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WhatTheTech

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  1. Thanks
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from Akowoista in [worklog] Darkmac Pro   
    YOU ARE A LIFESAVER!!!
     
    I lost a hard drive and only had a few of the photos from the pre-anodizing stage left! Thank you SO SO MUCH. I've been wanting to repost this project for years but didn't have the photos.
     
    For anyone finding this worklog, I will be re-hosting this project on my own site - you can find them here shortly: https://gradivis.com/projects
  2. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from The Real Deal in [worklog] Darkmac Pro   
    All said and done, the total cost at Anodizing Specialists is $75, which is more than reasonable (it's a freakin' deal). I thought this would be a one-off for me, but at that price I'm doing a black G5 next!!
     
    Without tooting my own horn, I'm really loving it. Everything is starting to come together, and I rebuilding the top shelf, also painted with the same gray. I can't wait for it all to be done, except I have to because (a) the paint is still drying and ( I lost a couple of pieces somewhere in my office
  3. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from shawtyarabia in [Tutorial] - Fitting an ATX PSU Inside the G5 Power Supply   
    --------------------------------
    INTRO
    --------------------------------
     
    So, you've come to your senses and decided that you want to use the stock G5 enclosure eh? Good for you
     
    Jokes aside, I think it's about the cleanest way to include your PSU in a G5 mod, and it really isn't as hard as you may think. All it takes is a little modding know-how, a little safety, a dash of luck, and you will have yourself a clean looking hack! This tutorial is also permanently available on the G5Modders Tutorial Page.
     
    IMPORTANT SAFETY NOTE: PSUs contain capacitors that can give you a nasty shock and possibly do some real damage. General safety tips would include leaving your psu unplugged for a few days, flipping the power button a few times after that to discharge any stored current, and touching the capacitors with an electronics-grade insulated screwdriver (link) to aid in discharge. I'm not responsible for any damage to person or equipment!
     
    There are a couple methods to this modification, two of which are discussed. The first option is to keep the PSU inside its original casing, cutting down the walls to fit inside the G5 enclosure. The benefits of this method are a stronger attachment for any modular plugs, as well as a flat surface for attaching the PSU to the enclosure. The down side is that you have to cut your ATX casing, not only adding difficulty but also making sure your warranty is totally shot. The second method is to remove the PSU from its original casing entirely to fit inside the G5 enclosure. The benefits of this method are an easier mod overall with no cutting, better airflow and (almost certainly) an easier fit. The only real caveat is that if you're using a modular PSU, the plugs will no longer be attached to anything solid barr custom fabrication.
     
    Each method has its pros and cons, but the great part is that each method leaves you with a clean-looking mod in the end. Take some time to weigh the above pros and cons, and choose which method is best for you! In case you're interested, the proper terminology for the G5 power supply is "TeslaConverter", but I find using this term produces blank looks from many-a G5 modder, so PSU enclosure it is!
     
     
    You will need:
     
    - Powermac G5 PSU Enclosure
    - An ATX power supply, modular preferred
    - A pair of metal cutters/a dremel/a jigsaw
    - A philips-head screwdriver
    - Soldering iron, solder, heatshrink (optional)
     
     
    --------------------------------
    TUTORIAL
    --------------------------------
     
     
    STEP 1: STRIPPING THE G5 PSU ENCLOSURE
     
    Here's the stock G5 psu in all its glory. There are eight screws that you will need to remove to gain access to the internals, I have marked them for your convenience:
     

     
     
    Two of the screws may be hidden by plastic moulding that surrounds the cables as they exit. They can be tricky to spot, but once you have removed them you can remove the top cover. As you can see, I have also marked the location of the screws that hold the internals down to the actual enclosure. This may vary a little depending your year of manufacture (and possible even your country of residence) but generally there are five that need to come out:
     

     
     
    Don't forget to unplug the fans from the PCB! If you are keeping the stock power socket (recommended) simply cut the three wires as close to the PCB as you can, you'll need some room to splice later!
     

     
     
    And here she is, ready for the transplant:
     

     
     
    ---------------------------------------------
    STEP 2: PREPPING THE ATX PSU CASE
    ---------------------------------------------
     
    Assuming you didn't electrocute yourself, let's move on. For this mod, I'm using the Corsair Modular CX430M and will be demonstrating the first method discussed in the introduction. Most of the information still applies to the other method! When choosing a power supply for the first two methods, just make sure that it uses a standard width fan on top, so that the internals are low enough to be put in the G5 case. Honestly if you can afford it, a modular power supply is really going to save you a lot of hassle in the long run. More than with a regular computer case, space is in high demand inside the enclosure! People have alleviated this lack of space by using an SFX-factor PSU. Despite still needing the cutting of or removal from its original casing, being a smaller form-factor it leaves you much more space to work with!
     

     
     
    Ready to void that warranty?
     

     
     
    Here you can see what I mean about the height of the heatsinks:
     

     

     
     
    It's a good idea at this point to do a dry run with everything inside the G5 case. This way you can see if everything is going to fit before you destroy a perfectly good PSU:
     

     
     
    If it looks like clearance isn't a problem, it's time to get modding!
     
    If, like me, you are cutting the PSU enclosure, it's time to get out your cutting tool of choice and begin to cut down the PSU walls.
     

     
     
     
     
    ---------------------------------------------
    STEP 4: FITTING THE ATX PSU
    ---------------------------------------------
     
    Important Note: Make sure that the bottom of the enclosure has insulation, otherwise you're going to make the whole thing explode! The plastic left over from removing the Apple internals will be just fine, but any insulation-grade plastic will do.
     
