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Anachronaut

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  1. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from ovof in El Capitan: Realtek ALC AppleHDA Audio   
    Update: Rebuilt system and kexts caches on my startup disk with KCPM Utility Pro, restarted and now all is working, including the digital S/PDIF outputs! Hopefully it stays stable.
     
    Thanks Toleda!
     
    Note: I also tried to "Repair Permissions on Entire Disk" with this utility, but it never finished [3+ hours], so perhaps something changed in 10.11.1.
  2. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from gfmacis in [GUIDE] Use Clonezilla to back up your startup disk   
    If you are going to mess around with trying to create a working Hackintosh, you’re really going to want some form of backup so that you can revert to it when your changes or tweaks don’t work right. You could use Time Machine, Carbon Copy Cloner, SuperDuper! or any number of other GUI programs that run in Mac OS (and then to restore your whole disk you may need to reinstall your boot loader), but there is another alternative in Clonezilla that works very well.
      This is a tutorial to show how to use Clonezilla Live to make a basic disk clone for backup, or to restore your machine from a perviously created backup. Clonezilla is a very capable program with many options and uses. This tutorial is only intended to show its use in its most basic form for new users. If you want to explore other uses for Clonezilla, you will need to do research and exploration yourself, as for me, this is all I need.   Why use Clonezilla Live instead of another backup program?   1. Clonezilla Live is FREE and OPEN SOURCE.   2. Clonezilla Live is outside of your current operating system and can make a bootable clone of nearly any current boot disk from a current OS and boot loader. For more details, see the Clonezilla website: http://www.clonezilla.org   3. Clonezilla Live is fast. Well, relatively speaking I guess, at least for most disks. It only clones the used data portion of the disk, saving time. Connecting my computer to a refurbished Western Digital Caviar Blue 250GB drive in an old-and-really-cheap USB 2.0 case, a clone of my startup drive with about 60GB of data took about 21 minutes. Connecting to a 250 GB SSD in a modern USB3 SuperSpeed Case, the same clone took 4 minutes (running at near 20 GB/min speed).   4. Clonezilla Live creates a bare metal backup. What that means is that if everything goes sideways, you could buy new hardware matching your current specs, properly set up the BIOS, then use Clonezilla to restore the information and boot sectors to a new drive and you would be back in business. [i have not tried this with a new disk, but have reloaded my system several times form backup with perfect results.]   5. Unlike some commercial cloning programs that run within the Mac OS (or others), there is no need to reinstall the boot loader after the clone is made. The disk is ready to use right after being made.   What are the disadvantages to using Clonezilla Live?   1. Finding the correct version and creating a usable USB stick, CD, or DVD can be difficult and intimidating for those with a less technical background.   2. The user interface, while very usable, is a bit of an antique. It looks and acts like it belongs in ye olde computer museum. This further adds to the difficulty and intimidation factor for new and less technically skilled users.   3. Clonezilla cannot do incremental backups. It only does whole disk copies.   4. Clonezilla can be very picky about cloning to a drive the is not equal to or greater in size than the source disk – even down to the last sector block.   Hopefully this tutorial will help some of you get started with this very useful program.         The Setup   You need a disk for your backup. The Clonezilla instructions say “the destination partition must be equal or larger than the source one.” So technically, you want a disk equal in size to the one you are Cloning (or a partition of equal size, but this tutorial is ONLY about the BASICS, so we will just use the whole disk). Now, it is true that the program only copies the data portion of the disk, so it is possible that this will work with two different size disks, but this is not supported by the Clonezilla documentation (unless you use Expert Mode, but this tutorial is ONLY for BASICS, remember). Having said that, I used a 1 TB disk for backup and restored the clone to a 250 GB drive with no problems, but this may not always work.   For the purposes of this tutorial, I will stick to just a 250 GB internal SSD startup disk, and an external 250 GB hard disk backup for simplicity.   Download Clonezilla   As stated above, getting the correct version can be intimidating for new users. Almost all modern hardware that is being used for a Hackintosh will use the Ubuntu based version that can be downloaded from the link below. Be sure to download the ISO file. The download options should look like this before pressing the down load button (you want the version labeled amd64 even if you have an Intel processor).     Clonezilla Download   Take the ISO image out of your downloads folder and place it on the desktop before continuing to the next step.       Create a bootable USB flash drive from the ISO file   While you COULD use a CD or DVD for this purpose, why would you go for such old technology when a USB flash drive with work better and faster.   Before I start: I am using the brackets [ ] to denote something to be replaced in a command. You do not type the brackets, only the item described inside the brackets. If you still don’t understand any part, look at the completed example at the end of this section.   1. Insert your USB Flash Drive. Since the ISO file is only about 200 MB, you won’t need a very large drive. I don’t think it even matters what the current file system is on the drive for this because it will all be erased in this process (I have done this with both GUID and FAT32 systems).   2. Open Terminal (in the finder, use the Go menu and choose Utilities, there you will find Terminal.app)   3. Type
