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PookyMacMan

Retired
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  1. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  2. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  3. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  4. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  5. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  6. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  7. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  8. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  9. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  10. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  11. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  12. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  13. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  14. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  15. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  16. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  17. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  18. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  19. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from Allan in [Rumor] Apple wants bring mobile Apps to the next macOS update - Good idea?   
    Universal binaries are hardly a new concept for Apple's OS. They, of all companies, know all about the...quirks...of mixing processor architectures 
     
    In the past though, whether Universal binaries were for 68k/PPC or PPC/Intel, notice the OS was always the same. You built a single code base, and compiled for multiple architectures. So logically, macOS and iOS should be nearly one and the same for this plan to be effective. And while I like that idea in principle, it makes me nervous, because Apple's infamous tendencies toward mobile-oriented experiences would hint that it is more likely for Apple to remove valuable features from the system. And/or switch Macs to ARM architecture (actually not an unreasonable or novel prediction).
     
    Imagine having to jailbreak a Mac. That would be horrifying.
     
     
     
    Can't speak for Opera of course, but I wouldn't be surprised if most pro music software wouldn't make it on there regardless of reasonable changes. Soft synth manufacturers really, really, really don't want to play by anyone's rules but their own, especially the more they cost. MAS would make licensing schemes like EastWest's (using iLok) impossible, and some like Native Instruments are probably perfectly comfortable with their own licensing methods. But that's a bit of a tangent 
  20. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  21. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from DaFrigN in Pin Config Patching VoodooHDA 0.2.7.2 Project OS X Branch   
    Got my MacBook early, and finished part 2!
     
    First, let's look at the first set of (byte-flipped) verbs from RegEdit:

    01171c40 01171d01 01171e43 01171f99
    If we apply our knowledge from part 1, we can see that this is for codec #0, and node 17 (notice that the node number is 11 in regedit, but converting it from hex to decimal it is 17). Looking at the VoodooHDA pin defaults in codecdump.txt for node 17 (nid 17), we have:

    0x99430140
    The format for the pin defaults is:

    0x[71f][71e][71d][71c]
    As we look at this, Voodoo has detected this output (S/PDIF) correctly. Now, the most important digits are those in 71c. The other digits are merely cosmetic, but 71c determines functionality. The last two digits are 71c, and we want the sequence to be 0. Here, we see that sequence is 0, so the output will show in System Preferences.
     
    Now the next node (18):
    Regedit:

    01271cf0 01271d11 01271e11 01271f41
    Voodoo:

    0x411111f0
    Voodoo has detected everything correctly. (Internal speaker), and the sequence is also 0.
     
    On node 20,
    Regedit:

    01471c10 01471d44 01471e01 01471f01
    For Voodoo:

    01014410
    This node also appears to be correct (Green Line-out), and it also has the proper association of 0.
     
    Now for the next one (21):
    Regedit:

    01571c12 01571d14 01571e01 01571f01
    Voodoo:

    01011412
    Voodoo has detected it correctly (Black Line-out), but notice the sequence is 2. OS X won't be able to use the jack correctly when it is not 0, so we'll need to patch it. We'll patch the nodes at the end.
     
    For node 22:
    Regedit:

    01671c11 01671d64 01671e01 01671f01
    Voodoo:

    01016411
    It's detected correctly (Orange Line-out), but it has the same problem as the black line-out.
     
    For node 23:
    Regedit:

    01771c14 01771d24 01771e01 01771f01
    Voodoo:

    01012414
    Ditto for this Grey Line-out. Same problem as above two nodes.
     
    For node 24:
    RegEdit:

    01871c50 01871d9c 01871ea1 01871f01
    Voodoo:

    01a19c50
    This is actually an input (Pink Microphone - rear), and it is set up correctly with the sequence of 0.
     
    Now for node 25:
    Regedit:

    01971c60 01971d9c 01971ea1 01971f02
    Voodoo:

    02a19c60
    Correct (Pink Microphone - front), and the sequence is 0.
     