     
    If you have decided to remove the PSU entirely from it's original casing (method 2), at this point you should remove it from the casing and place it inside the G5 enclosure, fixing it either by using screws, or double-sided tape will also work. Here's a picture of Mr D.'s modification following this method. You can see a gallery of the full process here, or head on over to his worklog.
     

     
     
    If you're cutting the original casing, put the PSU back inside the G5 enclosure, and make sure your cuts are at the correct height. I had to file down a little bit because they were a hair too high.
     

     
     
     
    That wasn't so hard was it? For each method, put the top cover on to make sure that everything does actually fit, then do a little jig when it does:
     

     
     
    Finally, you're going to want to plan where you want your cables coming out of. I used two of the G5's original cuttings to bring out a custom power cable (left in grey) and the motherboard ATX connector (center), but had to enlarge the hole on the right some for the modular cables and ATX power cable to come out of. Aside from that there really wasn't a lot of extra cutting involved!
     
    Here is the final shot with all the necessary cables coming out:
     

     
     
     
    ---------------------------------------------
    STEP 5: SPLICING THE POWER CABLE
    ---------------------------------------------
     
     
    Your final step is to splice in a power cable so that you can use the stock socket on the back of the G5. For this, you will need your soldering iron and heatshrink/electrical tape.
     
    First, strip down the wires attached to the stock plug. I stripped about 3/4" on the neutral and hot wires:
     

     
     
    At this point, put your heatshrink over the wire and push it to one side so the soldering doesn't shrink it accidentally.
     

     
     
    Now, solder the corresponding wires from your cable to the power socket. Generally, they should match in color but check your country's standard colorization for electrical wiring, it may differ.
     

     
     
    The grounds are easy, simply twist them together and screw them back in to the stock mounting hole. For a more elegant solution, simply purchase an eyelet to match the one shown, although this isn't necessary.
     

     
     
    Finally, apply heat to your heatshrink to create a tight fit, and you're done!!
     

     
     
    You can now run your cable to wherever it needs to go to be plugged in to the ATX PSU.
     

     
     
     
    --------------------------------
    CLOSING THOUGHTS
    --------------------------------
     
    You're done! Honestly, this really isn't as hard as you might think. Sure you can get all fancy by mounting modular sockets to the enclosure itself, but when it really comes down to it the only thing you have to worry about is getting a nasty shock, which can be generally avoided by following the red precautionary text at the beginning on this tutorial. As I mentioned at the beginning, each method has its own pros and cons, but the overarching principle here is that you can create a very sleek mod with relative ease.
     
    Thanks for reading, I hope this tutorial helps someone in deciding what to do with the PSU in their G5 mod!
  4. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from ameris_cyning in [Tutorial] - Hackintosh Bluetooth Module   
    INTRO
    This is about the easiest way of adding bluetooth to your hackintosh. Forget nervously waiting to see if the latest update will knock out your 3rd-party bluetooth, this uses an Apple bluetooth module that will never be phased out (or most likely not)!
     
    Permalink for this tutorial:
    http://www.whatthete...ntoshbluetooth/
     
    Parts Needed:
    Apple Bluetooth Module A1181 ($6 - Make sure you get one with the connector cable!)
    2 x 1N4001 Micro 1A Diodes ($4 for one hundred!)
    iMac Bluetooth Antenna ($7 - Much better reception than the A1118 antenna!)
    A USB Motherboard Header ($1.99)
     
    Tools Needed:
    This is a very easy modification, but you will also need a few tools:
    - Soldering Iron & solder
    - Heat Shrink tubing (1/8" or smaller - electrical tape not recommended for precision work)
    - Sleeving (optional - example)
     
    THE PROCESS:
     
    Step 1: Prepping the USB Cable
    First of all you will want to remove one end of the motherboard header so that just the pins or wires are left, as you can see on the far left of this image:
     

     
    Feel free to just cut one end off and strip down the individual wire casings, ready for soldering.
     
    Note: At this point it is recommend that you twist the data wires together along the entire length of the cable. This helps reduce EMI and should give you a more stable signal overall.
     
     
    Step 1.1: (Optional) Sleeving
    At this point, I would suggest putting the sleeve over your cable because once you've soldered everything it becomes a hassle. Simply slip the sleeving over your cut wires and push it down to the end, as pictured below (as well as one cut of heat shrink to stop that end fraying):
     

     
     
    Step 2: Prepping the Bluetooth Cable
    The USB cable is going to be attached to the cable that came with your Apple bluetooth module (pictured below), so also cut the end that would plug into the Apple motherboard (NOT the bluetooth module end). Take care to leave enough cable for soldering and then some. Mistakes are made, and my first bluetooth was ruined because I didn't leave room for error.
     
    You should be left with this:
     

     
     
    Step 3: The Diodes
    The diodes are important because the bluetooth module will not run on 5V - it needs to be around 3.7V, and may indeed WILL become damaged on regular USB power levels. The two diodes should be soldered into the red power wire nose-to-tail, with the forwards voltage soldered (i.e. going towards the bluetooth module) as shown.
     

     
    Step 4: The Other Wires
    As you can see from the diagram below, the rest of your soldering is quite simple. The black (ground) cables connect directly together, and the Data cables cross over colorswith green USB going to yellow bluetooth, and white USB going to green bluetooth. This is the main cause of non-working mods, so if nothing is happening when you plug it in, this should be the first thing you check. Get everything soldered and heatshrink the wires individually and you are good to go!
     

