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Takuro

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About Takuro

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    InsanelyMac Legend

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    Male
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    New York
  1. This is really behaving wacky for me. I tried using the UUID for my boot camp partition on my internal HD, and it worked fine. I substituted the UUID for that of the brand new MyBook Mac Edition drive that I got for christmas, after freshly formatting it to NTFS, and it isn't working. I tried formatting my 5th gen iPod as NTFS too, and it refused to work with it. It looks like this isn't working with external drives for some reason. Weird part is, this used to work on my old external drive...
  2. Takuro

    Snow Leopard and Windows 7

    I'd have to say that Windows 7 may not as amazingly great as everybody is clamoring about. The reason for this is... and you might want to get your pitchforks and torches out... I honestly didn't think Vista was that bad. I think that the taboo surrounding Vista was so large that any small improvements between it and Windows 7 would be magnified 100-fold in the eyes the large, single-minded flocks of Vista-haters that always seem to unite under a common opinion. So now, the latest trend is to proclaim Windows 7 was a total rebirth of Windows as we know it. Is Windows 7 better, less prone to viruses, and prettier looking? Yes. But considering the milestones between XP and Vista, Vista to 7 isn't quite as large a jump. Not that anything's wrong with that. It's solid as a rock, and I've never gotten so much as a small bit of adware after using it for 6 months. Not bad. Now on to Snow Leopard. Similar to Windows 7, it represents a refinement more than a major upgrade. Currently, it's a bit less mature than Windows 7 in its development cycle and has had little exposure to the public because of Apple's tight-lipped NDA with developers. This is a pretty big contrast to 7, which has been openly available for the public for months. There's nothing in the current incarnation of Leopard that I'm wild about, and performance increases seem to be only moderate so far, although some announced technologies during WWDC 09 promise to make the OS super snappy. But for the moment, I just don't feel it's worth updating a system to SL. After September, yes, but not now. It's a pretty neck-and-neck situation between 7 and Snow Leopard. Both build upon their predecessors and offer various improvements in performance, with a sparse set of new features. At the moment, I'd have to say I slightly prefer Windows 7 over Snow Leopard, only because it feels closer to a finished product and has no issues whatsoever with backwards compatibility. Snow Leopard, on the other hand, is still a bit of a diamond in the rough, and seems to run a little slower and buggier than Win 7's interface. However, the final product may perform better than 7, so my opinion is open to change.
  3. Takuro

    Quicklook on Snow SUX.....

    I should update my sig I guess. I got a 24" iMac last summer. Oh well, I guess I keep it for nostalgia. OT: Not even Apple supports Apple hardware. Read up a it about how the Radeon Macs are getting screwed out of OpenCL even though they are capable of running it. Next time, don't be so quick to be such a fanboy.
  4. Takuro

    Quicklook on Snow SUX.....