    Node 26:
    Regedit:

    01a71c5f 01a71d34 01a71e81 01a71f01
    Voodoo:

    0181345f
    This is correctly detected as a Blue Line-in, but we'll need to patch it later on because we don't like f for inputs, only outputs (more on the f value later on).
     
    Node 27:
    Regedit:

    01b71c20 01b71d4c 01b71e21 01b71f02
    Voodoo:

    02214c20
    This is the Headphone port, which has a sequence of 0, but most likely we're actually going to want it to be f with a default association of 1 (the same as Green Line-out). But if it's supposed to be 0, why would we want f? The reason why we would want f is for jack auto-detect; namely, if it is configured with a 71c figure of 1f, then when you plug something into the headphone port and it will disable the green line-out automatically and pipe it through to the headphone port, rather than having to go into System Preferences and changing the input manually. But, if that's what you prefer, that's OK. You don't have to add that patch when we get there.
     
    Node 28:
    Regedit:

    01c71cf0 01c71d11 01c71e11 01c71f41
    Voodoo:

    411111f0
    You'll notice this is the same as the other speaker. Why it's listed twice (actually, node 31 is also a speaker so there are 3) I don't know, other than there are three speaker outputs on your motherboard…? I don't think this matters much, correct me if I'm wrong.
     
    Next is node 30:
    Regedit:

    01e71c30 01e71d21 01e71e45 01e71f01
    Voodoo:

    01452130
    Correct and it's 0 (it's the other S/PDIF Out).
     
    Last is node 31, but if you look at it it's the other speaker, so we're done!! Now for the actual patching.
     
    Open Terminal (/Applications/Utilities) and type:

    sudo nano /System/Library/Extensions/VoodooHDA.kext/Contents/Info.plist
    Scroll down with the arrow keys down to (a long way down) where you see:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> </array>
    Next, create a new line after , indent it, and type . It should look like this:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> <dict> </array>
    Next, create a new line, indent twice (so it's one beyond ) like so:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> </array>
    Now, we'll need to insert the codec number for the node we're patching. Remember, the first digit in the Regedit dumps is the codec number, and if you look at the dump it is 0. So, we will add 0:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> </array>
    If it was 2, we would have 2, for example; others can change it to whatever it needs to be.
    Below it add Config:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> </array>
    Next, we will add the patch. Remember, we had nodes 21 (Black Line-out), 22 (Orange Line-out), 23 (Grey Line-out), and 26 (Blue Line-in) to patch because the sequence was not 0 for those. So, first, let's look at Voodoo's current config for node 21 (the first one we'll patch) again (not Regedit!):

    01011412
    What we must do is change the last digit (sequence) to 0, but if you look there is already a port with a sequence of 0 with a default association (the second to last digit) of 1 (namely, the green line-out). So, we must change the default association as well, to a digit that no other input/output has. So, lets take a look at which default associations are taken by jacks with a default association of 0:

    1 = nid 20 (Green Line-out) 2 = nid 27 (Headphones) 3 = nid 30 (S/PDIF Out) 4 = nid 17 (S/PDIF Out) 5 = nid 24 (Pink Microphone - rear) 6 = nid 25 (Pink Microphone - front) f = nid 18, 28, 31 (Speaker)
    Those are the default associations that we cannot use; you can check those node IDs and you will find that the sequence is 0 with those default association values. There is one exception, however - the headphones. Remember, we're going to change it anyway to a different default association, so that frees up default association 2. We'll use that for this black line-out. So, if you change the default association to 2 and the sequence to 0, the new config for node 21 is:

    01011420
    So, let's put 0x before it and place it between and below the Config key as follows:

    <key>NodesToPatch</key> <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> </array>
    Next we need to add Node:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> </array>
    Below it, we will add the node ID in decimal (which is Voodoo's format), so we'll add 21 in this case:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </array>
    And lastly, we'll add below the initial :