     
     
    Step 5: Placing the Bluetooth Antenna
    If you have a metal case (and sometimes if you don't) you may find that bluetooth reception is spotty. This can be VERY inconvenient with issues ranging from a jumpy mouse to static from your bluetooth audio feed. Below are some general tips (in particular order) to ensure that you have the best experience possible.
     
    - As mentioned, make sure that you twist the data wires together. This reduces EMI and really does make an incredible difference in certain cases.
    - Use a longer antenna. If you have been inside any mac desktop, you will know that the antennas they use are long, and usually end up (the actually antenna part) somewhere near the outside of the case. This is for a good reason, so check out the original link or search around for the best price on a long antenna cable.
    - When mounting your antenna to your case, make sure the front of the antenna is not the side attached to the case. Preferably use double-sided tape/foam so that the antenna is not touching metal.
    - As far as best positioning, it really depends on your case. There is no formula for this except trial and error.
     
    A useful tip for helping you gauge bluetooth signal:
    There are apps for both iOS and Android that have a built-in bluetooth strength meter. Place your phone/tablet on the table where your mouse would be, and move the bluetooth antenna around the case. It would be a good idea to put the side panel on with each placement to get a more accurate reading. This is how I found out that my signal was better at the back on my case rather than right at the front like I had it initially!
  5. Like
    WhatTheTech reacted to Poco in Permanently Banned From Tonymacx86   
    I think this topic has run its course for the moment. If something significant comes up feel free to ask for this to be reopened/create a new topic - but I think most of what needed to be said has been covered between this thread and our own thoughts.
     
    Time to focus on more important topics
  6. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from mendietinha in When your job hands you a G5...   
    Hey man, good to see you around! Any current projects?
     
     

    Because those were the original disks that came with it! Also because it's kind of like stepping back in time - Panther was the first Apple OS I ever used on a regular basis
  7. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from mendietinha in When your job hands you a G5...   
    ...and says "do whatever you want with it" - it's VERY hard to stay in retirement. Hi to everyone who remembers me! For those who don't, I ran the short-lived G5Modders.com website as well as the soon-to-be-relaunched MacModders.com site! I have backups of the Ultimate G5 Modding thread as well as various other tutorials, guides, builds and whatnot that will be put back online - it's awesome to see people still modding away!
     
    With a 24" iMac and a 15" Macbook Pro from work for home use, as well as a last-gen Mac Pro with a 30" ACD at my desk at work, it was easy to go into a retirement. I had two computers at home, one at work - what else could I want?
     
    Well all that changed when we were clearing out some old junk (I work at a printing company) and came across an old dusty G5 in perfect condition besides a few minor scratches and labels stuck to it. After replacing the hard-drive and RAM...BLAM - up and running, well currently installing OS X Panther. I was told to keep it, since I'm pretty sure it doesn't run the Adobe CC 2014 suite...
     

     
    As much as I love that this is a fully-functional G5, for it to be useful for me, it's going to have to be gutted and replaced with a hackintosh. Besides, what's the fun of having a G5 case without ripping it open??
     
    This will be a slow worklog - I have to pull all of my modding supplies out of storage, choose my parts, order one of TLH's fantastic trays...
     
    Nice to be back, looking forward to seeing some old faces!
  8. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from mendietinha in When your job hands you a G5...   
    ...and says "do whatever you want with it" - it's VERY hard to stay in retirement. Hi to everyone who remembers me! For those who don't, I ran the short-lived G5Modders.com website as well as the soon-to-be-relaunched MacModders.com site! I have backups of the Ultimate G5 Modding thread as well as various other tutorials, guides, builds and whatnot that will be put back online - it's awesome to see people still modding away!
     
    With a 24" iMac and a 15" Macbook Pro from work for home use, as well as a last-gen Mac Pro with a 30" ACD at my desk at work, it was easy to go into a retirement. I had two computers at home, one at work - what else could I want?
     
    Well all that changed when we were clearing out some old junk (I work at a printing company) and came across an old dusty G5 in perfect condition besides a few minor scratches and labels stuck to it. After replacing the hard-drive and RAM...BLAM - up and running, well currently installing OS X Panther. I was told to keep it, since I'm pretty sure it doesn't run the Adobe CC 2014 suite...
     

     
    As much as I love that this is a fully-functional G5, for it to be useful for me, it's going to have to be gutted and replaced with a hackintosh. Besides, what's the fun of having a G5 case without ripping it open??
     
    This will be a slow worklog - I have to pull all of my modding supplies out of storage, choose my parts, order one of TLH's fantastic trays...
     
    Nice to be back, looking forward to seeing some old faces!
  9. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from mendietinha in When your job hands you a G5...   
    ...and says "do whatever you want with it" - it's VERY hard to stay in retirement. Hi to everyone who remembers me! For those who don't, I ran the short-lived G5Modders.com website as well as the soon-to-be-relaunched MacModders.com site! I have backups of the Ultimate G5 Modding thread as well as various other tutorials, guides, builds and whatnot that will be put back online - it's awesome to see people still modding away!
     
    With a 24" iMac and a 15" Macbook Pro from work for home use, as well as a last-gen Mac Pro with a 30" ACD at my desk at work, it was easy to go into a retirement. I had two computers at home, one at work - what else could I want?
     
