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Moving applications off the boot partition


JustInSane
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Since I'm running Jaguar on a B&W G3, it's paramount that I get applications off the boot partition, because the boot partition is limited to 8G with this configuration.

 

I always install apps on a seperate application partition whenever possible. However, some apps force me to install on the crowded boot partition. I've managed to remedy this problem for some apps by using mv to move them to another partition after the installation, then using ln to create a symbolic link to the new location. Functionally this should simply work. But it only works sometimes.

 

The problem is that some apps break in this process. For example, if I move the Nikon Picture Project tool and create a symbolic link so the original paths could still be referenced, Picture Project will not execute. Instead, the icon changes to the Textedit icon, and Textedit opens a blank file named "Picture Project". I had the exact same problem with Palm Desktop. Yet I was able to move ThinkFree Office without issue.

 

How can I fix this?

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If an application has an old fashioned resource fork, the mv command will not copy it. Instead, try the ditto command.

 

Almost no application needs to be in the Application folder. It has only been recently that Apple added the capability to the Installer to allow developers the option of placing applications any place else. The symlink just isn't necessary.

 

However, any Apple app is expected to be in the Applications folder if Software Update tries to update it.

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Thanks Rammjet; that's exactly what I needed to know.

 

Out of curiousity, would tar preserve the same information that ditto preserves? I recall situations in Solaris or linux where tar would preserve information that cp would not, so folks would type "tar cvf - <files> | tar xvf --directory <destination> -" instead of "cp -r source dest".

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If an application has an old fashioned resource fork,

Are resource forks the same as alternate data streams ("ADS")? I vaguely remember HFS filesystems having different terminology for ADS.

 

It's a shame these things are becoming obsolete. I always felt that filesystems do not do enough to provide a mechanism for metadata. Too bad most applications don't make use of them.

 

The fact that Nikon Picture Project ("NPP") loses integrity with the mv command, but not with the ditto command, does that necessarily mean that NPP has resource forks? Does OS/X have a built in command to detect resource forks?

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  • 2 weeks later...
If an application has an old fashioned resource fork, the mv command will not copy it. Instead, try the ditto command.

 

Almost no application needs to be in the Application folder. It has only been recently that Apple added the capability to the Installer to allow developers the option of placing applications any place else. The symlink just isn't necessary.

 

However, any Apple app is expected to be in the Applications folder if Software Update tries to update it.

 

Does that meen that all Apple Apps must stay on the Boot Partition

 

or is there some other way around this?

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Does that meen that all Apple Apps must stay on the Boot Partition

 

or is there some other way around this?

The Apple apps usually can be moved and they will run fine. But if an update for them comes over Software Update, it won't update them unless they are in the Applications folder.

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The Apple apps usually can be moved and they will run fine. But if an update for them comes over Software Update, it won't update them unless they are in the Applications folder.

A soft link should make the updates possible, using 'ln -s'.

 

Though I have discovered that some apps will not execute through a soft link (while some do), and a mac alias must be used in those cases. I'm not sure if a mac alias is adequite for the update tool.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I began working on another machine, and moved all apps from "/Applications/" to "/Volumes/Drive/Applications".

 

The problem is that Finder has an Applications icon that takes me straight to "/Applications/", not "/Volumes/Drive/Applications". Since I moved all applications, I do not want to create a soft link or mac alias for every single app. What I want to do is:

  1. rm -rf /Applications
  2. cd /
  3. ln -s /Volumes/Drive/Applications

My fear is that Finder has this special shortcut for Applications, and I don't want to mess up that icon. I want this change to be transparent to the user. Suggestions?

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