    diskutil list  to get a list of connected drives. Note the identifier for your drive (disk1 in my example)   4.  Unmount your USB drive with the following command.  diskutil unmountDisk /dev/[your disk identifier]   5. Copy the ISO image to your USB drive with the following command. Note that you should start typing until “if=“ and then drag the ISO image from the desktop to the insertion point to get its path before continuing to type the rest of the command. sudo dd if=[drag your ISO image from the desktop to here to get its path] of=/dev/r[your disk identifier] bs=1m When you press enter your will be prompted for your password. Enter it and press return. Be patient as it will take a bit of time with no indication that anything is happening other than the fact that the $ prompt has not reappeared yet.   dd is a direct sector disk copy utility if=  specifies the source disk or image of= specifies the destination disk or image /dev/ means device r before the disk identifier apparently speeds up the process bs=1m specifies the size of block to read at one time (if this is not working you can try bs=1M)   See sources How to Copy and ISO to a USB Drive from Mac OS X with dd and Disk Management From the Command-Line, Part 1 for more information.   When finished it will give a message about what was copied. Also, a warning should appear on your desktop indicating that the disk is not readable by your computer:     This is another indication that you followed the steps correctly – IMPORTANT! Click on the Ignore button to dismiss the warning.   5. IMPORTANT! After dismissing the warning, go back to the terminal. Enter the command 
    diskutil list again. You should see your USB drive with something like “FDisk_partition_scheme.”   6. Eject your USB drive by issuing the command 
    diskutil eject /dev/[your disk identifier]  You should get a message that the disk was ejected. Remove the USB drive at this time, and use something to write Clonezilla on its case so you know what it is.   Here is the text of the entire process on my computer for reference:
    Last login: Sun Oct 11 09:06:17 on console Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil list /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *250.1 GB disk0 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS El Capitan 249.2 GB disk0s2 /dev/disk1 (external, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *7.9 GB disk1 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk1s1 2: Apple_HFS Clonezilla 7.6 GB disk1s2 Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil unmountDisk /dev/disk1 Unmount of all volumes on disk1 was successful Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ sudo dd if=/Users/anachronaut/Desktop/clonezilla-live-20150805-vivid-amd64.iso of=/dev/rdisk1 bs=1m Password: 191+0 records in 191+0 records out 200278016 bytes transferred in 6.947753 secs (28826301 bytes/sec) Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil list /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *250.1 GB disk0 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS El Capitan 249.2 GB disk0s2 /dev/disk1 (external, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: FDisk_partition_scheme *7.9 GB disk1 1: 0xEF 7.5 MB disk1s2 Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil eject /dev/disk1 Disk /dev/disk1 ejected Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ The following seems like a lot of steps, but it all goes quite quickly once you get the idea.     Boot from your Clonezilla Live USB drive to clone your startup disk   1. Shut down your computer   2. Insert your Clonezilla Live USB drive into an active USB port. Clonezilla does seem to use USB3 speeds, so this may be a good option. (Although this is probably only relevant to your backup drive, not the USB stick).   3. Attach your backup disk to another USB port (USB3 if available) if your are using an external backup drive (highly recommended).   4. Power up your computer while holding down the key for choosing boot options. Since I am using an ASUS board this is f8, but this varies by manufacturer, so check your manual if you are not sure.   5. Choose to boot from your Clonezilla USB drive. It should be the one with the smaller capacity. Don’t worry if you have an older USB backup drive that does not show up at this point, we can get it to show later. You will see some text, and then Clonezilla will start. Here is what my boot options list looked like:     For all of the following Clonezilla screens, it is usually easiest to use the arrow keys and the enter key to select your options. Ignore the part in the onscreen Clonezilla instructions about using the space key. Most of the time, if you don't know, just stick with the default options.   6. Choose screen resolution   7. Choose language   8. Choose keymap   Some text will fly by here and then…   9. Choose Start Clonezilla   10. Choose device to device clone   11. Choose Beginner Mode   12. Choose disk_to_local_disk   13. Choose source disk.   Notice in the above image, that my 250 GB external disk does not show here. If the target disk doesn’t appear, as like the image here, choose cancel (use the mouse). Turn the external drive off, and then back on again (or disconnect and reconnect if no external power) and then follow the onscreen instructions to restart Clonezilla. It should appear in the list the next time.   14. Here is the source disk chooser after restarting Clonezilla and getting back to this point. Notice that both 250 GB disks now appear. I will choose the M.2 drive for the source, and the WD drive for the target from here.   15. Choose target disk. This will be erased so be sure you have the right one.   16. Choose to skip repair.   17. Press Enter to continue.   18. Enter y and then y again to confirm erasure of your disk. This is your last chance to back out if you did not choose the correct target disk, so double check you are correct.   19. Watch the progress, or go do something else for a while.   20. Press enter to continue again.  
    21. IMPORTANT! Choose to Poweroff. Once the computer has shut down, remove the Clonezilla USB drive and your external backup drive before starting your computer again.   You should now have a nearly identical, bootable clone to your startup disk. To restore a system, just reverse the choices with the Source and Target disks.  
    One final note: Despite appearances, Clonezilla is still in active development. When I first downloaded and used Clonezilla Live, the file name was clonezilla-live-20150805-vivid-amd64.iso, when writing this tutorial, I downloaded the latest version which is clonezilla-live-20151012-wily-amd64.iso. Notice that the date of issue is conveniently coded in the name, the latest version being issued on October 12, 2015.
  3. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  4. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  5. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from cmp in Nvidia Web Driver updates for El Capitan (UPDATE 07/11/2018)   
    Confirmed WebDriver 346.03.15b01 is working on my system after security update 2016-001 for 10.11.6 broke my NVIDIA web driver. For anyone who doesn't know, there is a download link for the installer for this on the first post in this thread. I have temporarily disabled the automatic update feature of my NVIDIA updater control panel until a new version of the web driver is available for this build.
     
