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A Nonny Moose

Most Frequent WRONG comments

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So, what you're saying is that it's more reasonable to pay the same amount of (or more) money for a system that's being phased out?

 

I've already stated that if you're getting a good deal on a G5, it would make sense. It doesnt, however, make sense to pay $3200 for a Quad G5 2.7 when you can pay less for a machine that's roughly equivalent and part of the new line.

 

First off, there is no such thing as a quad 2.7. The only G5 quad is a quad 2.5 GHz machine. Also, the best Powermac price I can find right now for a dual 2.5 machine (which is nothing to sneeze at) is $1988.00, far lower than the new price of $3200 for the quad (which is also the price of the high end Mac Pro, making it in line with "normal Apple pricing"). A savvy shopper (and not all shoppers are savvy) will be able to find a deal. The Apple Store itself offers a refurbished G5 Quad for $2699. Those G5's become further bargains when you realize that you don't need special RAM that has a heat sink on it (at a staggering price of $5700 to max out the RAM). It depends on how you look and how you look at the other costs (such as the RAM and trying to divine when the G5's will be phased out), and just looking at the initial sticker price is by no means a measure of performance either.

 

As for it being phased out, you say it like the G5's will be completely phased out of existence tomorrow, which isn't the case. Those G5 towers will last for several years and will be phased out like the G3 is getting now (and like the G3, it will take several years for it to be phased out).

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Careful on the personally directed attacks, guys. :poster_oops:

ad hominem ftw

debate classes and me dont go too well together.

 

 

 

Moose, i mostly agree with you. id definitely buy a g5 quad, but if i could go with the mac pro instead then i would just because i know for sure the g5 quad will be obsolete in 3 or 4 years. the mac pro will still be a decently performing competitor in a few years.

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2. Apple stole Dashboard from Konfabulator

 

It was in fact, Konfab who stole it first from Apple. Waaaaay back in the Classic days (Classic being pre-OS X), Apple had widgets on their Macs. This somehow stopped (I'm unsure as to when/why) and then Konfabulator took up the idea of having widgets on the Mac. Apple then decided to bring back widgets with OS 10.4. So Apple stole from Konfab who originally stole from Apple.

 

Indeed Apple had it first, in 1984 with the release of the first Macintosh. They were called Desk Accessories, mini apps that operated on the destop. They dissappeared until later version of the lovely os. And the code used to build them is also different. Konfabulatot uses XML and JavaScript; Dashboard uses HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Objective C.

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iWeb is to Frontpage as MS Paint is to Photoshop. You really can't compare them. iWeb was designed for simpletons who never learned a line of code in their life, and they rely on templates. FrontPage blows it away. Try to design a professional webpage using iWeb. And to raise the stakes, it can't be a blog, some page about your family vacation, or a page showing your podcast on mineral water. I dare you. Try it...

 

Okay.

 

This is wrong because it's actually correct, but you wont need that software on a mac, because mac people dont play games like pc users do, and if they do, they stick with mac games like WoW and Starcraft...

 

Not only is that completely untrue, it's just plain stupid.

 

There's this thing called "boot camp", and it was essentially MADE so Mac users could play games.

 

I like to play the PC Sonic games-and... OMG WTF IM ON A MAC LOLOLOLZ

 

That's an absurd generalization, do I not want to play half-life 2? Does anyone who likes FPS games not want to play half-life 2?

 

Give me a break.

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Frontpage is an absurd code breaking sodtware. iWeb is much beter for doing home web editing, they are both target at the same market.

 

ilife is wondefull for the target maket, i smuch better than any app in windows and i say ANY app in windows targeted at the same market.

 

The only thing Windows do better is playing... but there are consoles also.....

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look guys... dont try to bust the truth into PC users heads.... normally they wont understand until they get a mac... i get into fights with my fellow nerds, heh... everyone in my school is a nerd, about this constantly - but they dont listen... so i decided to bring my MBP into school.... much to my parents discontent of bringing an expensive laptop from Queens to the Bronx..... and i did manage to win several people over.... telling people stuff wont do anything - forcing them into an apple store might http://forum.insanelymac.com/style_emotico...ult/whistle.gif

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On the whole G5 vs Xenon arguement...

Here's some benchmarks posted earlier...

http://www.macworld.com/2006/08/firstlooks...bench/index.php

It's obvious that the majority on this forum will back the intel - this is a forum about running Mac on x86 hardware, most of which is Intel.

Both machines are very fast, with the Mac Pro beating the G5 in most areas.

Really, it depends on what you want to do, and what your budget is. You can buy a refurb 2.0ghz Dual Core G5 for about £1200, that (in benchmarks) beat a £1500 Quad 2.0ghz at Rossetta apps like CS2. Also, the prices for FB-DIMM RAM are extortionate. So if you are on a budget and don't need a slight performance boost in native apps, or run heavy PPC apps the G5 is the way to go. But if you are willing to dig into your pockets for slightly better all round performance as well as Vista/XP capabillity, then a Mac Pro is what you need.