    Well all that changed when we were clearing out some old junk (I work at a printing company) and came across an old dusty G5 in perfect condition besides a few minor scratches and labels stuck to it. After replacing the hard-drive and RAM...BLAM - up and running, well currently installing OS X Panther. I was told to keep it, since I'm pretty sure it doesn't run the Adobe CC 2014 suite...
     

     
    As much as I love that this is a fully-functional G5, for it to be useful for me, it's going to have to be gutted and replaced with a hackintosh. Besides, what's the fun of having a G5 case without ripping it open??
     
    This will be a slow worklog - I have to pull all of my modding supplies out of storage, choose my parts, order one of TLH's fantastic trays...
     
    Nice to be back, looking forward to seeing some old faces!
  10. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from mendietinha in When your job hands you a G5...   
    ...and says "do whatever you want with it" - it's VERY hard to stay in retirement. Hi to everyone who remembers me! For those who don't, I ran the short-lived G5Modders.com website as well as the soon-to-be-relaunched MacModders.com site! I have backups of the Ultimate G5 Modding thread as well as various other tutorials, guides, builds and whatnot that will be put back online - it's awesome to see people still modding away!
     
    With a 24" iMac and a 15" Macbook Pro from work for home use, as well as a last-gen Mac Pro with a 30" ACD at my desk at work, it was easy to go into a retirement. I had two computers at home, one at work - what else could I want?
     
    Well all that changed when we were clearing out some old junk (I work at a printing company) and came across an old dusty G5 in perfect condition besides a few minor scratches and labels stuck to it. After replacing the hard-drive and RAM...BLAM - up and running, well currently installing OS X Panther. I was told to keep it, since I'm pretty sure it doesn't run the Adobe CC 2014 suite...
     

     
    As much as I love that this is a fully-functional G5, for it to be useful for me, it's going to have to be gutted and replaced with a hackintosh. Besides, what's the fun of having a G5 case without ripping it open??
     
    This will be a slow worklog - I have to pull all of my modding supplies out of storage, choose my parts, order one of TLH's fantastic trays...
     
    Nice to be back, looking forward to seeing some old faces!
  11. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from tonydickinson in OS X compatible motherboard -> QUO   
    Kickstarter is not a presale system, and they don't claim to be. Their goal is simply to provide a platform for promoting a vision, and tracking any subsequent funding of said vision.
     
    They should not be considered a pre-order system, and there are in fact regulations in the United States about making distinctions between a "pre-order" and an "investment". Kickstarter is an investment system, as described in their documentation, but they make the point to mention that they are only allowing for start-up investment with no share/stock returns for any investors.
     
    Just for clarification...
     
     
    No, because they are still in the pre-production stage. I don't know how many finished motherboards Quo has on hand, but I suspect that right now they only have prototype/first run boards for testing purposes. If they're shipping out in June, I can't imagine that they actually have finished motherboards in the quantities needed to ship on a regular basis.
     
    --------------
     
    As a side note, it seems that Tonymac's website has shut down all discussion of this board, and deleted an account associated with Quo. It's pretty hilarious to use the search function on that site - 50% of the things I search for result in a "not found" or "no access to this", even though it will show up in search results. Apparently nobody told them that this was a Gigabyte project...
  12. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from ameris_cyning in [Tutorial] - Hackintosh Bluetooth Module   
    INTRO
    This is about the easiest way of adding bluetooth to your hackintosh. Forget nervously waiting to see if the latest update will knock out your 3rd-party bluetooth, this uses an Apple bluetooth module that will never be phased out (or most likely not)!
     
    Permalink for this tutorial:
    http://www.whatthete...ntoshbluetooth/
     
    Parts Needed:
    Apple Bluetooth Module A1181 ($6 - Make sure you get one with the connector cable!)
    2 x 1N4001 Micro 1A Diodes ($4 for one hundred!)
    iMac Bluetooth Antenna ($7 - Much better reception than the A1118 antenna!)
    A USB Motherboard Header ($1.99)
     
    Tools Needed:
    This is a very easy modification, but you will also need a few tools:
    - Soldering Iron & solder
    - Heat Shrink tubing (1/8" or smaller - electrical tape not recommended for precision work)
    - Sleeving (optional - example)
     
    THE PROCESS:
     
    Step 1: Prepping the USB Cable
    First of all you will want to remove one end of the motherboard header so that just the pins or wires are left, as you can see on the far left of this image:
     

     
    Feel free to just cut one end off and strip down the individual wire casings, ready for soldering.
     
    Note: At this point it is recommend that you twist the data wires together along the entire length of the cable. This helps reduce EMI and should give you a more stable signal overall.
     
     
    Step 1.1: (Optional) Sleeving
    At this point, I would suggest putting the sleeve over your cable because once you've soldered everything it becomes a hassle. Simply slip the sleeving over your cut wires and push it down to the end, as pictured below (as well as one cut of heat shrink to stop that end fraying):
     

     
     
    Step 2: Prepping the Bluetooth Cable
    The USB cable is going to be attached to the cable that came with your Apple bluetooth module (pictured below), so also cut the end that would plug into the Apple motherboard (NOT the bluetooth module end). Take care to leave enough cable for soldering and then some. Mistakes are made, and my first bluetooth was ruined because I didn't leave room for error.
     
    You should be left with this:
     

     
     
    Step 3: The Diodes
    The diodes are important because the bluetooth module will not run on 5V - it needs to be around 3.7V, and may indeed WILL become damaged on regular USB power levels. The two diodes should be soldered into the red power wire nose-to-tail, with the forwards voltage soldered (i.e. going towards the bluetooth module) as shown.
     

