Jump to content
  • ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • Similar Content

    • By ciriousjoker
      TLDR:
      I'm trying to boot MacOS on a Chromebook without UEFI. I'm stuck at getting the bootloader (Chameleon/Clover) to work.  
      My setup / context:
      I have an Acer Chromebook Spin 13.
      Available ports:
      2 x USB-C 1 x USB-A 3.0 MicroSD Slot No USB A 2.0 (I've read that Clover has problems with USB 3.0) Firmware:
      There's no UEFI firmware available and by default, it doesn't even allow booting anything other than ChromeOS. Thanks to MrChromebox (big shoutouts!), I flashed a custom legacy bios that allows me to boot anything linux related. This bios is flashed into the RW_LEGACY section of the existing bootloader (coreboot afaik) and doesn't have any configuration options. If I have to change a setting, I could try compiling his bios payload myself with the specific setting enabled.  
      What I've tried so far:
      Chameleon attempts:
      Only selected setting was "Install chameleon on the chosen path", rest was unselected.
       
      1 - Install chameleon first without restoring the basesystem:
      Output:
      > boot0: GPT
      > boot0: done
      (hangs; pressing power button once shuts down
      Chameleon installation log is attached as "Chameleon_Installer_Log_BEFORE".
       
      2 - Install Chameleon after restoring the base system:
      Output:
      > boot0: GPT
      > boot0: GPT
      > boot0: doneboot1: /boot       <- Exactly like that, no line break in between
      (hangs; pressing power button once shuts down)
       
      I haven't been able to reproduce #2 after wiping the drive and doing the same thing again. Subsequent attempts have resulted in either #1 of either Chameleon or Clover.
      Chameleon installation log is attached as "Chameleon_Installer_Log_AFTER".
       
      Clover attempts:
      I tried multiple settings and configurations, but all of them boiled down to either one of these.
       
      1 - Doesn't do anything, just hangs at "Booting from usb..."
      2 - Boots into the blue/grey mode as shown in the attached images.
      According to MrChromebox, this could be an old Tianocore DUET It doesn't detect anything (cpu frequency, ram, partitions or disks)  
      I've read pretty much every article, github readme and other types of documentation for coreboot, tianocore, clover, chameleon and MrChromebox' rw_legacy payloads and right now, I'm totally clueless as to what to try next...
       
      A few questions that came up:
      Why does chameleon hang? What is it looking for, /boot was clearly written to the disk by the Chameleon installer? What exactly is the blue/grey image? According to MrChromebox, it could be Tianocore DUET Where does it come from? Clover? The mainboard itself? Why does the blue/grey thing not detect my processor frequency or any partitions/drives? Can I use some sort of DUET bootloader to chainload Clover?  
      If you guys could answer any of them or if you have any other guesses or information as to what's happening, I'd be really happy!
      Chameleon_Installer_Log_BEFORE.txt
      Chameleon_Installer_Log_AFTER.txt





    • By glasgood
      CLOVER DUAL BOOT MOJAVE & WINDOWS 10 GUIDE 
       

       
       
      INCLUDES  MBR / LEGACY BIOS  TO  GPT / EFI CONVERSION
      USING MBR2GPT TOOL
       
       
      PREREQUISITE: Two physical discs ( SSD’s or HDD’s )
       
       
       
       
       
      STEP 1 - Clover dual boot configuration 
       
      Open config.plist with Clover Configurator
       
      Boot
       Legacy = PBR Timeout = True ( will remove the Timeout countdown, from Clover boot menu)  

       
      GUI 
      Scan / Custom
       Entries = True  Tool = True  Legacy = False ( removes extra Windows 10 entries )  
      Hide Volume
      - Preboot ( macOS Preboot )
      - Recovery ( macOS Recovery )
       

       
      So at boot you will have two options: boot macOS Mojave or Windows 10 
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      ————————————————————
       
       
      STEP 2 - Using a drive without Windows 10 installed
       
      Disconnect system drive that contains your macOS Mojave install from computer ( This is so that Windows does not overwrite existing macOS Mojave boot loader )
       
      Proceed with a Windows 10 UEFI install.  
      After installation reconnect macOS Mojave Drive, the Windows installation should now be detected and usable in Clover. 
      If Windows 10 is not detected or able to boot,  then verify you installed Windows 10 as UEFI and not MBR ---->  ( Read step 2 - For a drive with Windows 10 installed )
       
       
      OR
       
       
       
      STEP 2 - Using a drive with Windows 10 already installed
       
      Verify your Windows install is  GPT / UEFI or MBR / Legacy BIOS.   
      If Windows install is GPT UEFI then Windows 10 install is ready to use at Clover boot menu, you should be able to boot into Windows directly from Clover boot screen. 
       

