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3.14r2

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  1. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from René_ in [How-To] Apple wired aluminum keyboard disassembly   
    Hi there!
    I have the above keyboard. Unfortunately it has "died" together with USB connector in my notebook (a short circuit as far as I can tell). The USB connector was an easy thing to fix (had a spare dead motherboard from the same notebook). However things are much more complicated with the Apple keyboard.
     
    So here I have a dead expensive keyboard that is not designed to be disassembled and repaired (at least so it seem judging from how it's made). As I can't (ATM) afford to buy a replacement (even used ones are quite expensive), the only thing left was to repair it. As usual Google is my friend. Found this page:
    http://www.brunerd.c...43-disassembly/
     
    Opened the keyboard and found that the controller PCB is toasted. While the donor keyboard bought for parts (sold as faulty with "only few keys not working") had the PCB working, at the same time it was also not 100% OK. About 6 keys are not responding (no, not the F* keys)...
     
    So her is an instruction how I did the disassembly (with many pics ). Maybe someone might find this information useful/entertaining.
     
    Tools needed:
    A putty knife
    A Philips screwdriver #1
    A solder aid tool (Spudger)
    A soldering iron (optional; needed if you want to remove the USB cable/wire)
     
    Precautions:
    DON NOT USE PUTTY KNIFE IN THE AREA SHOW HERE!!!

    This area contains PCB and a thin film with traces. These things are easy to damage!
    Be careful handling putty knife - it's sharp.
    Be gentle but firm, as plastic things tend to brake then a brute force is applied.
     
    The first step is to find the point where the plastic bottom part may be lift slightly to insert a putty knife. Most likely it would be either in the middle (just near the text), or in left/right corner. Then the weak spot is located, insert a putty knife there and push it inside the keyboard tilting the knife left to right (or right to left if you like). Like this:
    1.

    2.

    The first things to separate, are the side parts (near the two USB connectors).
    3.

    4.

    Then this step is complete, the rest should come off with less resistance.
    Using the same method proceed along the perimeter of your keyboard. Again there is no need to rush. Eventually you should reach the point when a putty knife would reach the PCB area. At this point, the top and the bottom parts can not yet be separated completely.
    5.

    Be careful, as these two parts are connected together. Just open it like a book. If all went well you should get this:
    6.

    or this:
    7.

    The difference is where a reinforcement steel plate (the grey area in both pics) is located. It may stick to the bottom plastic part or to the metal backplate of keys. I guess it depends on which adhesive layer is weaker (as the reinforcement steel plate has adhesive layers on both sides).
     
    Now it's time to remove the PCB. Take a screwdriver and unscrew these four Philips screws
    8.

    Then lift the USB connector side of the board sliding it towards center of the keyboard.
    9.

    Repeat for both USB connectors. The PCB should now be off the bottom plastic part.
    After you are done with screws and PCB, take a Spudger and disconnect the conductive film ends by releasing the two ZIF (zero insertion force) connectors
    10.

    11.

    Now remove the plastic part preventing the USB wire (the one that is connected to a computer) and unsolder it from the PCB
    12.

    Note that this wire is also held in place by a dent in the metal inserted in the bottom plastic casing and is also wrapped in to EMI protection foil attached to reinforcement steel plate.
    That's all for now.
     
    Part two
     
    Now it's time to remove keys.
     
    Have your Spudger handy and insert it between the key you want to remove and the aluminium chassis, then lift the key.
    13.

    Then push the Spudger under the key cap until the key cap comes off.
    14.

    There is a difference where to insert the Spudger. It should be inserted like this:
    14a.

    Not like this:
    14b.

    That is it should be inserted between the key cap and the clip axis. Otherwise the cap won't come off easily. Note that different keys have key clips oriented differently. have this in mind then removing other keys not shown here.
     
    To remove a plastic clips that holds key caps, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis (in the upper left/right corner) and push the clip upwards. It should click and come off. Then slide the Spudger under the plastic clip towards the other end of the clip. It should click and come off completely.
    15.

    16.

    That's all!
    17.

     
    Unfortunately there are 7 different types of key cap clips used in the keyboard. These 7 types can be divided in two groups. The difference is how the clip is attached to the metal frame. The clip shown above is used most.
     
    Now I'll show how to remove the other group of a clips. The difference is minor though.
     
    To remove the plastic clips that holds the key cap, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis and turn the Spudger towards the key clip to release the pin holding it in place. It should click and come off completely.
    18.