     
  6. Like
    Anachronaut reacted to zeppfrog in OS X 10.12 codename Fuji - What we know about it....   
    The question to me has always been, "Why go to so much effort to lock out so much market". I KNOW Apple isn't really in the OS selling business, but, well, why not. It isn't like it is going to damage their current Machine market. Guys like me are never, ever going to fork out for a soon to be obsolete shiny box. And I have no love for the trash can pc. But, if i could toss out a few bucks for plug and play OS X, I'd do that. And it would open up the world for them in programmers. Coders will always go to the bigger market. and yes, there are apple lover coders too, I get that. That again reenforces my point. Open the OS to everyone with a PC and they won't lose Apple lovers. Probably gain more
     
  7. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  8. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  9. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from gfmacis in [GUIDE] Use Clonezilla to back up your startup disk   
    If you are going to mess around with trying to create a working Hackintosh, you’re really going to want some form of backup so that you can revert to it when your changes or tweaks don’t work right. You could use Time Machine, Carbon Copy Cloner, SuperDuper! or any number of other GUI programs that run in Mac OS (and then to restore your whole disk you may need to reinstall your boot loader), but there is another alternative in Clonezilla that works very well.
      This is a tutorial to show how to use Clonezilla Live to make a basic disk clone for backup, or to restore your machine from a perviously created backup. Clonezilla is a very capable program with many options and uses. This tutorial is only intended to show its use in its most basic form for new users. If you want to explore other uses for Clonezilla, you will need to do research and exploration yourself, as for me, this is all I need.   Why use Clonezilla Live instead of another backup program?   1. Clonezilla Live is FREE and OPEN SOURCE.   2. Clonezilla Live is outside of your current operating system and can make a bootable clone of nearly any current boot disk from a current OS and boot loader. For more details, see the Clonezilla website: http://www.clonezilla.org   3. Clonezilla Live is fast. Well, relatively speaking I guess, at least for most disks. It only clones the used data portion of the disk, saving time. Connecting my computer to a refurbished Western Digital Caviar Blue 250GB drive in an old-and-really-cheap USB 2.0 case, a clone of my startup drive with about 60GB of data took about 21 minutes. Connecting to a 250 GB SSD in a modern USB3 SuperSpeed Case, the same clone took 4 minutes (running at near 20 GB/min speed).   4. Clonezilla Live creates a bare metal backup. What that means is that if everything goes sideways, you could buy new hardware matching your current specs, properly set up the BIOS, then use Clonezilla to restore the information and boot sectors to a new drive and you would be back in business. [i have not tried this with a new disk, but have reloaded my system several times form backup with perfect results.]   5. Unlike some commercial cloning programs that run within the Mac OS (or others), there is no need to reinstall the boot loader after the clone is made. The disk is ready to use right after being made.   What are the disadvantages to using Clonezilla Live?   1. Finding the correct version and creating a usable USB stick, CD, or DVD can be difficult and intimidating for those with a less technical background.   2. The user interface, while very usable, is a bit of an antique. It looks and acts like it belongs in ye olde computer museum. This further adds to the difficulty and intimidation factor for new and less technically skilled users.   3. Clonezilla cannot do incremental backups. It only does whole disk copies.   4. Clonezilla can be very picky about cloning to a drive the is not equal to or greater in size than the source disk – even down to the last sector block.   Hopefully this tutorial will help some of you get started with this very useful program.         