What surprised me was how a G4 manages to edge ahead of the Mac Pro on PPC native apps - so if your Pro apps haven't jumped the UB bandwagon, perhaps you should stick with your older (but still good) Intel hardware.

 

On the subject of gaming - Intel is the only way to go. Aspyr have just released a Star Wars game that only runs on Intel hardware. Rediculous, I know (lazy porting :star_smile: ) but I guess they are all going that way eventually.

 

Meanwhile, I'll stick to my Powerbook G4 - it's rubbish at gaming, can't handle HD video, and can't even run iMovie at full speed. Not bad for a 18 month old laptop!

I guess I might have to get myself a Macbook when I ship off to uni in a couple years time.

 

So it's wrong to say either machines are bad - they are both über computers, the Mac Pro is only just a bit more über in some areas...

 

Hope this can settle a few arguements

 

:)

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The InsanelyMac Mods are violating my free speech rights!!! or...

 

This new rule violates my free speech rights et cetera

 

Boy, not only is this wrong, but it's showing off some severe ignorance, and it's time to set things as straight as I can (and I'm not even a mod):

 

You DON'T have free speech here. You've never HAD free speech here. You never WILL have free speech here (barring any changes in the law, that is).

 

As a PRIVATELY OWNED forum, this forum and the administrators/moderators can actively censor anything it pleases within the limits of the law. They can also state what is appropriate and inappropriate for this forum and they can also modify their rulings at any time (again, within the limits of the law). Should they so desire, InsanelyMac can actually claim copyright (via changing the voluntary user agreement everyone signed onto when they registered) for each and every post you have ever done here.

 

The simple fact that we enjoy a massive amount of freedom here compared to many other forums is a testament to the community, not the mods or admins. We've done a great job in keeping this a very friendly place where fewer rules of conduct are needed. New rules and punishments typically come about due to the actions of the community (or typically, a few members ruin it for everyone) and definitely not because the mods and admins are attempting to violate your nonexistent free speech rights.

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Please sign this online petition to...

 

Online petitions have this nasty habit of NOT WORKING. First off, any online petition is under suspicion because a lot of times there is a high level of fraud in an online petition (this happens to a lesser extent in a paper petition). This is mainly due to the anonymous nature of the internet and the allowing of false aliases on these online petitions.

 

In other words, one person can sign an online petition ten thousand times. It looks like a whole lot of signatures, BUT...it's just one guy trying to get his agenda pushed through.

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I run a professional (insert idea here) and need a Hackintosh to...

 

STOP STOP STOP!!!!! While copyright infringement is something that tends to be overlooked in the computer world, making money off of copyright infringement is just a horrible idea.

 

I mean, how would YOU feel if someone made a profit off of YOUR stuff and didn't pay YOU for YOUR work? Wouldn't you feel cheated out of something? Don't you feel entitled to a share of those profits? So why do you feel that copyright infringement is OK when it comes to creating a Hack, but it's clearly not OK when it involves your stuff?

 

If you're going to make money off of something, PLEASE FOR THE LOVE OF GOD, do it the legit way.

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Dude, uh... cool it a l'il, eh?

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8. Macs are more expensive

 

I decided to put this up to the Mythbuster test and went to both Apple.com and Dell.com to configure some systems. So I went with the following two cheap systems:

 

1. Apple Mac mini 1.5 GHz CoreSolo prices at $599.

 

2. Dell Dimension B110, priced today (8/12/06) at $279.

 

The following changes were applied to the systems to make them as equal as possible. In all honesty, I expect the Dell to remain cheaper:

 

1. The Dell was upgraded to WinXP Pro at a price of $159 more. Apple markets OS X as pro, so I went with Pro on Dell also.

 

2. Changed RAM in Dell to 512 MB at a price of $50

 

3. Mac mini hard drive changed to 80 GB at a price of $50

 

4. While unable to remove the monitor and keyboard/mouse, I had to go to Macworld and obtain a price of $65 to remove both items.

 

5. Added speakers to the Dell system, at a cost of $20.

 

6. Added Microsoft Works to Dell and Appleworks to Mac mini. Both were $79.

 

7. Added antivirus software to Dell at a cost of $79. This isn't truly needed on a Mac...yet

 

8. Upgraded the Dell to the Deluxe Entertainment pack, as it more closely matches iLife. It was $49.

 

9. Added the Apple USB modem to the Mac mini. Cost was $49.

 

10. Added extended warranties of three years to both systems. This was $109 for the Dell and $149 to the Mac mini.

 

OK, at this point the score is: $759 for the Dell. $926 for the Mac mini. There's more to the problem, though, so let's continue. The sites I chose for purchases were strictly arbitrary, as I would not accept a freeware substitute (since it would make the playing field inherently unfair):

 

11. The Mac mini has Quicken. I went to Intuit and obtained a price of $30 for the cheapest version, so we add that to the Dell to make things even.