    19.

     
    Part three
     
    Now it's time to remove the base plate with conductive layers. This part can take 4 or more hours to do, so think twice if you really need this
     
    The base plate is welded/soldered to the front chassis/bezel. In order to separate these parts, all (much more then 50) welding/soldering points should be separated. It can be done either with thin drill/Dremel or using a flat 2mm screwdriver.
     
    Using a flat screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer.
    20.

    Then try pushing the base plate from inside (that is insert your finger to a empty hole where keys were and push the base plate upwards). It may come off, but most likely it will not. Therefore, using the same screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    21.

    The above is valid for all the joints within the inner part of the base plate. There are also joint along the perimeter of the base. These joint seem to be less resistance. These could be removed by using the same screwdriver and scrubbing off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    22.

    Some of the joints are covered by a thin layer of clear film. This is needed to isolate the metal base from PCB placed right under it.
    23.

    This can be left in place as it's easy to make holes in it and it doesn't aggravate the process at all.
     
    After all the joints were removed, the back plate should come off with ease. It consists of 3 conductive film layers and the metal base to which key clips are attached. All the film layers are joined glued together with rather weak adhesive, therefore can be easily separated. These layers are (from top to bottom):
    Layer with clear silicon springs (some call this thing a nipple). These layer is aimed to return the key cap in the up most position after it's been pressed. This layer also push the contacts in the layers down under it, those a key press is registered by the controller and sent to a computer.
    The upper layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).
    The bottom layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).

    24.

    All the parts with front bezel removed look like this:
    25.

    The bezel itself (wiev from inside)
    26.

    Back plate with bezel
    27.

    All the three layer separated
    28.

    There are four layer seen in the pic above. The two layer on the right are actually the same layer (e.g. the protective film was removed by accident). You should not do so, or the traces most likely be damaged beyond repair.
    29.

    Here we have a Caps Lock LED and its cover.
    30.

     
    Thanks for watching!
    THE END
  2. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Micky1979 in Apple's WWDC 2016 runs June 13-17   
    If they reintroduce a 17" MacBook (Pro ?) can I be a possible buyer
  3. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Nevo in 24 SSD RAID   
    Old video but clearly proof somebody was under the influence... The way he handled those drives, what he did with them and finally to post a video online boosting about it... Man on man so many things were done wrong!
  4. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from Roamaz in 24 SSD RAID   
  5. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from René_ in [How-To] Apple wired aluminum keyboard disassembly   
    Hi there!
    I have the above keyboard. Unfortunately it has "died" together with USB connector in my notebook (a short circuit as far as I can tell). The USB connector was an easy thing to fix (had a spare dead motherboard from the same notebook). However things are much more complicated with the Apple keyboard.
     
    So here I have a dead expensive keyboard that is not designed to be disassembled and repaired (at least so it seem judging from how it's made). As I can't (ATM) afford to buy a replacement (even used ones are quite expensive), the only thing left was to repair it. As usual Google is my friend. Found this page:
    http://www.brunerd.c...43-disassembly/
     
    Opened the keyboard and found that the controller PCB is toasted. While the donor keyboard bought for parts (sold as faulty with "only few keys not working") had the PCB working, at the same time it was also not 100% OK. About 6 keys are not responding (no, not the F* keys)...
     
    So her is an instruction how I did the disassembly (with many pics ). Maybe someone might find this information useful/entertaining.
     
    Tools needed:
    A putty knife
    A Philips screwdriver #1
    A solder aid tool (Spudger)
    A soldering iron (optional; needed if you want to remove the USB cable/wire)
     
    Precautions:
    DON NOT USE PUTTY KNIFE IN THE AREA SHOW HERE!!!

    This area contains PCB and a thin film with traces. These things are easy to damage!
    Be careful handling putty knife - it's sharp.
    Be gentle but firm, as plastic things tend to brake then a brute force is applied.
     
    The first step is to find the point where the plastic bottom part may be lift slightly to insert a putty knife. Most likely it would be either in the middle (just near the text), or in left/right corner. Then the weak spot is located, insert a putty knife there and push it inside the keyboard tilting the knife left to right (or right to left if you like). Like this:
    1.

    2.

    The first things to separate, are the side parts (near the two USB connectors).
    3.

    4.