    Quicklook is noticeably jerkier for me in 10.6 than it is in 10.5. Stacks are smoother though. Very strange.
  5. Eh, yeah. I just figured that out. Running the kernel in 64-bit mode made some basic tasks like launching apps about 20% faster, but after that, the apps ran either in 32 or 64-bit mode regardless of which kernel is used. For some reason, since the kernel is part of a lower layer of the operating system, I thought everything running on the application level would be limited to a subset of whatever architecture the kernel was. I don't know how OS X is completely structured, but I guess that, if this isn't the case, Applications might have more direct access to hardware so they can use whatever architecture they need regardless of the kernel. Losing 32-bit extensions was a blow though. I can't stand my mouse's crazy acceleration unless USBOverdrive is loaded to help control it. Back to the 32-bit kernel for now.
  6. I have a 2008 iMac with a Penryn and have to do the same thing to enable the 64-bit kernel. My main question is, why is Apple so determined not to let my iMac run 64-bit software? It even complains that "64-bit is not supported on your system" when I try to install Boot Camp drivers on Windows 7 x64. After hacking the installer MSIs, the drivers install fine! So what's the point? Why not just designate my system as supported out of the box?
  7. WWDC09 is fully abuzz after the opening keynote today. Although some hoped for major announcements and possibly a surprise appearance by Steve Jobs himself, this year's Apple event marked more of a transitional checkpoint than anything else. It slated a milestone in the maturation of Snow Leopard, the iPhone, and the company's long road to eco-friendliness. Oh, and there was some minor bashing of the newly announced Palm Pre too. Here's an overview of some of the major highlights, in the order they were announced: Apple Notebooks: Higher Specs, Dropped Prices - MacBook Air: Slashed to $1499, $1799 for SSD ($700 price cut!) - 13" MacBook: Now part of the "Pro" family. 7-hour battery, SD card slot, 8 GB ram, backlit keyboard, slashed to $1199 - 15" MacBook Pro: 7-hour battery, SD card slot, now supports up to 3.06 GHz CPU & 8 GB ram, slashed to $1699 - 17" MacBook Pro: price cut to $2499 (Note: The plastic 13" Macbook is still available for purchase. Its specs were silently bumped a few days prior to WWDC.) Snow Leopard - Uses a whopping 6 GB less disk space than Leopard, installing 45% faster - Minor signs of interface tweaks to designate it apart from Leopard. New, yet similar Aurora wallpaper. - MS Exchange support built into Mail, Calendar, and Address Book. - Expose is redesigned to conform to a more grid-like form factor. Clicking a dock icon now displays all active windows. - Stacks: Ability to scroll through its contents and browse its folders from directly within a stack. - Asian character recognition for trackpads. - Quicktime X: Redesigned, simpler interface. Pop-up controls. Easier video editing. (As seen in previous dev builds.) - Selective thread control based on an application's level of activity. (Basically, this boosts responsiveness.) - All above features will be available for test driving in the latest dev build, out today. - $29 upgrade for Leopard users, $129 for everybody else, hits stores in September. Safari 4 - Officially out of beta. Grab it now for Tiger, Leopard, and Windows. - Minor interface tweaks and improved history searching. - Crash Resistance: Plugin crashes no longer interrupt web browsing. (Exclusive to the Snow Leopard version?) iPhone OS 3.0 - All new features showcased in the iPhone 3.0 media event were re-iterated, including push notifications. - Tethering capabilities with multiple carriers. (AT&T doesn't plan on supporting this any time soon, however.) - MMS support. (AT&T will be late in supporting this, only making this feature available after by Fall. Great job, again!) - Language support for 30 new countries added. - "Find my iPhone." Locate lost or stolen iPhones via MobileMe. Ability to remotely sound audio alert or wipe disk. - TomTom is releasing an official GPS-based app, complete with an optional car kit. - Free for iPhone users, $9.99 for iTouch owners. Available June 17th. iPhone 3GS - Same general design, dimensions, and form-factor of 3G. No matte finish. - The added "S" stands for "speed." Faster CPU and more RAM than previous model, running apps 2x faster. - 3 Megapixel camera with auto-white-balance and tap-to-focus. Video recording support. (No front-facing camera.) - 7.2Mbps HSDPA data transfer and built-in hardware encryption. - Share video via MMS. (Again, AT&T will not be supporting this.) - Voice Control: Hold down the "home" button to give your iPhone audio commands for calls, music, and more. - Built-in digital compass. Integrated into Maps to orient it based on your relative position to magnetic or true north. - Comes in white and black variants. - $199 for 16GB version, $299 32GB. Available June 19th. - The 8GB 3G will be kept available in Apple stores, slashed to $99 starting today.
  8. Takuro

    WWDC 09 Overview

    WWDC09 is fully abuzz after the opening keynote today. Although some hoped for major announcements and possibly a surprise appearance by Steve Jobs himself, this year's Apple event marked more of a transitional checkpoint than anything else. It slated a milestone in the maturation of Snow Leopard, the iPhone, and the company's long road to eco-friendliness. Oh, and there was some minor bashing of the newly announced Palm Pre too. Here's an overview of some of the major highlights, in the order they were announced: Apple Notebooks: Higher Specs, Dropped Prices - MacBook Air: Slashed to $1499, $1799 for SSD ($700 price cut!) - 13" MacBook: Now part of the "Pro" family. 7-hour battery, SD card slot, 8 GB ram, backlit keyboard, slashed to $1199 - 15" MacBook Pro: 7-hour battery, SD card slot, now supports up to 3.06 GHz CPU & 8 GB ram, slashed to $1699 - 17" MacBook Pro: price cut to $2499 (Note: The plastic 13" Macbook is still available for purchase. Its specs were silently bumped a few days prior to WWDC.) Snow Leopard - Uses a whopping 6 GB less disk space than Leopard, installing 45% faster - Minor signs of interface tweaks to designate it apart from Leopard. New, yet similar Aurora wallpaper. - MS Exchange support built into Mail, Calendar, and Address Book. - Expose is redesigned to conform to a more grid-like form factor. Clicking a dock icon now displays all active windows. - Stacks: Ability to scroll through its contents and browse its folders from directly within a stack. - Asian character recognition for trackpads. - Quicktime X: Redesigned, simpler interface. Pop-up controls. Easier video editing. (As seen in previous dev builds.) - Selective thread control based on an application's level of activity. (Basically, this boosts responsiveness.) - All above features will be available for test driving in the latest dev build, out today. - $29 upgrade for Leopard users, $129 for everybody else, hits stores in September. Safari 4 - Officially out of beta. Grab it now for Tiger, Leopard, and Windows. - Minor interface tweaks and improved history searching. - Crash Resistance: Plugin crashes no longer interrupt web browsing. (Exclusive to the Snow Leopard version?) iPhone OS 3.0 - All new features showcased in the iPhone 3.0 media event were re-iterated, including push notifications. - Tethering capabilities with multiple carriers. (AT&T doesn't plan on supporting this any time soon, however.) - MMS support. (AT&T will be late in supporting this, only making this feature available after by Fall. Great job, again!) - Language support for 30 new countries added. - "Find my iPhone." Locate lost or stolen iPhones via MobileMe. Ability to remotely sound audio alert or wipe disk. - TomTom is releasing an official GPS-based app, complete with an optional car kit. - Free for iPhone users, $9.99 for iTouch owners. Available June 17th. iPhone 3GS - Same general design, dimensions, and form-factor of 3G. No matte finish. - The added "S" stands for "speed." Faster CPU and more RAM than previous model, running apps 2x faster. - 3 Megapixel camera with auto-white-balance and tap-to-focus. Video recording support. (No front-facing camera.) - 7.2Mbps HSDPA data transfer and built-in hardware encryption. - Share video via MMS. (Again, AT&T will not be supporting this.) - Voice Control: Hold down the "home" button to give your iPhone audio commands for calls, music, and more. - Built-in digital compass. Integrated into Maps to orient it based on your relative position to magnetic or true north. - Comes in white and black variants. - $199 for 16GB version, $299 32GB. Available June 19th. - The 8GB 3G will be kept available in Apple stores, slashed to $99 starting today.
  9. Takuro