     
    Step 4: The Other Wires
    As you can see from the diagram below, the rest of your soldering is quite simple. The black (ground) cables connect directly together, and the Data cables cross over colorswith green USB going to yellow bluetooth, and white USB going to green bluetooth. This is the main cause of non-working mods, so if nothing is happening when you plug it in, this should be the first thing you check. Get everything soldered and heatshrink the wires individually and you are good to go!
     

     
     
    Step 5: Placing the Bluetooth Antenna
    If you have a metal case (and sometimes if you don't) you may find that bluetooth reception is spotty. This can be VERY inconvenient with issues ranging from a jumpy mouse to static from your bluetooth audio feed. Below are some general tips (in particular order) to ensure that you have the best experience possible.
     
    - As mentioned, make sure that you twist the data wires together. This reduces EMI and really does make an incredible difference in certain cases.
    - Use a longer antenna. If you have been inside any mac desktop, you will know that the antennas they use are long, and usually end up (the actually antenna part) somewhere near the outside of the case. This is for a good reason, so check out the original link or search around for the best price on a long antenna cable.
    - When mounting your antenna to your case, make sure the front of the antenna is not the side attached to the case. Preferably use double-sided tape/foam so that the antenna is not touching metal.
    - As far as best positioning, it really depends on your case. There is no formula for this except trial and error.
     
    A useful tip for helping you gauge bluetooth signal:
    There are apps for both iOS and Android that have a built-in bluetooth strength meter. Place your phone/tablet on the table where your mouse would be, and move the bluetooth antenna around the case. It would be a good idea to put the side panel on with each placement to get a more accurate reading. This is how I found out that my signal was better at the back on my case rather than right at the front like I had it initially!
  13. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from willrockhopper in Need Help with G5 Mod (late 2005 model) Front Panel Wiring!   
    Will - you are correct on the single ground! I run the G5 Resource Page at G5Modders.com - would you mind if I add this to the Front Panel informational page? We don't have much about the late '05 G5 but (and you're evidence of this) I know there are people out there that could benefit from your knowledge! Let me know if this diagram worked for you and whether you would be ok with that (you would be credited!)
     
    Thanks!
  14. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from willrockhopper in Need Help with G5 Mod (late 2005 model) Front Panel Wiring!   
    Will - you are correct on the single ground! I run the G5 Resource Page at G5Modders.com - would you mind if I add this to the Front Panel informational page? We don't have much about the late '05 G5 but (and you're evidence of this) I know there are people out there that could benefit from your knowledge! Let me know if this diagram worked for you and whether you would be ok with that (you would be credited!)
     
    Thanks!
  15. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from fantomas in Hackintosh Builds for Every Budget!   
    Definitely cool to see this pop up. I think once it is complete, we should get it up on the news feed - definitely something that will bring in a lot of people via Google.
     
    I say add an x79 - simply because it's still quite a popular platform!
  16. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from tonydickinson in OS X compatible motherboard -> QUO   
    Kickstarter is not a presale system, and they don't claim to be. Their goal is simply to provide a platform for promoting a vision, and tracking any subsequent funding of said vision.
     
    They should not be considered a pre-order system, and there are in fact regulations in the United States about making distinctions between a "pre-order" and an "investment". Kickstarter is an investment system, as described in their documentation, but they make the point to mention that they are only allowing for start-up investment with no share/stock returns for any investors.
     
    Just for clarification...
     
     
    No, because they are still in the pre-production stage. I don't know how many finished motherboards Quo has on hand, but I suspect that right now they only have prototype/first run boards for testing purposes. If they're shipping out in June, I can't imagine that they actually have finished motherboards in the quantities needed to ship on a regular basis.
     
    --------------
     
    As a side note, it seems that Tonymac's website has shut down all discussion of this board, and deleted an account associated with Quo. It's pretty hilarious to use the search function on that site - 50% of the things I search for result in a "not found" or "no access to this", even though it will show up in search results. Apparently nobody told them that this was a Gigabyte project...
  17. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from tonydickinson in OS X compatible motherboard -> QUO   
    From a strictly legal point of view (I spent a year studying business law in the U.K.) what a company mentions in press releases will nearly always ONLY be used against them, and can rarely be used to support them in a legal battle (i.e. "but on our website it says..." doesn't impress judges).
     
    So while saying "any OS" is great marketing (and in my opinion, a noble goal), it has absolutely NO standing in any legal sense unless it is stated officially in company policies. EVEN THEN, any other talk on forums such as this of facilitating people to break a contract with Apple (in this case their EULA) is grounds for legal repercussions at Apple's behest. Cleverly they have not mentioned OSX on their kickstarter project. Less cleverly, they have been open about announcing this project on one of two hackintosh websites that I am sure Apple is aware of (i.e. Insanelymac).
     
    My argument has NOTHING to do with chipsets and everything to do with a company making money by promoting a motherboard compatible with Apple's proprietary software, whether directly or indirectly. Note the key phrase "making money". Rarely will an end-user be sued (although I do have a friend who was on the chopping block during the BitTorrent shake-down), because barr making an example, there are no financial damages to be had. Hacker magazines? Educational. Figuring out how to hack in to your DVR to download recorded shows to your iPod? Questionable, certainly against your TOU, but probably not going to get you into serious trouble. Partnering with a major manufacturer to sell a motherboard that will most likely be purchased to run OSX?
     