    Then this step is complete, the rest should come off with less resistance.
    Using the same method proceed along the perimeter of your keyboard. Again there is no need to rush. Eventually you should reach the point when a putty knife would reach the PCB area. At this point, the top and the bottom parts can not yet be separated completely.
    5.

    Be careful, as these two parts are connected together. Just open it like a book. If all went well you should get this:
    6.

    or this:
    7.

    The difference is where a reinforcement steel plate (the grey area in both pics) is located. It may stick to the bottom plastic part or to the metal backplate of keys. I guess it depends on which adhesive layer is weaker (as the reinforcement steel plate has adhesive layers on both sides).
     
    Now it's time to remove the PCB. Take a screwdriver and unscrew these four Philips screws
    8.

    Then lift the USB connector side of the board sliding it towards center of the keyboard.
    9.

    Repeat for both USB connectors. The PCB should now be off the bottom plastic part.
    After you are done with screws and PCB, take a Spudger and disconnect the conductive film ends by releasing the two ZIF (zero insertion force) connectors
    10.

    11.

    Now remove the plastic part preventing the USB wire (the one that is connected to a computer) and unsolder it from the PCB
    12.

    Note that this wire is also held in place by a dent in the metal inserted in the bottom plastic casing and is also wrapped in to EMI protection foil attached to reinforcement steel plate.
    That's all for now.
     
    Part two
     
    Now it's time to remove keys.
     
    Have your Spudger handy and insert it between the key you want to remove and the aluminium chassis, then lift the key.
    13.

    Then push the Spudger under the key cap until the key cap comes off.
    14.

    There is a difference where to insert the Spudger. It should be inserted like this:
    14a.

    Not like this:
    14b.

    That is it should be inserted between the key cap and the clip axis. Otherwise the cap won't come off easily. Note that different keys have key clips oriented differently. have this in mind then removing other keys not shown here.
     
    To remove a plastic clips that holds key caps, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis (in the upper left/right corner) and push the clip upwards. It should click and come off. Then slide the Spudger under the plastic clip towards the other end of the clip. It should click and come off completely.
    15.

    16.

    That's all!
    17.

     
    Unfortunately there are 7 different types of key cap clips used in the keyboard. These 7 types can be divided in two groups. The difference is how the clip is attached to the metal frame. The clip shown above is used most.
     
    Now I'll show how to remove the other group of a clips. The difference is minor though.
     
    To remove the plastic clips that holds the key cap, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis and turn the Spudger towards the key clip to release the pin holding it in place. It should click and come off completely.
    18.

    19.

     
    Part three
     
    Now it's time to remove the base plate with conductive layers. This part can take 4 or more hours to do, so think twice if you really need this
     
    The base plate is welded/soldered to the front chassis/bezel. In order to separate these parts, all (much more then 50) welding/soldering points should be separated. It can be done either with thin drill/Dremel or using a flat 2mm screwdriver.
     
    Using a flat screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer.
    20.

    Then try pushing the base plate from inside (that is insert your finger to a empty hole where keys were and push the base plate upwards). It may come off, but most likely it will not. Therefore, using the same screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    21.

    The above is valid for all the joints within the inner part of the base plate. There are also joint along the perimeter of the base. These joint seem to be less resistance. These could be removed by using the same screwdriver and scrubbing off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    22.

    Some of the joints are covered by a thin layer of clear film. This is needed to isolate the metal base from PCB placed right under it.
    23.

    This can be left in place as it's easy to make holes in it and it doesn't aggravate the process at all.
     
    After all the joints were removed, the back plate should come off with ease. It consists of 3 conductive film layers and the metal base to which key clips are attached. All the film layers are joined glued together with rather weak adhesive, therefore can be easily separated. These layers are (from top to bottom):
    Layer with clear silicon springs (some call this thing a nipple). These layer is aimed to return the key cap in the up most position after it's been pressed. This layer also push the contacts in the layers down under it, those a key press is registered by the controller and sent to a computer.
    The upper layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).
    The bottom layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).

    24.

    All the parts with front bezel removed look like this:
    25.

    The bezel itself (wiev from inside)
    26.

    Back plate with bezel
    27.

    All the three layer separated
    28.

    There are four layer seen in the pic above. The two layer on the right are actually the same layer (e.g. the protective film was removed by accident). You should not do so, or the traces most likely be damaged beyond repair.
    29.

    Here we have a Caps Lock LED and its cover.
    30.

