout of the page. Considering Yosemite's release and the simplistic design that followed, and our dedication to the OS, I think a minor redesign of the site is in place.

 

Things that would need to be changed:

1. Strong colors

2. Ugly fonts (though posts should have readable default fonts)

3. Gradients and images where they are not necessary

 

A mockup: post-1199515-0-07798200-1413758773_thumb.png

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Been Lurking a long time, finally signed up to download diskutil 10.10.5. Answering the quiz, one question was about what partition type you need to install Mac OS X. That question is sadly outdated in the world of EFI and Clover. I'd suggest removing it.

 

Thanks... great site!

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I have a suggestion regarding the main layout of the page. Considering Yosemite's release and the simplistic design that followed, and our dedication to the OS, I think a minor redesign of the site is in place.

 

Things that would need to be changed:

1. Strong colors

2. Ugly fonts (though posts should have readable default fonts)

3. Gradients and images where they are not necessary

 

A mockup: attachicon.gifScreen Shot 2014-10-20 at 0.38.58.png

 

If you are a FF user, you can use my tiny hack here

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Hi folks;

 

Can we please consider moving to using (exclusive) HTTPS?? It's been years now since Let's Encrypt has been available and it's time to start using it (free).
Consider that everybody's passwords are traveling through the net in clear text when you're using this site..

 

-- Sinetek

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I would also like to suggest to move the site and database to Docker containers and use Kubernetes to scale with auto load balancing. If you would like help doing this I am more than welcome to help. Already have a Lets Encrypt container that is scheduled to spin up and re-cert every 90 days and send a signal to other containers to restart when the new cert gets renewed.

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