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Mr. Bond

Retired
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About Mr. Bond

  • Rank
    The man with the golden gun.

Contact Methods

  • MSN
    mrbond@osx86project.org
  • Website URL
    http://

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Canada
  1. Kernel panics: because of 4gb RAM?

    Intel boards like that (in adition to certain nForce boards like my own) are known to have issues with 4gb of RAM. Leopard is a x64 OS - the problem lies in the kernel being used, I believe. 4gb of RAM caused the worst stability issues, particularly with transmission, as you noted. Dropping to 3gb made things a little better, but I would still panic during intensive activities. I believe 2gb is what'll work best for you (as it does for me, at the moment). The kernel flag is "maxmem=2048" or whatever value you'd like.
  2. Judging by the fact that you can't even spell his name correctly... Cut it out with the spamming, or you'll find yourself with a nice, shiny temp ban.
  3. Ultimate fix for the Time issue...

    If I don't prefer to fix it from the Windows side, what can I do in OS X then? Some sort of terminal/plist fix? I ask only becuase I primarily use OS X, while the rest of the family mainly uses Vista. Plus, there has to be a better way to achieve the same thing in windows. Wouldn't syncing both OS's to the internet achieve the same thing?
  4. *Bond organizes a hostile takeover of Netkas...muahahaha* I'm assuming they still haven't gotten back to you, Netkas? Also, have you tried their number, which apparently works now?
  5. Is that a known issue insomnimac with OS X in general, or simply Hackintoshes? I've heard that a couple times...and I have been getting freezes as well. Hrm. Also, for all those who are either rebooting/freezing/panicing right after the Darwin bootloader - remember, you may need to specify a specific kernel at boot for your system! The list is at the beginning of the thread....so if you're having issues, identify your system specs, and see if any of the aforementioned kernels work/apply to you!
  6. From Atom to Apple

    Thanks for the nice comments guys! Hopefully I'll get the chance to write some more articles now and then. mfker's right - while ARM is an architecture, they are the company responsible for designing the architecture, which they then license out. As someone pointed out, the XScale was Intel's attempt to license such technology, in an attempt to beat ARM at their own game. Of course, such an attempt ultimately failed, which is why most of the XScale brand/chipset now resides with Marvell. It seems to me that Atom is Intel's chance to rebound, and refocus on their x86 roadmap. Also, I find it incredibly unlikely any of this will be found in an iPhone 2 - not only was this tech only recently announced, but I take it 2nd gen iPhone work has been going on for quite a few months now. Seeing as it's most likely just a 3G update, I doubt we'd be seeing a massive architecture change just yet - it would create an incredibly uneeded hassle, especially with regards to SDK/app compatibility. I see this more as something that could be incorporated in future devices. While in this article I focused on Atom's embedded chips, I didn't really touch upon the Centrino versions which were announced as well. These are more the type of chips that would be found in low-end laptops and UMPC's, and seeing as Apple already uses the Intel architecture in their desktop/portable products, it would seem that the likelihood of finding the Atom in a Macbook Air/AppleTV device is a big possibility as well. Come to think of it, it would be interesting to see whether the use of an Atom-type chipset could drive a product like the Air into a more consumer-friendly price range for an ultra-portable.
  7. Forums slow the last few days