     
    Thanks for watching!
    THE END
  6. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from JahStories in New MacBook (retina 2015) data recovery issue   
    You are welcome!
     
    Looks like there aren't many articles (as of today) on the net describing the new RMB specifically from this standpoint (i.e. data recovery in the case of a dead logic board). Even iFixit in their RMB tear down don't mention this fact (most likely they didn't consider this particular problem then describing the all new SSD). I've lost all my date few times (and finally learned the lesson) and ability to recover data is of great importance to me (I guess not only me). Hence potential buyers of RMB should be aware that there is an inherent danger lurking inside the product and THEY MUST back up their data regularly.
     
    Apple could actually implement some sort of "you MUST backup your data" solution on the RMBs. Or they could face yet another s..t storm (just like the infamous iphone 6 error 53).
     
    And yes, I know several people still using the white polycarbonate MB
  7. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from JahStories in New MacBook (retina 2015) data recovery issue   
    Hi all,
     
    Found this YT video and want to share:

     
    It's about attempts to discover ways how to extract/recover data from the new Retina MacBooks.
     
    The main problem (as I see it) is that on the new MacBooks an SSD itself is SOLDERED DIRECTLY to the logic board (just like the RAM and CPU) and it is not in any shape or form removable like for instance a HDD (the older MacBooks/MacBooks Pro) or a proprietary Apple's SSD module that is attached to the logic board via a socket (thus can be removed/replaced). So you can not remove this SSD and put it to a different Mac/external enclosure.
     
    Hence in a case of a major logic board failure (say a liquid spill) with the MacBook not even turning on as a result, a user (without a backup in hand) is faced with a very probable lose of ALL data on the SSD. Unless the logic board is repaired (which is not always possible, not to mention that Apple doesn't do that and you need to find a repair shop that do these kind of repairs).
     
    Sure it might probably be possible (in theory at least) to desolder the NAND chips together with the controller chips (which in turn are Apple's own development and good luck finding any datasheets on them) and solder them back on to a working logic board. Question is is it really possible and how much such a data recovery would cost (knowing that data recovery from the good old HDDs usually cost an arm and a leg).
     
    Not to mention the single (!) I/O port used for everything (except the headphones maybe)...
     
    Apple really went to town to make the data recovery from a dead retina MB's almost impossible (I doubt it was intentional rather it's a result of cutting costs/thickness of the product).
     
    Think twice about that before you buy the RMB!
  8. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from JahStories in New MacBook (retina 2015) data recovery issue   
    Hi all,
     
    Found this YT video and want to share:

     
    It's about attempts to discover ways how to extract/recover data from the new Retina MacBooks.
     
    The main problem (as I see it) is that on the new MacBooks an SSD itself is SOLDERED DIRECTLY to the logic board (just like the RAM and CPU) and it is not in any shape or form removable like for instance a HDD (the older MacBooks/MacBooks Pro) or a proprietary Apple's SSD module that is attached to the logic board via a socket (thus can be removed/replaced). So you can not remove this SSD and put it to a different Mac/external enclosure.
     
    Hence in a case of a major logic board failure (say a liquid spill) with the MacBook not even turning on as a result, a user (without a backup in hand) is faced with a very probable lose of ALL data on the SSD. Unless the logic board is repaired (which is not always possible, not to mention that Apple doesn't do that and you need to find a repair shop that do these kind of repairs).
     
    Sure it might probably be possible (in theory at least) to desolder the NAND chips together with the controller chips (which in turn are Apple's own development and good luck finding any datasheets on them) and solder them back on to a working logic board. Question is is it really possible and how much such a data recovery would cost (knowing that data recovery from the good old HDDs usually cost an arm and a leg).
     
    Not to mention the single (!) I/O port used for everything (except the headphones maybe)...
     
    Apple really went to town to make the data recovery from a dead retina MB's almost impossible (I doubt it was intentional rather it's a result of cutting costs/thickness of the product).
     
    Think twice about that before you buy the RMB!
  9. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to frankiee in Old Mac Pro (and any decent hack I guess) blows new Mac "Pro" out of the water   
    I know what you mean, but on the other hand the 2010 models overall achitecture is way older than the new one. And apparently it can still keep up! Also do not forget that it is impossible to run the nMP at full load for a longer time (ie. GPU + CPU at 100%) due to thermal and power limits. Still think that the nMP is what other Apple products are more and more, and that is "function follows form". Lets face it, Apple is no longer a company who makes computers for professionals, they have become a gadget company. And I fear that OS X (the sole reason I am still on this platform!) will suffer even more, which would be very sad imho.
     