The Setup   You need a disk for your backup. The Clonezilla instructions say “the destination partition must be equal or larger than the source one.” So technically, you want a disk equal in size to the one you are Cloning (or a partition of equal size, but this tutorial is ONLY about the BASICS, so we will just use the whole disk). Now, it is true that the program only copies the data portion of the disk, so it is possible that this will work with two different size disks, but this is not supported by the Clonezilla documentation (unless you use Expert Mode, but this tutorial is ONLY for BASICS, remember). Having said that, I used a 1 TB disk for backup and restored the clone to a 250 GB drive with no problems, but this may not always work.   For the purposes of this tutorial, I will stick to just a 250 GB internal SSD startup disk, and an external 250 GB hard disk backup for simplicity.   Download Clonezilla   As stated above, getting the correct version can be intimidating for new users. Almost all modern hardware that is being used for a Hackintosh will use the Ubuntu based version that can be downloaded from the link below. Be sure to download the ISO file. The download options should look like this before pressing the down load button (you want the version labeled amd64 even if you have an Intel processor).     Clonezilla Download   Take the ISO image out of your downloads folder and place it on the desktop before continuing to the next step.       Create a bootable USB flash drive from the ISO file   While you COULD use a CD or DVD for this purpose, why would you go for such old technology when a USB flash drive with work better and faster.   Before I start: I am using the brackets [ ] to denote something to be replaced in a command. You do not type the brackets, only the item described inside the brackets. If you still don’t understand any part, look at the completed example at the end of this section.   1. Insert your USB Flash Drive. Since the ISO file is only about 200 MB, you won’t need a very large drive. I don’t think it even matters what the current file system is on the drive for this because it will all be erased in this process (I have done this with both GUID and FAT32 systems).   2. Open Terminal (in the finder, use the Go menu and choose Utilities, there you will find Terminal.app)   3. Type
    diskutil list  to get a list of connected drives. Note the identifier for your drive (disk1 in my example)   4.  Unmount your USB drive with the following command.  diskutil unmountDisk /dev/[your disk identifier]   5. Copy the ISO image to your USB drive with the following command. Note that you should start typing until “if=“ and then drag the ISO image from the desktop to the insertion point to get its path before continuing to type the rest of the command. sudo dd if=[drag your ISO image from the desktop to here to get its path] of=/dev/r[your disk identifier] bs=1m When you press enter your will be prompted for your password. Enter it and press return. Be patient as it will take a bit of time with no indication that anything is happening other than the fact that the $ prompt has not reappeared yet.   dd is a direct sector disk copy utility if=  specifies the source disk or image of= specifies the destination disk or image /dev/ means device r before the disk identifier apparently speeds up the process bs=1m specifies the size of block to read at one time (if this is not working you can try bs=1M)   See sources How to Copy and ISO to a USB Drive from Mac OS X with dd and Disk Management From the Command-Line, Part 1 for more information.   When finished it will give a message about what was copied. Also, a warning should appear on your desktop indicating that the disk is not readable by your computer:     This is another indication that you followed the steps correctly – IMPORTANT! Click on the Ignore button to dismiss the warning.   5. IMPORTANT! After dismissing the warning, go back to the terminal. Enter the command 
    diskutil list again. You should see your USB drive with something like “FDisk_partition_scheme.”   6. Eject your USB drive by issuing the command 
    diskutil eject /dev/[your disk identifier]  You should get a message that the disk was ejected. Remove the USB drive at this time, and use something to write Clonezilla on its case so you know what it is.   Here is the text of the entire process on my computer for reference:
    Last login: Sun Oct 11 09:06:17 on console Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil list /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *250.1 GB disk0 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS El Capitan 249.2 GB disk0s2 /dev/disk1 (external, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *7.9 GB disk1 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk1s1 2: Apple_HFS Clonezilla 7.6 GB disk1s2 Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil unmountDisk /dev/disk1 Unmount of all volumes on disk1 was successful Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ sudo dd if=/Users/anachronaut/Desktop/clonezilla-live-20150805-vivid-amd64.iso of=/dev/rdisk1 bs=1m Password: 191+0 records in 191+0 records out 200278016 bytes transferred in 6.947753 secs (28826301 bytes/sec) Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil list /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *250.1 GB disk0 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS El Capitan 249.2 GB disk0s2 /dev/disk1 (external, physical): #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: FDisk_partition_scheme *7.9 GB disk1 1: 0xEF 7.5 MB disk1s2 Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ diskutil eject /dev/disk1 Disk /dev/disk1 ejected Anachronauts-Computer:~ anachronaut$ The following seems like a lot of steps, but it all goes quite quickly once you get the idea.     Boot from your Clonezilla Live USB drive to clone your startup disk   1. Shut down your computer   2. Insert your Clonezilla Live USB drive into an active USB port. Clonezilla does seem to use USB3 speeds, so this may be a good option. (Although this is probably only relevant to your backup drive, not the USB stick).   3. Attach your backup disk to another USB port (USB3 if available) if your are using an external backup drive (highly recommended).   4. Power up your computer while holding down the key for choosing boot options. Since I am using an ASUS board this is f8, but this varies by manufacturer, so check your manual if you are not sure.   5. Choose to boot from your Clonezilla USB drive. It should be the one with the smaller capacity. Don’t worry if you have an older USB backup drive that does not show up at this point, we can get it to show later. You will see some text, and then Clonezilla will start. Here is what my boot options list looked like:     For all of the following Clonezilla screens, it is usually easiest to use the arrow keys and the enter key to select your options. Ignore the part in the onscreen Clonezilla instructions about using the space key. Most of the time, if you don't know, just stick with the default options.   6. Choose screen resolution   7. Choose language   8. Choose keymap   Some text will fly by here and then…   9. Choose Start Clonezilla   10. Choose device to device clone   11. Choose Beginner Mode   12. Choose disk_to_local_disk   13. Choose source disk.   Notice in the above image, that my 250 GB external disk does not show here. If the target disk doesn’t appear, as like the image here, choose cancel (use the mouse). Turn the external drive off, and then back on again (or disconnect and reconnect if no external power) and then follow the onscreen instructions to restart Clonezilla. It should appear in the list the next time.   14. Here is the source disk chooser after restarting Clonezilla and getting back to this point. Notice that both 250 GB disks now appear. I will choose the M.2 drive for the source, and the WD drive for the target from here.   15. Choose target disk. This will be erased so be sure you have the right one.   16. Choose to skip repair.   17. Press Enter to continue.   18. Enter y and then y again to confirm erasure of your disk. This is your last chance to back out if you did not choose the correct target disk, so double check you are correct.   19. Watch the progress, or go do something else for a while.   20. Press enter to continue again.  
    21. IMPORTANT! Choose to Poweroff. Once the computer has shut down, remove the Clonezilla USB drive and your external backup drive before starting your computer again.   You should now have a nearly identical, bootable clone to your startup disk. To restore a system, just reverse the choices with the Source and Target disks.  
    One final note: Despite appearances, Clonezilla is still in active development. When I first downloaded and used Clonezilla Live, the file name was clonezilla-live-20150805-vivid-amd64.iso, when writing this tutorial, I downloaded the latest version which is clonezilla-live-20151012-wily-amd64.iso. Notice that the date of issue is conveniently coded in the name, the latest version being issued on October 12, 2015.
  10. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from viking07 in El Capitan & Windows 10 problems   
    img10? If that is the image of the BIOS boot entries, then my recent post may help:
     