       
       
      But if  Windows drive is detected at Clover boot screen, but when booting Windows you get a black screen with a cursor on the top left,
      then this is most likely because Windows drive is MBR ( Legacy BIOS ).  You can easily convert MBR to GPT using  Windows MBR2GPT tool ( this saves hours work having to reinstall Windows 10 and setting up all your applications again  ) 
       
      If Windows 10 install is MBR / Legacy BIOS  then simply convert to GPT / UEFI  following instructions below ( read video summary and view video )
       
       
      ** To use Windows 10  MBR2GPT tool  you must have Windows 10 version 1703 ( creators update  ) or later and less than 3 partitions on 
      the Windows 10 drive **
       
      Video summary:
       
      Confirm Windows 10 drive is MBR Legacy BIOS ( in Windows Disk Management ) Reboot into Windows PE ( Advanced Startup ) Convert from MBR Legacy BIOS to GPT UEFI ( using commands below ) mbr2gpt /validate mbr2gpt /convert Restart Verify Windows 10 drive has changed to GPT UEFI ( in Windows Disk Management )  
       
       
       
      After conversion Windows 10 is ready to use at the Clover boot menu 
       
       
    • By Slice
      Since rev 4844 Vector Themes are supported and there are ready-to-use Clovy by Clovy, cesium by Slice and BGM_SVG by Blackosx.
      You may see it's structure to create own theme
      -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       
       
      Now I want to add vector graphics support in Clover. See rev 4560 and later.
      It is not working yet but designers may begin to create Vector Themes.
      It supposed to consist of SVG elements and has design size. It will be rendered to any screen size scaled from design size.
       
      What application in macOS can create SVG graphics?
      Inkscape is not working in macOS 10.11+. Pity.
      LibreOffice Draw works with SVG but buggy.
      Boxy SVG cost 10$ but looks good enough. It creates the best in simplicity files and have more then enough features.
      Illustrator is good but expensive.
       
      How to improve SVG file?
      Clover has restricted support for SVG. It is your job to make compatible file and as small as possible to speedup rendering.
      Some helps:
      Help:Inkscape – From invalid to valid SVG Inkscape files
      From invalid to valid SVG Adobe Illustrator files
      From invalid to valid SVG files of other editors: BKchem, ChemDraw and CorelDRAW
      Help:Illustrator – Assistance with creating and saving SVG images in Adobe Illustrator that will pass W3C validation
      User:Quibik/Cleaning up SVG files manually
      Later I will write own instructions specific to Clover abilities.
       
      How to create SVG fonts?
      You can google to find ready-to-use SVG fonts.  I found some problems with too beaty fonts: slow rendering and overflow crash. Be careful.
      You can get ttf or otf fonts and convert them into svg by using online WEB services. Not a problem to google.
      But then I want to find a way to simplify the font to reduce a size and speedup rendering.
      You can create own font by FontForge It is opensource and available for Windows, Mac and GNU+Linux. It creates otf font which you can convert to svg font.
       
      Pictures from Badruzeus
      https://www.insanelymac.com/forum/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=301597
    • By ludufre
      [GUIA] Correção de assinatura BIOS Insyde H2O
       
      Recentemente comprei um notebook Lenovo L440 pra instalar o macOS Mojave e fui substituir a placa wireless pela DW1560 porque a atual não é compatível. Descobri que existia uma whitelist de placas permitidas que as fabricantes estão adotando recentemente (no meu caso utiliza uma bios Phoenix Insyde BIOS H2O).
       
      Procurei em fórums de BIOS MODDING e encontrei pessoas que fizeram o patch pra mim. Só que após substituir a BIOS notei que o computador ficava apitando 5 vezes todas vez que ligava e fui me aprofundar no caso. E foi aí que descobri como resolver isso e por isso criei esse guia baseado nas informações que achei em alguns fóruns russos.
       