    Yeah, things are definetly back up to speed. It was near unbearable these last couple days. Hats of to you, Suhail!
  8. It’s no secret why Apple decided to utilize ARM processor technology in both its wildly successful iPhone and iPod Touch. Besides being one of the most cost-effective of today’s embedded chipsets, the ability to run at higher clock speeds without sacrificing power consumption was clearly an attractive feature, considering Apple’s needs . But not to be outdone, it seems Intel is banking on its newly introduced line of Atom embedded processors, not only to meet, but exceed such crucial features in the mobile computing world. Of course, what does such a move mean for Apple? It’s clear that Apple wants to push the boundaries of how and where media can travel, evident through such consumer brands as iTunes and the AppleTV. The ability to acquire, transfer and experience media as fluidly and seamlessly as possible appears to be one of Apple’s major focuses - and the framework is already in place today. The newly enhanced iTunes store, when fully mature, should continue to offer a one of the easiest multimedia experiences available. Apple hardware, meanwhile, continues to demonstrate a degree of coherence and compatibility almost unheard of from any other company. One of Atom’s prime focuses is on what Intel refers to as the mobile internet devices, or MIDs – smaller than UMPCs, but still delivering the same rich multimedia and internet-driven experiences consumers have grown accustomed to. It’s not hard to see that Apple shares some of these same goals – the iPhone’s Safari, for example, has set the bar for the mobile browsing experience, allowing users to experience media online – on-the-go – in previously unheard of ways. Such similar focuses make it only natural to wonder – what could Apple do with such a platform? While the Atom’s size may be a little on the large side for the traditional mobile phone, it could prove to be a powerful asset for future unconventional devices, similar in nature to the iPhone. Much like its ARM rivals, the Atom chipset claims aim to offer superior clock speeds at but a fraction of the energy consumption. This is crucial, particularly when used in mobile phones and other devices. A generous 1GB of ram is the chipset’s limit, while WiFi, Bluetooth and even WiMax round out Intel’s networking options. Also unique is Intel’s dedicated video decoding hardware; while Apple already employs such technology in everything from it’s iPods to iPhones, what makes Intel’s offering unique is its capability to decode both 720p and 1080i HD video. One can only imagine how well such an implementation would work with its iTunes online store – especially with Apple’s recent foray into HD content distribution. Still, one of the most attractive reasons for employing the Atom chipset would be Apple’s return to an x86 platform. Currently, Apple’s OS X is being developed for three distinct architectures – x86, PPC and now ARM, for both the iPhone and iPod Touch. Reducing the number of architectures to two (and eventually one, with PPC’s inevitable demise), would not only free up time and money, but reduce the risk of diluting OS X’s core development. Also interesting is Intel’s decision to make its Atom processors compatible with its Core 2 Duo instruction set – complete with technologies like hyper-threading and SSE3. Such capabilities would not only make modifying existing OS X code a simpler affair, but optimization as well. It will be interesting to see what the future holds, not only for Intel’s Atom platform, but the entire MID market. Apple’s no stranger to architecture switches, and it definitely seems that - on the surface, at least - Intel has an offering that will be sure to compete with some of ARM’s most successful chipsets. Yet, only time will tell whether such technologies will find their ways into the hands of consumers – perhaps even in the form of another Apple device.
  9. From Atom to Apple