    PS: and the nMP has two GPUs while the others were run with one if I read that right ...
  10. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Alessandro17 in Where Do I start?   
    Windows 10 is still very unstable, thus for any serious work I'd use Windows 7 or 8
  11. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from GAD555 in А нужна ли нам русская ветка?   
    Трудно не согласится! Замкнутый круг однако:
    не приходят потому, что нет инфы на Русском
    инфы нет потому, что не задают вопросы на Русском (нет вопросов, нет ответов)
    ну и по новой...
    Возможно вопросы бы появились, если было побольше инфы на Русском, но по факту её нет и не факт что появление оной радикально поменяет ситуацию.
     
    Это вопрос не ко мне Я с разным сталкивался в жизни, вот и предположил, могу и ошибаться конечно. Просто предположение без каких либо задних мыслей.
     
    По наблюдениям есть, только многие соблюдая конспирацию общаются на Английском. Сама ветка вроде никому не мешает, так пускай себе и дальше никому не мешает...
  12. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to MARKBOARD NETSET in Petition: Release Mac OS X for PC   
    NO I don't  agree your petition is aberration ! 
     
    We here are to hack OS X to run on PCs for the sake of our personal use only. That's it and That's all !
  13. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from wegface in MacOS X vs Linux   
    AFAIK in enterprise market companies pay for the support of Linux products (not for the Linux itself which is still free even at enterprise level). SUSE enterprise version for instance. So i guess developers do care if a product is user-friendly, only when money are involved.
  14. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from cuthead in MacOS X vs Linux   
    No, it's not. Linux and OS X use quite different approach to hardware management. Linux/Unix drivers (the source code) are useful to understand how the device work and should be handled. With this info a skilled programmer(s) can create OS X driver. AFAIK creating a properly working driver from scratch, is the upper level of programming skills.
  15. Like
  16. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Poco in Permanently Banned From Tonymacx86   
    I think this topic has run its course for the moment. If something significant comes up feel free to ask for this to be reopened/create a new topic - but I think most of what needed to be said has been covered between this thread and our own thoughts.
     
    Time to focus on more important topics
  17. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Alessandro17 in MacOS X vs Linux   
    What you often hear from people (and I don't mean Joe User) who have moved to OS X is that its desktop is absolutely great.
    Who could deny that?
    KDE 4xx, Gnome 3, Unity, which kind of {censored} is that? One day arrogant Linux developers lost their mind and decided that decent, perfectly usable desktop environments like KDE 3.5 or Gnome 2 were no longer good. I don't mean that there shouldn't be any innovation, but not wild experimentation for the sake of it, even when so many of your users are screaming that you are going down the wrong path.
    Fortunately some devs were sane enough to realize that something needed to be done and began to create decent DEs again, like Mate or Cinammon.
    KDE 4 is a lost cause. The best which can be done is to customize it so that it looks and behaves more like old KDE 3.5. This has been done mainly by the Mandriva family of derivatives.
  18. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Slice in куда делся applelife.ru   
    Да там беспрестанно что-то случается. Уже не удивляюсь.
  19. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to fakea648 in Apple redesigns OS X.   
    The same thing they have against desktop operating systems. Microsoft did it with windows 8, and now apple is doing it too. Trying to turn a PROVEN desktop OS into some lame tablet/phone hybrid interface that will ALWAYS feel foreign on the desktop no matter what, is like trying to unite quantum theory with general relativity.. I can only hope they find out the hard way and take a step back like Microsoft did with windows 8; Apple is so damn obsessed with bastardizing OS X into iOS, can you imagine OS X dumbed down to the level iOS is? Simplicity should not come at such a huge cost, they need to not neglect their power users.
     
    Don't you miss the timeframe around when Snow Leopard was being released? It was all about Grand Central, OpenCL, many actual benefits and improvements targeted to the DESKTOP operating system. Now it's just all about what they took from ios and put it "back to the mac."
     
    This is a big {censored} box, there is a mouse and a keyboard, and even a network cable for internet! Hell there is even a power cord, can you believe it? I don't want to pretend its a phone, I don't want to see a phone-like user interface that is made for a 5 inch screen. Is that asking for too much? 
     
