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Clover for Windows NVMe

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When I bought my HP Envy 17t-ae100, I also bought several upgrades including a 512 GB NVMe M.2 drive.  The NVMe drive, however, turned out to be a disappointment due to heat problems caused by the lack of space inside the ultra-thin HP laptop.  Even with a heatsink, the drive ran well into the 70's Celsius, which felt uncomfortably warm on my leg (yes, I actually use a laptop on my lap.). Before the heat of summer set in, I decided to swap out the NVMe drive and replace it with a 1 TB M.2 SATA SSD.  I notice no performance decrease with the SATA SSD and its temperature has never exceeded the low 50's Celsius and is usually in the high 30's.  But what to do with my old NVMe drive?

 

I decided to put it into my Windows 10 desktop gaming computer, which has a Z87 chipset, Haswell i7 processor and other features appropriate for a gaming rig.  My system disk for that computer was an mSATA 256 GB which was connected to the computer via an adapter connected to a 1x pci-e slot.  The adapter had its own firmware that allowed it to be recognized in the BIOS.  I bought a 4x adapter for the NVMe drive and it was recognized in Windows but not in the BIOS.  As a result, I could only use it as a storage drive, not as a boot drive.  The Z87 chipset has no support for NVMe drives.  That support started with the Z97 chipset.  Enter Clover for Windows.

 

I found the tutorial below and used CVAD's Bootdisk Utility (BDU) to install Clover - first to a USB drive for testing purposes and subsequently, to the mSATA drive I am no longer using as my system drive.  I added the nvme efi driver and the grub ntfs driver. I then went into the BIOS, changed the boot order so that it would boot from the mSATA Clover partition, and set it up to boot via UEFI.  It works like a dream and my NVMe drive is super-fast on this rig and its temperature stays in the mid 30's Celsius because there is lots of space for it and several well-placed cooling fans.  This is just one more reason to be grateful to those who devote their time and energy to the development and testing of the Clover bootloader.  Thanks.

 

https://www.win-raid.com/t2375f50-Guide-NVMe-boot-without-modding-your-UEFI-BIOS-Clover-EFI-bootloader-method.html

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Definitely kudos to all the Clover developers :thumbsup_anim:

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