     
    Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems
  11. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from bboczeng in Clover with Mac skylake CPU support?   
    True in the open market, but H170 or something like that is coming soon. It wouldn't be out of the question for Apple to make a deal to get these chipsets (iMac = MILLIONS of computers) before they are released to the general public. Maybe not custom chips, but normal production chipsets before they are available to us.
  12. Like
    Anachronaut reacted to cwestpha in Nvidia Web Driver updates for El Capitan (UPDATE 07/11/2018)   
    One thing to remember is, if you are using something that allows OS X to have an emulated NVRAM or partial access to your real system NVRAM, nvda_drv=1 and similar can be added your NVRAM locations. This can cause interesting side effects with your clover or other NVRAM emulating/aware loaders. For example: you can have nv_disable=1 in the clover options at boot but the nvda_drv=1 flag can still be in the NVRAM from the web drivers installer. It can make some false alarms/interesting reboots since OS X boot is not always 100% reliable for dealing with conflicting boot flags. 
  13. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  14. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  15. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from 84mac in [How To] Remove Extra Clover BIOS Boot Entries & Prevent Further Problems   
    Clover is a great boot loader, however, some people are still having problems. I think a lot of this has to do with the design of the systems. Many have extra backup internal hard drives or partitions with legacy boot loaders or previous Clover systems. While this may have been fine in the past, with Clover and the newer OS X's, this does not work on many motherboards.    Often it happens that Clover and El Capitan (or Yosemite) will install and seem to work fine, but then degenerate to an unusable state. I chased this problem for quite a while before I found the solution (see Source #1 below).   Look at the boot options list in your BIOS. If you see entries that are not physical drives, it is likely that you are encountering some form of this problem.   First, remove all of the extra boot entries.   0. You COULD try to reflash the BIOS and you MAY be done. This worked on my 6 series board, but not on my current 9 series. If it works for you, skip to the second section on preventing the problem from happening again. If this does not work, or if you really don't want to have to flash the BIOS, then continue.   1. Disconnect all drives except one with only one instance of Clover. If you only have a partitioned drive with ANY backups on the partitions, it is probably best to boot with only the Clover Install USB stick and no other drives attached.   2. Boot your system and press the right arrow key when the Clover boot loader appears.   2b. If you cannot get to Clover, reset your CMOS and try again, this time going into the BIOS and selecting your physical drive for boot override. DO NOT touch any other entries at this point as it may lock the BIOS and you will need to reset the CMOS and start over again. It SHOULD work, so keep trying – I don't know another way.   3. Use the right and left arrow keys to select the Clover UEFI Shell and hit enter. The following screen should appear, and either let it time out, or press a key:     4. At the Shell> prompt type
    bcfg boot dump the results should look something like this:     5. You need to remove any entry that is not a physical hard drive. As far as I know, if it is a real physical disk, it will list as DevPath - HD.       The code to remove an entry looks like this:
    bcfg boot rm XX where XX is the Option number. In this example, I remove Option 02 with
    bcfg boot rm 02       If you have a LOT of bogus entries, it is best to do just a few, and then type the command
    bcfg boot dump again before repeating the process. When I first did this on my ASUS H97 board, I had at least 10 entries to clear so it took several iterations of this process.   6. When your have removed all entries that are not physical hard drives, type
    exit and press the return key. This will get you back to the main Clover screen. At this point, I would choose restart from the Clover choices and enter the BIOS to check if your work was successful.       Second, rethink your system design and backup scheme to prevent this from happening again.   • Design your system so that there is only one disk (an SSD if you like speed) that has an EFI partition that contains the Clover boot loader. Of course in OS X, all (I think) formatted drives will have an EFI partition, but you do not want two EFI partitions that contain ANY boot loader – that includes Clover, Chameleon, Chimera or whatever.   • On some boards, it may help to set the boot options for all devices to UEFI Only (didn't make a difference on my board, but did speed up boot time).   • Currently, I have a 250 GB M.2 SSD as my boot disk, and the others are just for data. For backups I use EXTERNAL DISKS, so that I don't reencounter the same problems. The external drives are connected only when I need to backup. [i am working on a GUIDE for Clonezilla.] External USB 2.0 or USB 3.0 drive enclosures are quite reasonably priced at the moment, so I encourage you to do this as well. I think you could use Time Machine for data backup, but I have no experience with this.   • Currently I am only running Mac OS X 10.11 El Capitan. It would be great to hear about successful system designs in the same way I am discussing here from others who are also running Windows, Linux or other versions of Mac OS X       Source #1 - Thanks to trioset
  16. Like
    Anachronaut reacted to pokenguyen in [GUIDE] USB Fix El Capitan 10.11   
    How to fix Intel USB ports in OS X El Capitan
     
