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[Vendo] [VI + Sped] Case Mac Pro

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Vendo case di un Mac Pro.

Il case è in buone condizioni generali (qualche graffio qua e la, a volte esaltato dal flash nelle foto), l'unica pecca è che il piedistallo posteriore è leggermente schiacciato (a destra guardando da dietro) e nella parte posteriore il case si è leggermente aperto, questa foto dovrebbe farvi capire le condizioni ---> https://picasaweb.go...feat=directlink

 

Il case viene venduto con tutti e solo i componenti che vedete in foto: manca la scheda frontale, per usb, audio e firewire, ma è presente il pulsante di accensione con il suo connettore.

 

VENDUTO

 

Priorità a chi ritira a mano.

 

Tutte le foto

 

Francesco.

 

post-297854-0-96344200-1326917212_thumb.jpg

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      Download attachment: cable-management.png Download attachment: caselayout.png Download attachment: DSC00046.JPG
       
       
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