    It’s no secret why Apple decided to utilize ARM processor technology in both its wildly successful iPhone and iPod Touch. Besides being one of the most cost-effective of today’s embedded chipsets, the ability to run at higher clock speeds without sacrificing power consumption was clearly an attractive feature, considering Apple’s needs . But not to be outdone, it seems Intel is banking on its newly introduced line of Atom embedded processors, not only to meet, but exceed such crucial features in the mobile computing world. Of course, what does such a move mean for Apple? It’s clear that Apple wants to push the boundaries of how and where media can travel, evident through such consumer brands as iTunes and the AppleTV. The ability to acquire, transfer and experience media as fluidly and seamlessly as possible appears to be one of Apple’s major focuses - and the framework is already in place today. The newly enhanced iTunes store, when fully mature, should continue to offer a one of the easiest multimedia experiences available. Apple hardware, meanwhile, continues to demonstrate a degree of coherence and compatibility almost unheard of from any other company. One of Atom’s prime focuses is on what Intel refers to as the mobile internet devices, or MIDs – smaller than UMPCs, but still delivering the same rich multimedia and internet-driven experiences consumers have grown accustomed to. It’s not hard to see that Apple shares some of these same goals – the iPhone’s Safari, for example, has set the bar for the mobile browsing experience, allowing users to experience media online – on-the-go – in previously unheard of ways. Such similar focuses make it only natural to wonder – what could Apple do with such a platform? While the Atom’s size may be a little on the large side for the traditional mobile phone, it could prove to be a powerful asset for future unconventional devices, similar in nature to the iPhone. Much like its ARM rivals, the Atom chipset claims aim to offer superior clock speeds at but a fraction of the energy consumption. This is crucial, particularly when used in mobile phones and other devices. A generous 1GB of ram is the chipset’s limit, while WiFi, Bluetooth and even WiMax round out Intel’s networking options. Also unique is Intel’s dedicated video decoding hardware; while Apple already employs such technology in everything from it’s iPods to iPhones, what makes Intel’s offering unique is its capability to decode both 720p and 1080i HD video. One can only imagine how well such an implementation would work with its iTunes online store – especially with Apple’s recent foray into HD content distribution. Still, one of the most attractive reasons for employing the Atom chipset would be Apple’s return to an x86 platform. Currently, Apple’s OS X is being developed for three distinct architectures – x86, PPC and now ARM, for both the iPhone and iPod Touch. Reducing the number of architectures to two (and eventually one, with PPC’s inevitable demise), would not only free up time and money, but reduce the risk of diluting OS X’s core development. Also interesting is Intel’s decision to make its Atom processors compatible with its Core 2 Duo instruction set – complete with technologies like hyper-threading and SSE3. Such capabilities would not only make modifying existing OS X code a simpler affair, but optimization as well. It will be interesting to see what the future holds, not only for Intel’s Atom platform, but the entire MID market. Apple’s no stranger to architecture switches, and it definitely seems that - on the surface, at least - Intel has an offering that will be sure to compete with some of ARM’s most successful chipsets. Yet, only time will tell whether such technologies will find their ways into the hands of consumers – perhaps even in the form of another Apple device.
  10. Teaching an OS X86 class this Friday

    That's quite interesting, actually, and commendable that you were able to explain and accomplish as much as you did. Getting over the notion that OS X *can* be run on a PC is half the battle; the amount of puzzled looks I get from people when they see it on my laptop gets to be ever so frustrating after a while. There's only so many times I can reiterate that it's neither a skin, nor emulated. From what I recall, the TPM was only used in the original dev kits, from way back when. So you've all pretty much covered that already. Just curious, but did you get on the topic of customization/hardware tailoring, or even building your own DVD's?
  11. Demonoid Back Online!

    Just because the content you've acquired appears legit doesn't mean it may not be part of a larger sting operation - if anything, it would be to their advantage to instill the notion that legit content equals safe content. Personally, it seems a little farfetched, but stranger things have happened. Also, I noticed that Canadian users are allowed back on; I still would like to know what happened with regards to that whole episode. :s
  12. another mac hater site

    Bahaha....look at the bottom of the statistics page. Apparently we've referred over a 160 people to his site. And remember, Maddox = satire. Satire can be humourous, and a way to poke fun at topics others would normally take seriously. So no need to take anything he says personally.
  13. Mac OS X 10.5.1 Almost Ready

    I'm assuming that's a hackintosh issue, though? Because a 10.5.1 update really won't fix those issues. It's more of a powermanagement issue with kexts/your hardware.
  14. Hmm...I need to get something straight here. Is the original kext posted on the first page supposed to support UDMA and all that for PATA drives? Because the drive I have in now is *terribly* slow. And I honestly can't figure out why....I've tried quite a few different versions of that kext, and they either break, or simply worsen my problems. Are there known issues with PATA drives or anything like that? I'd just like to get things useable, at least, to tide me over till SATA becomes a reality. =/
  15. Mac OS X 10.5.1 Almost Ready

    In all honesty, I see no issue with having a lot more frequent, regular updates, even if it is shortly after release. While I understand Vista has LiveUpdate, the hotfixes that are pushed really don't adress many of the main bugs and issues like the incremental updates that Apple releases. In other words, frequent updates are a lot better than being dumped with a service pack every year or two.
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