    OS X is the only apple product i use, because I genuinely LOVE it. Having said that, there's not a thing in this world that I loathe more than iOS
  20. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Alessandro17 in Parted Magic 6.4 released   
    Once again I was right (I wish I weren't actually). Since it became paid there haven't been any new releases (once Parted Magic used to release very often) and it is going into oblivion, at last judging by DistroWatch Page Hit Ranking: No. 92!!!
     
    R.I.P. Parted Magic. We will miss you, but OTOH there are many other great Linux LiveCDs/DVDs
  21. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to XLR in OS X 10.10 Yosemite unveiled   
    Looks like a blatant Win8 ripoff, makes me think about quitting computers leaving society and moving to a deserted island.
  22. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from René_ in [How-To] Apple wired aluminum keyboard disassembly   
    Hi there!
    I have the above keyboard. Unfortunately it has "died" together with USB connector in my notebook (a short circuit as far as I can tell). The USB connector was an easy thing to fix (had a spare dead motherboard from the same notebook). However things are much more complicated with the Apple keyboard.
     
    So here I have a dead expensive keyboard that is not designed to be disassembled and repaired (at least so it seem judging from how it's made). As I can't (ATM) afford to buy a replacement (even used ones are quite expensive), the only thing left was to repair it. As usual Google is my friend. Found this page:
    http://www.brunerd.c...43-disassembly/
     
    Opened the keyboard and found that the controller PCB is toasted. While the donor keyboard bought for parts (sold as faulty with "only few keys not working") had the PCB working, at the same time it was also not 100% OK. About 6 keys are not responding (no, not the F* keys)...
     
    So her is an instruction how I did the disassembly (with many pics ). Maybe someone might find this information useful/entertaining.
     
    Tools needed:
    A putty knife
    A Philips screwdriver #1
    A solder aid tool (Spudger)
    A soldering iron (optional; needed if you want to remove the USB cable/wire)
     
    Precautions:
    DON NOT USE PUTTY KNIFE IN THE AREA SHOW HERE!!!

    This area contains PCB and a thin film with traces. These things are easy to damage!
    Be careful handling putty knife - it's sharp.
    Be gentle but firm, as plastic things tend to brake then a brute force is applied.
     
    The first step is to find the point where the plastic bottom part may be lift slightly to insert a putty knife. Most likely it would be either in the middle (just near the text), or in left/right corner. Then the weak spot is located, insert a putty knife there and push it inside the keyboard tilting the knife left to right (or right to left if you like). Like this:
    1.

    2.

    The first things to separate, are the side parts (near the two USB connectors).
    3.

    4.

    Then this step is complete, the rest should come off with less resistance.
    Using the same method proceed along the perimeter of your keyboard. Again there is no need to rush. Eventually you should reach the point when a putty knife would reach the PCB area. At this point, the top and the bottom parts can not yet be separated completely.
    5.

    Be careful, as these two parts are connected together. Just open it like a book. If all went well you should get this:
    6.

    or this:
    7.

    The difference is where a reinforcement steel plate (the grey area in both pics) is located. It may stick to the bottom plastic part or to the metal backplate of keys. I guess it depends on which adhesive layer is weaker (as the reinforcement steel plate has adhesive layers on both sides).
     
    Now it's time to remove the PCB. Take a screwdriver and unscrew these four Philips screws
    8.

    Then lift the USB connector side of the board sliding it towards center of the keyboard.
    9.

    Repeat for both USB connectors. The PCB should now be off the bottom plastic part.
    After you are done with screws and PCB, take a Spudger and disconnect the conductive film ends by releasing the two ZIF (zero insertion force) connectors
    10.

    11.

    Now remove the plastic part preventing the USB wire (the one that is connected to a computer) and unsolder it from the PCB
    12.

    Note that this wire is also held in place by a dent in the metal inserted in the bottom plastic casing and is also wrapped in to EMI protection foil attached to reinforcement steel plate.
    That's all for now.
     
    Part two
     
    Now it's time to remove keys.
     
    Have your Spudger handy and insert it between the key you want to remove and the aluminium chassis, then lift the key.
    13.

    Then push the Spudger under the key cap until the key cap comes off.
    14.

    There is a difference where to insert the Spudger. It should be inserted like this:
    14a.

    Not like this:
    14b.

    That is it should be inserted between the key cap and the clip axis. Otherwise the cap won't come off easily. Note that different keys have key clips oriented differently. have this in mind then removing other keys not shown here.
     