       
      Prefácio
       
      Quando a BIOS falha no teste te integridade, algumas funcionalidades Intel AMT param de funcionar e é emitido uma sequência de 5 apitos duas vezes no boot.
      Após modificar para remover whitelist (habilitar placas WI-FI não autorizadas), destravar MSR 0xe2 (hackintosh), habilitar menu avançado, etc. a BIOS não vai passar no teste de integridade causando esse problema.
      Essa verificação de integridade é feita através da assinatura RSA do bloco da BIOS chamado TCPABIOS (mais informações abaixo) com a chave pública no formato modulus 3 também armazenada na BIOS.
      Esse bloco TCPABIOS armazena os checksums de cada volume da BIOS.
       
      O que faremos é gerar novos checkums para esses volumes que foram modificados, gerar um para de chaves RSA (privada e pública), assinar esse bloco com a chave privada e substituir a chave pública.
       
       
      Ferramentas necessárias
       
      - EFITool NE alpha 54: https://github.com/LongSoft/UEFITool/releases
      - HxD 2.1.0: https://mh-nexus.de/en/hxd/
      - OpenSSL: http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/packages/openssl.htm (Download -> Binaries)
      - Microsoft File Checksum Integrity Verifier (FCIV.exe): https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=11533
       
      Passo a passo
       
      Vamos abrir a BIOS modificada, localizar o bloco TCPABIOS e entender sua anatomia.
       
      1. Abra a BIOS no HxD
       

      (Vamos utilizar nesse guia a BIOS modificada no fórum MyDigitalLife.com pelo usuário Serg008 para o notebook Lenovo B590)
       
      2. Busque a palavra TCPABIOS:
       


       
      3. O bloco começa com TCPABIOS e termina com antes de TCPACPUH
       

       
      4. Anatomia:
       
      54 43 50 41 42 49 4F 53 48 31 38 34 61 31 31 2F
      32 36 2F 31 33 49 42 4D 53 45 43 55 52 00 FD 27
      34 2A 35 AB 41 26 39 E3 32 E5 B6 8A D6 49 5B 0B
      77 F9 82 58 48 00 00 00 CE 18 1F 00 00 00 03 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 27 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
      00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF FF 83 04 D4
      52 52 95 C5 D7 21 55 78 0E 5C AD 47 EE C4 3D 1D
      C1 EC 69 03 2B 51 A5 42 61 96 22 F9 7B 88 57 B7
      A8 9D D0 20 DB 5B 11 10 55 07 84 6C 62 DF FA 2F
      6A A8 43 0C 8A 40 AF 79 0D 31 DB 5A 5D C8 2F EB
      F8 7C 87 B0 A6 3D 2A 88 AE 91 9D 88 E3 AA 85 E3
      5A B3 91 7F 28 68 1F BA 92 C4 7E 10 F5 1A 7E 75
      A9 6F CE C0 4F BA FA 79 A5 98 2B 50 60 BA 09 73
      7B 03 D1 0C 3E A2 9C 44 DF E9 F2 92 34 7B
       
      Cinza: Nome e informações do bloco
      Vermelho: Informações dos volumes (Checksum e Cabeçalho)
      Azul: Separação da lista de volumes para a assinatura do bloco
      Verde: Assinatura do bloco TCPABIOS são os últimos 128 bytes
       
      Lista de Volumes:
       
      Cada volume tem o formato: 00 FD 27 34 2A 35 AB 41 26 39 E3 32 E5 B6 8A D6 49 5B 0B 77 F9 82 58 48 00 00 00 CE 18 1F 00 00 00 03 00 00 00 00 00
                                                      (prefixo 3 bytes + checksum 20 bytes + offset 4 bytes + tamanho do volume 6 bytes + separador do fim 6 bytes)
       