 

12. Comic Life has no Windows version. So we can either remove $30 (I rounded up) from the mini or add $30 to Dell for software of your choice. In this case, I decided to give people their choice of any $30 piece of software.

 

13. Big Bang Board Games presents a similar problem. Substitute a $25 piece of software for the Dell.

 

14. I needed a substitute for iDVD. The cheapest one I found at PCMall was $79.

 

15. I need to add wireless capabilities to the Dell to make things fair. I found a cheap one for $20 at PCMall. Unfortunately, Granny won't be able to install the wireless PCI card (because nobody shopping for el cheapo uses PCI cards). So a USB model is about $30 for Granny.

 

16. Bluetooth is needed on the Dell to make things fair again. This was another $20 spent at PCMall, and this one is for USB

 

So now our total is $933 ($943 if you went for the USB wireless) for the now comparably equipped Dell and $926 for the Mac mini. Truthfully, I thought the Dell (even with everything added) would wind up being maybe $50 cheaper than the mini. I really did, and I thought the myth would be confirmed.

 

The price comparison between the DELL and the mini isn't right. I get that you were trying to make the two computers as equal as possible, but the Dell gives you more of a choice to choose what you need. Most people use their computer to go online, listen to some music, or use MS Office—and XP pro isn’t needed to do that. How many people will ever use blue tooth, or maybe the buyer does not need a wireless card because Ethernet is available. Anti virus on windows can be found for free, and DVDs can be played back without buying a standalone playback program.

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Please point to someone saying that the Mac Pro is screamingly faster than the G5.

 

 

*ahem*

 

post-50937-1180510520_thumb.png

 

I think Apple's benchmarks are making the implication.

After-all 3.1x faster than any computer is pretty fast, and considering how fast the G5 was to start with....

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Lol. Funny how Apple's been the *only* one to make outrageous claims about the Mac Pro's capability. I swear, thier marketing team has begun hiring gods. I'm just waiting for them to claim they invented the internet.

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Does anyone who likes FPS games not want to play half-life 2?

 

I hate Half-life 2...I thought it was boring and dull game....o_o

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Believing that modifying OS X to run on 'non-Apple logo'd' hardware is necessarily illegal

 

In most reasonable countries, it is completely legal to reverse-engineer software, although only for the purpose of ensuring interoperability (this is certainly the case with British and EU law where it is specifically described in that manner.) The only requirement is that you hold a licence to use the software. As such, Apple's EULA would not stand up in court in most of the developed world (along with 99.9% of software EULAs, actually, although usually for different reasons.)

 

IANAL, meh.

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2. Apple stole Dashboard from KonfabulatorIt was in fact, Konfab who stole it first from Apple. Waaaaay back in the Classic days (Classic being pre-OS X), Apple had widgets on their Macs. This somehow stopped (I'm unsure as to when/why) and then Konfabulator took up the idea of having widgets on the Mac. Apple then decided to bring back widgets with OS 10.4. So Apple stole from Konfab who originally stole from Apple.
all this coppying {censored} is really pissing me off, i dont get why people get so pissed off when someone comes out with a piece of software the has the same function of another. just because someone has made an application doesnt mean that you cant make one as well.

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I'm worried about viruses, adware, and spyware for the Mac.

 

Since 2001 (the release of OS X), there have been five viruses (all proof-of-concept and all involving 1d10t errors to make them work), no adware, and no spyware. You are effectively safe from all of these on a Mac for now.

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Please sign this online petition to...

 

Online petitions have this nasty habit of NOT WORKING. First off, any online petition is under suspicion because a lot of times there is a high level of fraud in an online petition (this happens to a lesser extent in a paper petition). This is mainly due to the anonymous nature of the internet and the allowing of false aliases on these online petitions.

 

In other words, one person can sign an online petition ten thousand times. It looks like a whole lot of signatures, BUT...it's just one guy trying to get his agenda pushed through.

I guess you're wrong there. Back a couple of years ago, I created an online petition to "save Project D.A.R.E." (drug abuse education). They were going to remove the program from the Haverhill Public Schools due to lack of funding. The petition got nigh 200 signatures from my city and was presented to the Haverhill City Mayor, which helped maintain D.A.R.E. for four more years.

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Did the petition use actual names and addresses? If so, then it was a real petition, not one of these schlock online things where you put in an email address to change the name of feces to poop.

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It was a little bit of a mix. It was online from petitionspot I believe, but it had our real names and e-mail addresses. And it actually made a difference in the city.

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I'm surprised that it didn't include addresses. Most petition receivers want to have something to really identify the person (and email is not the way to identify someone). This is done to reduce fraud.

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