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> </array>
    And now the black line-out is patched and it will show up in System Preferences. Now, we're not finished, we need to add the other input/outputs. So, below the dict you added above create another dict with the Codec + codec number:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> </array>
    Now, for the config, node 22 (the next node to patch) is:

    01016411
    Looking back at our list of "occupied" default associations, the next lowest number we can use is 7. So, our new config looks like this:

    01016470
    And now we'll insert it in our NodesToPatch array:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01016470</string> </array>
    And lastly insert the node ID:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01016470</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>22</integer> </dict> </array>
    The next node to patch is node 23, also from codec 0. The current config is 01012414, so we'll change it to 01012480. Now let's insert the entire patch:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01016470</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>22</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01012480</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>23</integer> </dict> </array>
    See how this goes? Now let's apply the same thing to node 26:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01016470</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>22</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01012480</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>23</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01813490</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>26</integer> </dict> </array>
    So we changed to config from 0181345f to 01813490 so it will be usable.
     
    Now the last patch is optional if you want headphones to be auto detect; we still use the same process, and this is what it looks like:

    <array> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x0101420</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>21</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01016470</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>22</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01012480</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>23</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x01813490</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>26</integer> </dict> <dict> <key>Codec</key> <integer>0</integer> <key>Config</key> <string>0x02214c1f</string> <key>Node</key> <integer>27</integer> </dict> </array>
    And…we're done!!! :D Yahoo! Remember, also, that since VoodooHDA covers multiple codecs (i.e. HDMI and built-in inputs/outputs), you can insert patches for your other codecs in the same NodesToPatch array as the others.
     
    Now, lastly, to finish it up, press Control-O to save (and press enter to confirm), and Control-X to exit. Now, update the kext caches (see the FAQ). This is very important; if you don't update the caches the patches will not be applied.
     
    Once you update the caches, reboot, and enjoy all your audio ports. Hope this helped!!
  22. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  23. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  24. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
  25. Like
    PookyMacMan got a reaction from fabiosun in Why InsanelyMac does not support tonymacx86   
    Many users wonder why we do not support tonymac's products here at InsanelyMac. The reason is that we believe he is a commercial spin-off of the OSx86 scene, and it's not in the spirit of OSx86 to have commercial intents with development.
    These are the main reasons why we don't approve posting his material here (why he's a commercial spin-off):
     
    1. His software is not open source. This is often confused because most people equate open source software with free software. This is definitely true, but it doesn't grasp the entire scope of open source; open source also includes releasing source code for the product, which tonymac fails to do. The OSx86 community believes everything should be open source.
     
    2. The construction of his site is set up with emphasis on donation buttons and (affiliate) links to Amazon and Newegg, hinting at interests of profit.
     
    3. The intent of gaining profits is basically confirmed by marketing his projects with suggestions of donations as though he deserves it, even though his products (most notably #####) is a compilation of products/drivers developed by others (not himself) that any non-programmer could put together.
     
    4. You must pay for the tonymac software. Although this may seem reasonable considering the effort involved in building a customized installer for specific computer builds, again, it is not in the spirit of OSx86 to charge for software development, so the wiser idea would most likely be not to offer that service at all. Even though it may be nice for newbies, in my opinion it does not encourage education but rather laziness. I say this because the OSx86 movement is designed as an educational movement, where by hacking Mac OS X you can learn more about the operating system works, how computers work, etc., like how many of us do. However, the purpose of OSx86 is not a way to get a cheap Mac, which I personally believe is encouraged by tonymac's software considering it is marketed to perform a task without any sort of explanation of how it works.
     
    From another perspective: http://prasys.info/2011/01/tonymac-seriously/ This covers one of the issues brought up by developers.
     
    In two sentences: at InsanelyMac, we want to keep moral standards high and safeguard genuine developers.
    At tonymacx86 they take from others without giving credit.
     
    In order to make sure that it doesn't happen any longer, staff have now a new guideline:
     
     
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