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About Zulu.Walker

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    InsanelyMac Sage
  • Birthday 07/22/1983

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  1. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    Unfortunately, this Zulu doesn't have enough magic on him. Went back to 10.6.4 since I needed my system up and running.
  2. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    Just found out after a little probing around that NVRM is 10.6.5's NVidiaResMan. So it's probably a resolution issue since I can boot into 10.6.5 with the kext moving trick (but having only VESA graphics) without having to remove the EFI string in my com.apple.Boot.plist. I hope I have some luck getting this to work after playing around with some stuff.
  3. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    It seems like waiting a bit show that the letter "p" on the top left corner of the screen continues on and becomes "panic" - after waiting for about an hour it shows (first line): panic(cpu 2 caller 0x003bfbfa): NVRM[1/3:0:0]: Read Error 0x00002500: CFG 0x05eb10de 0x00100407 0xfa000000, BAR0 0xfa000000 0x94f3c000 0x0a0580b1, D0, P0/3 then Debugger called: <panic> then Backtrace (CPU 2), Frame : Return Address (4 potential then couldn't wait any longer and rebooted. NVRM in the error looks like it has something to do with the driver... read up somewhere that "NVRM errors are internal to the nvidia kernel module" (NVIDIA forums). Still don't know how to proceed with this - already reinstalled Snow Leopard using my 10.6.3 retail disc then updated to 10.6.4 (combo) to see if things work, then updated again to 10.6.5 (combo). Still got the black screen/panic before I got to the desktop. Back to 10.6.4 it seems.
  4. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    They must have done something different with how the graphics are handled, else it would easily work. I don't understand it as well as I want to, so there's nothing left for me to do but ask for help from someone who does...
  5. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    10.6.5 has, sadly, disabled the functionality of my GTX 295 following the instructions I have used in my earlier post. Does anyone know how to get it working again with 10.6.5? I do not understand why it fails to work (black screen before booting into desktop) as EFI should have enabled functionality even with the version change.
  6. sata cards 64bit

    You can use your Silicon Image 3124 (SiI/SIL3124) with 10.6.4 in 64-bit mode. CalDigit makes a 3124 PCIe card that had its drivers updated (since January/late last year actually) for 64-bit operation. http://www.caldigit.com/Support/CalDigit_FASTA4_2.1.0u.zip Haven't tested for stability - still in 32-bit mode for some peripheral drivers I use for work. But I'm pretty sure it'll be enough for those who need it. EDIT: Here's another driver for a similar 3124-based card, this time from Sonnet Tech. http://www.sonnettech.com/support/download...atapro_v224.dmg I don't know if this works since it seems as if Sonnet might have changed a few things (device ID) and if this is any similar to its other drivers, will have an installer that looks for those IDs. Maybe someone good can hack it? It's more recent and probably more stable. You can try any brand of controller that has a Silicon Image 3132 chipset, as long as it adheres to the reference design. Most of the 2-port cards for OS X are based on the 3132, and have relatively good driver support for 32- and 64-bit operation. Another alternative is a JMicron-based card - but be warned that earlier drivers had data corruption issues, but I'm pretty confident that that has mostly been fixed by now. Commonly available controllers have the JMB36x chipset, and retail cards for Macs have been seen with this chipset series. The trick is to look for a well-supported card under Mac OS X that is based on a reference design - a Windows-only card based on the same design (and cheaper) will almost be 100% compatible with the Mac card's drivers. But since there are only a handful of cards supported under Mac OS X that are based off reference designs, the cards/chipsets (3124/3132/JMB36x) I mention here are basically it. Of course there are other options like Highpoint and Seritek - just be prepared to pay more than normal. PS. I use a 3124 and 3132 card, so this is all firsthand experience. Also keep in mind that be it a PCI/PCI-X/PCIe card, the drivers work similarly.
  7. There are actually 64-bit drivers for the 3124 chipset, they were just not widely known. See my post here. I don't think that will work. See my recent post for a functional 64-bit driver for the 3124 chipset.
  8. Snow Leopard And Evga Gtx 295

    Just installed a reference single PCB GTX 295 under 10.6.3 which was promptly updated to 10.6.4 (after benches/tests of course). It's incredible how terrible the graphics card drivers for nvidia are for this point release. But yes, everything works well using Post #33 in this link. Shaders/CUDA/OpenCL perform very close to that of a GTX 280/285 but with overall performance a bit better than a GTX 260 (since Mac OS X detects each core as a separate device). I didn't have to migrate any old kexts or whatever. I hope 10.6.5 offers better nvidia performance overall. And I hope they don't kill support for the GT200/b since these cards still rock even under Win7 (and I have a GTX 260 SP216, a GTX 275 OC 1792MB which is FULLY FUNCTIONAL even with ProApps, a GTX 285 OC, and now a GTX 295 - all using EFI). These cards are real cheap now pre-owned and most even have nice warranties left. Now I can transfer the GTX 285 that the 295 replaced to my real Mac Pro. Keep this thread alive - discuss and explore.
  9. fermi/gtx 480/gtx 470

    The next sensible thing to ask is: is it working as it should performance- and feature-wise? I too am really interested in dropping my old GTX 285 in favor of the new Fermi cards, but I'm still not sold that anyone has gotten this (470) or the 480 to work properly. Am I wrong in that assumption? I mean, dropping a GTX 285 in a hack is just like getting an EVGA GTX 285 Mac edition for a Mac Pro - and I don't think it's all the same (currently)? I'd love to get more CUDA cores on my hack and MP, and the PC parts can't be beat on the price.
  10. AHCI Dilemma

    You can't run XP in AHCI mode if you hadn't installed it first with the feature on. You're left with a. figuring out why your SL won't run with your drive in ATA mode or b. reinstall XP (or move on to Win7 64-bit). I'd go with b.
  11. Any recomended SATA cards

    SYBA SY-VIA-150 PCI SATA From the name it suggests that it's a VIA chipset. It may or may not work, but I really can't be sure - I tend to stay away from VIA chipsets. Maybe you could try and find out what chipset it has and see if anyone here has had any success with it, but I'm not entirely optimistic about it.
  12. Add FirmTek PCI Sata Controller?

    If it's a generic Silicon Image 3132 card, yes, you can boot Snow Leopard from it (if the card you purchased has a boot ROM, which most 3132 have). I have an eSATA drive with a clone of my boot drive that I use for troubleshooting. And if you're also wondering, you can also boot Windows 7 off it using an eSATA device (provided that you supply the drivers upon install).
  13. A cheap card based on the Silicon Image 3124 chipset has 4 internal or external ports, can be PCI or PCIe, and has generic drivers at the company's site. Bear in mind though that it will only run in 32-bit mode under Snow Leopard, which doesn't hinder its performance in any way AFAIK.
  14. Any recomended SATA cards

    If you have any spare PCIe slots, a cheap card based on the Silicon Image 3132 chipset is well supported in 32/64-bit mode. 3132 cards with RAID functionality are also compatible, but is only stable when using SATA Passthrough (non-raid).
  15. Run your Snow Leopard in 32-bit mode. AFAIK any 3124 card (raid or non-raid) isn't supported under 64-bit Snow Leopard. I have been using a SYBA 3124 PCI card for my 4 SATA optical drives for quite a while with complete success since 10.6. You can use any size of drive under SL 10.6.3 - the maximum size limitation lies on what your controller can support.