    When it comes down to it, a simple question from Apple's lawyers would look something like this (assuming honesty is a given):
     
    Apple: Did you create these motherboards to run OSX?
    Quo: We created them for an end-user to install whatever they wanted on them.
    Apple: At any point did you mention intentional compatibility with OS X?
    Quo: There were some conversations about this on an internet forum, yes.
    Apple: Was this by people employed by or directly associated with Quo computer?
    Quo: Yes.
     
    And that is how you get a strong legal basis for proving that their intent, whether primary or not, was to help users bypass Apple's EULA, something which while not ilegal, certainly is open to legal recourse.
     
    Listen - I'm all for open-source software and the freedom of choice for end-users, HOWEVER, a noble cause does not a lawsuit avoid. I want these guys to succeed. I wish them all the best on their kickstarter project, and am already planning on purchasing a board for my Mac Pro mod. But having open discussions linking your product to breaking Apple's EULA? Very unwise for people connected to the company to be involved.
     
    *Edited for grammatical reasons.*
  18. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from tonydickinson in OS X compatible motherboard -> QUO   
    *Edit* Just realized you're implying that you know it's a Gigabyte, sorry! Comment is now directed at those who didn't know.
     
    It IS a Gigabyte motherboard - or at least it's a side-project that involves them. From the kickstarter page: "The motherboard is created by a very reputable company, Gigabyte USA as an exclusive OEM project."
     
    Honestly this little bit of information worries me. If Apple finds out that a MAJOR manufacturer is involved in the hackintosh scene, they will start doing more to block us out, almost guaranteed. I know that we have some truly talented coders in the community who can pretty much break anything Apple puts out, but it worries me nonetheless. The OSx86 community has survived partly because there have only been a very few number of ventures into commercialization (Psystar etc)...I can't imagine Apple legal overlooking one of the world's leading motherboard manufacturers backing EULA violations.
  19. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from ameris_cyning in [Tutorial] - Hackintosh Bluetooth Module   
    INTRO
    This is about the easiest way of adding bluetooth to your hackintosh. Forget nervously waiting to see if the latest update will knock out your 3rd-party bluetooth, this uses an Apple bluetooth module that will never be phased out (or most likely not)!
     
    Permalink for this tutorial:
    http://www.whatthete...ntoshbluetooth/
     
    Parts Needed:
    Apple Bluetooth Module A1181 ($6 - Make sure you get one with the connector cable!)
    2 x 1N4001 Micro 1A Diodes ($4 for one hundred!)
    iMac Bluetooth Antenna ($7 - Much better reception than the A1118 antenna!)
    A USB Motherboard Header ($1.99)
     
    Tools Needed:
    This is a very easy modification, but you will also need a few tools:
    - Soldering Iron & solder
    - Heat Shrink tubing (1/8" or smaller - electrical tape not recommended for precision work)
    - Sleeving (optional - example)
     
    THE PROCESS:
     
    Step 1: Prepping the USB Cable
    First of all you will want to remove one end of the motherboard header so that just the pins or wires are left, as you can see on the far left of this image:
     

     
    Feel free to just cut one end off and strip down the individual wire casings, ready for soldering.
     
    Note: At this point it is recommend that you twist the data wires together along the entire length of the cable. This helps reduce EMI and should give you a more stable signal overall.
     
     
    Step 1.1: (Optional) Sleeving
    At this point, I would suggest putting the sleeve over your cable because once you've soldered everything it becomes a hassle. Simply slip the sleeving over your cut wires and push it down to the end, as pictured below (as well as one cut of heat shrink to stop that end fraying):
     

     
     
    Step 2: Prepping the Bluetooth Cable
    The USB cable is going to be attached to the cable that came with your Apple bluetooth module (pictured below), so also cut the end that would plug into the Apple motherboard (NOT the bluetooth module end). Take care to leave enough cable for soldering and then some. Mistakes are made, and my first bluetooth was ruined because I didn't leave room for error.
     
    You should be left with this:
     

     
     
    Step 3: The Diodes
    The diodes are important because the bluetooth module will not run on 5V - it needs to be around 3.7V, and may indeed WILL become damaged on regular USB power levels. The two diodes should be soldered into the red power wire nose-to-tail, with the forwards voltage soldered (i.e. going towards the bluetooth module) as shown.
     

     
    Step 4: The Other Wires
    As you can see from the diagram below, the rest of your soldering is quite simple. The black (ground) cables connect directly together, and the Data cables cross over colorswith green USB going to yellow bluetooth, and white USB going to green bluetooth. This is the main cause of non-working mods, so if nothing is happening when you plug it in, this should be the first thing you check. Get everything soldered and heatshrink the wires individually and you are good to go!
     

     
     
    Step 5: Placing the Bluetooth Antenna
    If you have a metal case (and sometimes if you don't) you may find that bluetooth reception is spotty. This can be VERY inconvenient with issues ranging from a jumpy mouse to static from your bluetooth audio feed. Below are some general tips (in particular order) to ensure that you have the best experience possible.
     
    - As mentioned, make sure that you twist the data wires together. This reduces EMI and really does make an incredible difference in certain cases.
    - Use a longer antenna. If you have been inside any mac desktop, you will know that the antennas they use are long, and usually end up (the actually antenna part) somewhere near the outside of the case. This is for a good reason, so check out the original link or search around for the best price on a long antenna cable.
    - When mounting your antenna to your case, make sure the front of the antenna is not the side attached to the case. Preferably use double-sided tape/foam so that the antenna is not touching metal.
    - As far as best positioning, it really depends on your case. There is no formula for this except trial and error.
     