    To remove a plastic clips that holds key caps, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis (in the upper left/right corner) and push the clip upwards. It should click and come off. Then slide the Spudger under the plastic clip towards the other end of the clip. It should click and come off completely.
    15.

    16.

    That's all!
    17.

     
    Unfortunately there are 7 different types of key cap clips used in the keyboard. These 7 types can be divided in two groups. The difference is how the clip is attached to the metal frame. The clip shown above is used most.
     
    Now I'll show how to remove the other group of a clips. The difference is minor though.
     
    To remove the plastic clips that holds the key cap, insert Spudger between the clip you want to remove and the aluminium chassis and turn the Spudger towards the key clip to release the pin holding it in place. It should click and come off completely.
    18.

    19.

     
    Part three
     
    Now it's time to remove the base plate with conductive layers. This part can take 4 or more hours to do, so think twice if you really need this
     
    The base plate is welded/soldered to the front chassis/bezel. In order to separate these parts, all (much more then 50) welding/soldering points should be separated. It can be done either with thin drill/Dremel or using a flat 2mm screwdriver.
     
    Using a flat screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer.
    20.

    Then try pushing the base plate from inside (that is insert your finger to a empty hole where keys were and push the base plate upwards). It may come off, but most likely it will not. Therefore, using the same screwdriver, scrub off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    21.

    The above is valid for all the joints within the inner part of the base plate. There are also joint along the perimeter of the base. These joint seem to be less resistance. These could be removed by using the same screwdriver and scrubbing off the solder layer twisting the screwdriver back and forth at the same time applying slight pressure.
    22.

    Some of the joints are covered by a thin layer of clear film. This is needed to isolate the metal base from PCB placed right under it.
    23.

    This can be left in place as it's easy to make holes in it and it doesn't aggravate the process at all.
     
    After all the joints were removed, the back plate should come off with ease. It consists of 3 conductive film layers and the metal base to which key clips are attached. All the film layers are joined glued together with rather weak adhesive, therefore can be easily separated. These layers are (from top to bottom):
    Layer with clear silicon springs (some call this thing a nipple). These layer is aimed to return the key cap in the up most position after it's been pressed. This layer also push the contacts in the layers down under it, those a key press is registered by the controller and sent to a computer.
    The upper layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).
    The bottom layer with traces (insulated with a layer of thin clear film).

    24.

    All the parts with front bezel removed look like this:
    25.

    The bezel itself (wiev from inside)
    26.

    Back plate with bezel
    27.

    All the three layer separated
    28.

    There are four layer seen in the pic above. The two layer on the right are actually the same layer (e.g. the protective film was removed by accident). You should not do so, or the traces most likely be damaged beyond repair.
    29.

    Here we have a Caps Lock LED and its cover.
    30.

     
    Thanks for watching!
    THE END
  23. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to theconnactic in Brand-new 2013 Mac Pro 6,1!   
    About extreme daisy-chaining with the nMP: http://www.macworld.com/article/2146360/lab-tested-the-mac-pro-daisy-chain-challenge.html
  24. Like
    3.14r2 reacted to Gringo Vermelho in Petition: Release Mac OS X for PC   
    I don't have to think again, it's quite obvious why they will never do that.
     
    OS X is free now. They are giving it away. But Apple wouldn't want to support the near-infinite number of possible PC hardware configurations...for free.
     
    Anyone running OS X on a PC is not entitled to support of any kind. We can't ask Apple for anything and we're lucky that it works at all.
     
    Many of us enter into their ecosystem, ie, pay for apps from the app store, pay for stuff on iTunes. Apple benefits from this. We're their consumers, but we have no rights, we can't complain and we can't ask for support.
     
    Your internet browser shows what OS you're running. So, on the internet, all of us appear as if we were using a Mac. This looks great in the statistics and it doesn't cost Apple a single dime.
     
    If I was running a business, that would be my favorite kind of consumer.
     
  25. Like
    3.14r2 got a reaction from lemarqq in Hidpi Mode / resolution   
    The key thing with super high resolution, is to have more pixels per square space of a display. In other words the smaller the pixels are, the more details can be reproduced and picture would look more "crisp". Just compare two displays of the same size (say 17" notebook) but with different resolution (say 1600x900 VS 1920x1080). The screen size (dimensions) is the same but image would look quite differently.
     
    Bottom line, buy smaller display with higher resolution. IMO
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