    my thanks to stinga111 and VCH888 for contribution in USB problems
     
     
    After some time try to fix USB ports on El Capitan, I just realize that 10.11 has a new mechanism to constraint the USB ports to your SMBIOS. If your Intel USB ports work just fine (without GenericUSBXHCI) but stop working on 10.11, it's probably your ports are not defined in SMBIOS.
     
    The ports may work after you change to another SMBIOS with suitable ports, but you can edit the ports for your SMBIOS.
     
    1. Load the USB kexts
     
    The new kexts controlling USB in 10.11 are AppleUSBEHCIPCI.kext and AppleUSBXHCIPCI.kext inside IOUSBHostFamily.kext. You can check the ports of your current SMBIOS by opening these files:
     
    USB 2.0
    /System/Library/Extensions/IOUSBHostFamily.kext/Contents/PlugIns/AppleUSBEHCIPCI.kext/Contents/Info.plist USB 2.0 and USB 3.0
    /System/Library/Extensions/IOUSBHostFamily.kext/Contents/PlugIns/AppleUSBXHCIPCI.kext/Contents/Info.plist System will now attach AppleUSBEHCIPCI kext to device name EHC1 and EHC2 by default, you can check the info.plist:
     

     
     
    So make sure your USB 2.0 device name is already in the kext. You can change IONameMatch to match the USB 2.0 name in DSDT, or you can rename USB 2.0 device in DSDT to EHC1/EHC2 (depend on SMBIOS in info.plist)
     
    For USB 3.0, it's different. Instead of using name (IOMatch), AppleUSBXHCIPCI will use ID to attach kext to USB 3 device in DSDT
     

     
    So even if your USB 3.0 device is renamed XHC1 or XHC, the kext will load if your device id is matched.
     
    2. Ports Restriction
     
    Even when the USB kexts are load, it still does not mean that all the ports in your system work, because Apple has implemented a new method to control which ports are available for a SMBIOS.
     
    Please note that if your USB 3.0 device is not named XHC1 (typically XHC), there is no port restriction by default, but if all your ports do not work completely, you may want to enable port restriction and add your ports manually.
     
    For example, in iMac 13,1 SMBIOS:
     

     
    By default, for EHC1, there is one port available (port-count 01000000=0x00000001 bit flip) and that port is at address 1, note that the port name is not important. If your system has more ports at other addresses, those ports will be disabled!
     
    The same for XHC1, MacBookPro 9,2 will only have ports at address 1, 2, 5, 6 available:
     

     
    To fix the problems, there are two methods: remove ports restriction or adding ports.
     
    2a. Remove Ports Restriction
     
    This is the easy way, you just need to remove port-count and ports in info.plist, system will auto grab the ports from your DSDT!
     

     
    For USB 3.0, you can also remove port-count and ports, or just name your USB 3.0 device in DSDT to XHC (actually any name, out of XHC1).
     