    A useful tip for helping you gauge bluetooth signal:
    There are apps for both iOS and Android that have a built-in bluetooth strength meter. Place your phone/tablet on the table where your mouse would be, and move the bluetooth antenna around the case. It would be a good idea to put the side panel on with each placement to get a more accurate reading. This is how I found out that my signal was better at the back on my case rather than right at the front like I had it initially!
  20. Like
    WhatTheTech reacted to ameris_cyning in Great quote about Zimmerman trial   
    Taken from Fark.com:
     
     
     
  21. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from TechnoGranny in Dreaming big...   
    "Do you have any [expletive] idea what it's like to be me?", Steve Jobs once angrily retorted to someone. Actually, lately I have a pretty good idea. There's no way that I can quantify any of this blog post to strangers without spending a few hours hanging out, so let's just assume I'm not a self-involved toolbox and keep going shall we?
     
    Steve has been heralded as many things over the decades, some say "visionary", others "innovator", but I believe first and foremost that the main thing that Steve offered to the people around him, was his skills as a facilitator. How do I know? Because Steve and I are very alike. Before I go on, let's dissect my statement some. If we're being totally honest, the only vision Steve had was directly related not to seeing the future of brilliant products, but in fact was more founded upon his criticism of current products. Don't believe me? Go read the official biography. The iPhone wasn't created because he sat their dreaming of a touch-screen, app-filled world, but simply because (in his own words) most phones "were pretty {censored}". Likewise much of his drive for creating good computers was found in criticizing the creations of others. There's nothing inherently wrong in this, I'm just pointing it out as an important factor in understanding the true nature of his genius. As far as an innovator? Well, he did introduce some innovative products, but by and large his name is on patents no more prominently than any of the other people he worked with. Innovation rarely comes from one person alone, especially in the technological industry. Without relying too heavily on semantics to back my statement up, I'll just say that Steve was the head of a team of innovators (Apple), and while we can say he left a legacy of innovation, that doesn't mean that this word sums him up fundamentally as an individual I don't say any of this to disparage his memory or in some way lessen what he did, because as I'm about to explain, I don't think that facilitating is any less honorable than being a visionary, or an innovator.
     
    No, Steve was definitely first and foremost a facilitator. He empowered the people around him to do great things. What if Steve Jobs wasn't around when a younger Jony Ive was working on strange-looking computer models in one of Apple's design studios? Steve himself was looking outside the company for industrial designers, and just happened upon Sir Ive's work one day. Another CEO might have passed on by, perhaps complained that the designers already working for Apple were terrible, but not Jobs. He saw potential, and he facilitated. Sure, there would be months of trashing small "errors" that others wouldn't even see, hours of shouting about corrections not made, and near breakdowns when the prototype didn't have the slot-load DVD drive hours before unveiling, but the iMac finally arrived and changed the look of desktops forever. How many other corporate CEOs can you see saying "yes" when Ive said (paraphrased) "Well, you do know that this thing is going to be see-through, right?" It makes you wonder - how many other incredible designers are sitting out there, working on mind-blowing clay models and yet, at the end of the day, they either take them home hoping one day someone will see the brilliance in what they do or else they dejectedly drop them in the trash...
     
    I see true vision in Jony Ives - creating something brilliant out of a pile of clay on his desk. THAT is vision. Innovation? The multi-touch technology from Fingerworks that Apple (led by Jobs) purchased in 2005. But facilitating? Nobody has even facilitated like Steve. Nobody has ever provided avenues for success of the people around him like he did.
     
    Sometimes I feel as though I'm full of great ideas for other people. I don't have programming skills, but I can give you three great ideas right now that would be open-source hits. I don't have great prototyping skills, but I have two products in mind that would make someone $50,000 in a year, easily. I also have an idea for a website that I believe could rival some of the big ones, but again, simply don't have the skills or initial capital to make it happen (note: not all great websites require start-up capital, but done right this one does). Why am I telling you this? Well mostly because I'm frustrated and need an outlet, but also to leave some encouragement. In my first draft of this blog post I made the comment "who's going to entrust an exciting idea to a college dropout", and then realized the irony of that statement. I know there are other dreamers/facilitators on this website - the OSx86 community naturally pulls them in (along with the hackers, tinkerers and other creatives). If you're reading..."bon courage" as they say in France. Don't lose that spark, that excitement you get about working with people and working with big ideas. You are the ones who drive innovation, and the world needs you. As for me? I'll be sitting in my home office, pretending to edit pictures for people, while I dream of one day seeing the people around me being free to bringing their innovation and vision to the public eye. Though Steve probably didn't say it often, there's no prouder moment for a facilitator than seeing the collaborative dreams of his or her team come to life and be successful...
  22. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from Alessandro17 in Apple finally announces all-new Mac Pro   
    Personally the design doesn't bother me - sure it looks a little bit like a trash can and it's black instead of the silver we all love, but I know tons of creative professionals who will be pleased at the space-saving design.
     
    I think getting rid of the DVD drive is a mistake - not a HUGE one, but enough to inconvenience users. I thought I was done with DVDs until I started editing video more - though many professionals share work in the cloud now, most CLIENTS are still going to want a DVD copy of the work they pay for. I still get funny looks when I hand over wedding photos to clients on a USB drive, let alone video work. Now if Apple offers a CHEAP DVD add-on (hell, it should be free) that could sit under the new Mac Pro and fit seamlessly, that's a little bit different, but looking at the bottom of the new MP I think it would destabilize it some.
     