      Os volumes são enumerados e utilizam o primeiro byte no prefixo para isso (00 FD 27), começando do 0.
      A BIOS utilizada nesse exemplo possui somente um volume, mas no caso de mais de um volume, seria: 00 FD 27 .., 01 FD 27 ..., 02 FD 27 ...
      - Checksum é o cálculo SHA1 do volume.
      - Offset é a posição do volume dentro da BIOS. Os bytes ficam invertidos, nesse caso seria 00 00 00 48 ou seja: 48h
      - Tamanho do volume também está com os bytes invertidos, então: 1F18CEh
       
      Então é isso. Precisamos corrigir essas informações (checksum, offset e tamanho)
       
      5. Para extrair os volumes abra a BIOS com o UEFITool e veja como identificar os volumes (nosso exemplo há somente um volume, se houvessem outros estariam também dentro de EfiFirmwareFileSystemGuid):
       

       
      Na BIOS original, circulado em vermelho podemos ver o nosso volume.
      Observe que em azul temos Offset e verde o tamanho. Exatamente como verificamos acima no HxD. Já na BIOS modificada vemos que está diferente o tamanho:
      Oridinal: 1F18CEh
      Modificada: 1F12D5h (vamos precisar disso mais tarde)
       
      6. Vamos extrair esse volume escolhendo a opção “Extract as is...”
       
       
       
      7. Utilize esse comando para obter o checkum desse volume: fciv.exe -sha1 File_Volume_image_FvMainCompact.ffs
       

       
      Agora temos o checksum que é 396e0dc987219b4369b1b9e010166302ce635202
       
      8. Substitua as informações no bloco TCPABIOS:
       

       
      Observe que o tamanho do volume precisa ter os bytes invertidos, então se o total são 6 bytes e é 1F12D5h, fica D5 12 1F 00 00 00 no lugar de CE 18 1F 00 00 00.
      Se o offset for diferente, também realizar o mesmo procedimento invertendo os bytes.
      Checksum alterar de 34 2A 35 AB 41 26 39 E3 32 E5 B6 8A D6 49 5B 0B 77 F9 82 58 para 39 6E 0D C9 87 21 9B 43 69 B1 B9 E0 10 16 63 02 CE 63 52 02
       
      Faça esse procedimento para cada volume na BIOS.
       
      9. Agora precisamos gerar o checksum de todo o bloco TCPABIOS mas sem considerar os últimos 131 bytes, ou seja desconsiderar de FF FF 83 + 80 bytes da assinatura anterior.
       
      Copie para um novo arquivo no HxD e salve como tcpabios
       

       
      Utilize o comando para gerar o checksum desse bloco: fciv.exe -sha1 tcpabios
       

       
      Checksum do bloco TCPABIOS: 0da6715509839a376b0a52e81fdf9683a8e70e52
       
      Crie um novo arquivo no HxD e adicione 108 bytes com 00 e cole o checksum no final e salve como tcpabios_sha, ficando assim:
       

       
      10. Agora vamos gerar a chave privada RSA com modulus 3: openssl genrsa -3 -out my_key.pem 1024
       

       
      Assinar o arquivo tcpabios_sha: openssl rsautl -inkey my_key.pem -sign -in tcpabios_hash -raw > tcpabios_sign
       

       
      Agora aproveite para gerar a chave publica: openssl rsa -in my_key.pem -outform der -pubout -out my_key_pub.der
       

       
      E gerar modulus 3 da chave pública: openssl rsa -pubin -inform der -in my_key_pub.der -text -noout
       

       
      Copie e cole a chave em um arquivo de texto para utilizar daqui a pouco. Remova todos os “:” e coloque tudo em uma única linha, ficando assim:
       

       
      11.   Abra o arquivo tcpabios_sign no HxD, copie o conteúdo e substitua a assinatura no final do bloco TCPABIOS:
       
       
       
      12. Agora vamos localizar na BIOS o local da chave pública e substituir. Essa chave começa com 12 04 e termina com 01 03 FF e fica após o bloco TCPABBLK.
       
      A chave fica assim: 12 04 + 81 bytes + 01 03 FF. Faça uma busca por 01 03 FF para localizar mais facilmente. Verifique se antes dos 81 bytes tem os bytes 12 04 para ter certeza que achou.
       

       

       
      Agora substitua pela chave pública que ficou anotado no arquivo de texto anteriormente, ficando assim:
       

       
       
      Salve e está pronto. Sua BIOS está assinada e pronta.
       
×