    Some SMBIOS like iMac14,x do not have port restriction for USB 2.0, so you can set those SMBIOS if you get "still waiting for root device" caused by not-working USB 2.0 ports
     

     
    However, Apple set a limit of 15 ports for one USB device, so if your DSDT define more than 15 ports, only first 15 ports will be recognized by system! In this case, you have to enable ports restriction and add  your ports as guided in 2b.
     
    2b. Add ports to Ports Restriction
     
    In this method, you will enable port restriction and add your ports.
     
    To enable port restrictions:
    - For USB 2.0, rename your USB to EHC1/EHC2 or change IONameMatch.
    - For USB 3.0, rename your USB to XHC1 or change IONameMatch.
     
    Then, you have to identify which ports you have in your DSDT. For example, my XHC1 has ports at 1, 2, 3, 4:
     

     
    However, the SMBIOS MacBookPro9,2 I'm using only contains ports 1, 2, 5, 6 (note that port name is not important):
     

     
    So I had to add ports 3 4, and the ports work again!
     

     
    Please note that there is still a limitation of 15 ports (discovered by VCH888). For example: If your DSDT defined 14 USB 2.0 ports HS01->HS14 and 6 USB 3.0 ports SS01->SS06, OS X will only recognize HS01->HS14 and SS01.
     
    To fix this problem, you have to identify which ports are real and which ports are unavailable, then add only valid ports. You can find example here: http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/topic/306777-guide-usb-fix-el-capitan-1011/?do=findComment&comment=2147401
     
     
    3. Injector USB kexts
     
     
    Instead of editing kexts directly, which will be lost after OS X update, you can use injector kexts (thanks to RehabMan).
     
    If you want to edit info for your USB 2.0 (controlled by EHCI), make sure you rename EHC1/EHC2 in your DSDT to something else (like EH01/EH02), so that the EHC1/EHC2 port restriction in original Apple kexts does not apply to your system, then you create an injector kext (which is basically a Info.plist) to add port information to your new EH01/EH02.
     
    For USB 2.0/3.0 controlled by XHCI, make sure your XHCI device is not XHC1, so that the XHC1 port restriction in original Apple kexts does not apply to your system, then you create an injector kext (which is basically a Info.plist) to add port information to your new XHCI.
     
    You can take example of the kext here: https://raw.githubusercontent.com/RehabMan/HP-ProBook-4x30s-DSDT-Patch/master/USBXHCI_4x40s.kext/Contents/Info.plist
     
    Just create a folder YourKext.kext/Contents, copy Info.plist to Contents folder and edit info.plist to suit your need.
    DummyUSBEHCIPCI.kext.zip
    DummyUSBXHCIPCI.kext.zip
  17. Like
    Anachronaut reacted to XTuga in Clover mess up my motherboard?   
    Hi everyone
     
    Even if I remover all my HDD and don't have any device connected to my motherboard, I still get those two entries, on the boot menu or in the BIOS.
     

     
    Why and how do why remove it?
     
    Same happen with Gigabyte and ASUS motherboards.
     
    Already try flash the BIOS, put a older or newer version and even remove the battery from the motherboard. Nothing work...
  18. Like
    Anachronaut got a reaction from Alessandro17 in Introduce yourself.   
    Hello!
     
    I am a LONG time Mac user (since 1984), and I currently own 4 Macs. One is a PowerMac G4 Cube that is currently non-functional. My Powermac G5 that is being used as a HTPC has a failed HDD, other problems, and is just too old to keep current with software (especially Flash!). I have given up on waiting for Apple to build a sensible, headless, midrange Mac, but there is a glimmer of renewed hope now that Steve Jobs is out of the picture. I thought about another Mac Mini (I own 2), but there are just to many external peripherals required. The only other options is a Mac Pro, but I feel it is too big (as big as my G5!) and way too expensive. Therefore I decided to try build one for myself from PC parts and then try to get it to work.
     
    My build will be a HTPC with an Intel i7 2600 and an nVIdia GTX 550 ti. I want it to work with EyeTV, iTunes, Decibel (a better music player), and of course internet sources like Hulu and YouTube. I would also like to get it to play Blu-Rays and DVDs for a full home theater all-in-one.
     
    This is my first complete build, so wish me luck!
     
    Oops! I actually own 5 Macs. I forgot about the Quadra 660AV sitting in storage.
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