    I think i find the T61 graphics problem

    It's been a full year since people have been messing with Thinkpads with 140m's trying to get QE and CI working in Leopard. I think this problem is long over-do for a solution, so I'll definitely cheer you on. I'd like to go back to college in my spring semester with one of the only fully functional installation of Leopard on the Thinkpads my school gave us. Hehe...
  10. I called AppleCare and they said that sometimes iMacs, although generally one of their more durable products, can get blemishes and defects. Even though my attempts to fix it exacerbated it, they told me they'd fix it because it already had an initial problem and therefore it isn't really "accidental damage." I think part of their ego is hurt by the fact that it wasn't perfect when fresh out of the package. So basically, at any time between now and Summer 2009 I can drop it off and get my system a shiny new aluminum casing. Either that, or they are going to just give me a new system altogether and transfer an imagine of my hard disk onto the new one. Whichever option is easier. And I'm not really RIPPING them off... it's a $2,000+ system... and when you can easily get a similar machine for nearly half the price, I'd expect it should at least come with very flexible maintenance plans.
  11. I got an iMac a couple months ago and noticed a really small impression in the brushed aluminum on the very front left side, in plain view on the computer. I ignored it for a few months but then attempted to fix it by gently rubbing some fine-grain sandpaper around it in a circular motion, but I wound up digging through the finish a bit and creating a very shiny, scratched area. What was once a small eye sore is now a pretty big one. Are there any products I can buy to fix the finish? This thing is brand new and I'm royally pissed at myself for doing this. Could I possibly turn it in to an Apple store and claim it had the blemish since I got it, and ask if they could fix the aluminum face or maybe replace it? I mean, it's not a TOTAL lie since the top corners of the display came with little nicks in them when I opened it out of the box, in addition to the little impression in the front. For now I'm going to use one of those handy white Apple stickers to place over it.
  12. After yesterday's tumultuous excitement over MobileMe, the iPhone 3G, and Snow Leopard, another unannounced development has slipped under the radar. Today, Apple released an early preview of Safari 4.0 on its Apple Developer Connection website. Just a little over a year since betas of the Safari 3 browser began to become available to the public, its successor promises to begin laying down the foundation of the next iteration of the Mac OS X operating system - Snow Leopard. Like Snow Leopard, Safari 4 is primarily focused on performance enhancements, especially in its underlying WebKit engine, rather than new features and UI changes, scoring an impressive 98% on the Acid 3 test. Currently, this early preview of Safari 4 is only available to developers and requires Safari 3.1.1 to install the update. As of this morning, it has also been spotted aboard a certain pirate ship docked in a bay.
  13. Takuro

    Safari 4.0 Developer Preview Released

    After yesterday's tumultuous excitement over MobileMe, the iPhone 3G, and Snow Leopard, another unannounced development has slipped under the radar. Today, Apple released an early preview of Safari 4.0 on its Apple Developer Connection website. Just a little over a year since betas of the Safari 3 browser began to become available to the public, its successor promises to begin laying down the foundation of the next iteration of the Mac OS X operating system - Snow Leopard. Like Snow Leopard, Safari 4 is primarily focused on performance enhancements, especially in its underlying WebKit engine, rather than new features and UI changes, scoring an impressive 98% on the Acid 3 test. Currently, this early preview of Safari 4 is only available to developers and requires Safari 3.1.1 to install the update. As of this morning, it has also been spotted aboard a certain pirate ship docked in a bay.
  14. Takuro

    New 9.2.2 ToH kernel

    Prescotts have SSE3. However, hey don't support NX. Maybe this one isn't patched for No NX and HPET. Regardless, it just isn't working.
  15. Takuro

    New 9.2.2 ToH kernel

    I have an Intel Pentium 4 Prescott. This kernel doesn't work for me. At boot, I get numerous errors, ending in one final diskarb error that prevents the system from booting. Even though I ran the TimeMachine update, the 9.2.0 kernel still works fine with the newer system files. Until a better kernel is released, I'll stick to the old one.
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