    The hardware, on the other hand, seems to be aimed at maximizing profit over convenience. While this is in line with Apple's M.O., at least older MP have some level of user-based upgradeability.
     
    In regards to the thunderbolt complaints, we should keep in mind that it's still a very new technology (using the term "new" to indicate level of implementation, not in temporal terms). Even USB 3.0 cables and peripherals were considerably more expensive than they are now - as more people switch over the price will drop. No, it's not fun for those wanting to make the switch to TB now, but it's not exactly a phenomenon that is unique to Apple.
     
    Really it doesn't matter what I think - I'll be buying  one of these in 2018 when they are cheap on the used market. Until then, it's hackintosh parts in an old Mac Pro case for me!
  23. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from Alessandro17 in Apple finally announces all-new Mac Pro   
    Personally the design doesn't bother me - sure it looks a little bit like a trash can and it's black instead of the silver we all love, but I know tons of creative professionals who will be pleased at the space-saving design.
     
    I think getting rid of the DVD drive is a mistake - not a HUGE one, but enough to inconvenience users. I thought I was done with DVDs until I started editing video more - though many professionals share work in the cloud now, most CLIENTS are still going to want a DVD copy of the work they pay for. I still get funny looks when I hand over wedding photos to clients on a USB drive, let alone video work. Now if Apple offers a CHEAP DVD add-on (hell, it should be free) that could sit under the new Mac Pro and fit seamlessly, that's a little bit different, but looking at the bottom of the new MP I think it would destabilize it some.
     
    The hardware, on the other hand, seems to be aimed at maximizing profit over convenience. While this is in line with Apple's M.O., at least older MP have some level of user-based upgradeability.
     
    In regards to the thunderbolt complaints, we should keep in mind that it's still a very new technology (using the term "new" to indicate level of implementation, not in temporal terms). Even USB 3.0 cables and peripherals were considerably more expensive than they are now - as more people switch over the price will drop. No, it's not fun for those wanting to make the switch to TB now, but it's not exactly a phenomenon that is unique to Apple.
     
    Really it doesn't matter what I think - I'll be buying  one of these in 2018 when they are cheap on the used market. Until then, it's hackintosh parts in an old Mac Pro case for me!
  24. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from Alessandro17 in Apple finally announces all-new Mac Pro   
    Personally the design doesn't bother me - sure it looks a little bit like a trash can and it's black instead of the silver we all love, but I know tons of creative professionals who will be pleased at the space-saving design.
     
    I think getting rid of the DVD drive is a mistake - not a HUGE one, but enough to inconvenience users. I thought I was done with DVDs until I started editing video more - though many professionals share work in the cloud now, most CLIENTS are still going to want a DVD copy of the work they pay for. I still get funny looks when I hand over wedding photos to clients on a USB drive, let alone video work. Now if Apple offers a CHEAP DVD add-on (hell, it should be free) that could sit under the new Mac Pro and fit seamlessly, that's a little bit different, but looking at the bottom of the new MP I think it would destabilize it some.
     
    The hardware, on the other hand, seems to be aimed at maximizing profit over convenience. While this is in line with Apple's M.O., at least older MP have some level of user-based upgradeability.
     
    In regards to the thunderbolt complaints, we should keep in mind that it's still a very new technology (using the term "new" to indicate level of implementation, not in temporal terms). Even USB 3.0 cables and peripherals were considerably more expensive than they are now - as more people switch over the price will drop. No, it's not fun for those wanting to make the switch to TB now, but it's not exactly a phenomenon that is unique to Apple.
     
    Really it doesn't matter what I think - I'll be buying  one of these in 2018 when they are cheap on the used market. Until then, it's hackintosh parts in an old Mac Pro case for me!
  25. Like
    WhatTheTech got a reaction from Alessandro17 in Apple finally announces all-new Mac Pro   
    Personally the design doesn't bother me - sure it looks a little bit like a trash can and it's black instead of the silver we all love, but I know tons of creative professionals who will be pleased at the space-saving design.
     
    I think getting rid of the DVD drive is a mistake - not a HUGE one, but enough to inconvenience users. I thought I was done with DVDs until I started editing video more - though many professionals share work in the cloud now, most CLIENTS are still going to want a DVD copy of the work they pay for. I still get funny looks when I hand over wedding photos to clients on a USB drive, let alone video work. Now if Apple offers a CHEAP DVD add-on (hell, it should be free) that could sit under the new Mac Pro and fit seamlessly, that's a little bit different, but looking at the bottom of the new MP I think it would destabilize it some.
     
    The hardware, on the other hand, seems to be aimed at maximizing profit over convenience. While this is in line with Apple's M.O., at least older MP have some level of user-based upgradeability.
     
    In regards to the thunderbolt complaints, we should keep in mind that it's still a very new technology (using the term "new" to indicate level of implementation, not in temporal terms). Even USB 3.0 cables and peripherals were considerably more expensive than they are now - as more people switch over the price will drop. No, it's not fun for those wanting to make the switch to TB now, but it's not exactly a phenomenon that is unique to Apple.
     
    Really it doesn't matter what I think - I'll be buying  one of these in 2018 when they are cheap on the used market. Until then, it's hackintosh parts in an old Mac Pro case for me!
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