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Swad

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  1. Like
    Swad got a reaction from Akowoista in Important! How to use The Marketplace!   
    So you want to buy/sell/trade something here in The Marketplace? Great! Here are a few guidelines to follow...

    - Start the title of you thread with one of the following tags:

    [Deal] = You've found an amazing deal to share (We really like these!)
    [sell] = Something you're selling
    [buy] = Something you want to buy
    [Trade] = Something you want to trade
    [eBay] = Item for sale by author or found on eBay
    [Hire] = You want to hire someone to do some work (note: paid support is not in the spirit of the OSx86 project and will be removed)

    - Be very clear about what you're selling. This means including all the important information, pictures, etc.

    - If you're interested in buying something, PM the seller. Don't post "I want this!!!" in the thread. Just PM the seller.

    - After an item is sold, the seller must make a note of it in the actual thread with a big SOLD marking in the thread. PM a mod to have them add it to the thread title.

    - That's it! The OSx86 Project just provides this forum as a means for you to sell or get cool Mac stuff. We are not in charge of sales, and we can't ensure the safety of your purchase. If there is a problem with a sale, let us know and we'll see what we can do. If we catch you selling things without actually sending them (or buying without paying), disciplinary actions will be taken. We don't anticipate this happening, though, so just use common sense and you'll be fine!

    -Mashugly
    Last updated 02/08/06
  2. Sad
    Swad got a reaction from ritaPi in OS X Annoyances   
    Just for the record, this isn't a thread for wishing OS X was like Windows - a lot of these annoyances are legitimate things within OS X.
  3. Haha
    Swad got a reaction from CraigFrume in Pestering driver writers & hackers   
    Developers keep this forum moving. Without them, nothing would get done. They have real lives and don't owe us anything. We can appreciate their efforts but bugging them gets us no where.
     
    So here's what we're going to do. Starting today, any thread that even seems remotely antagonistic to developers will be locked immediately (or deleted depending on its content).
     
    Any post that does not offer constructive information on the drivers - that means any posts that makes opinions about what the developer should or should not do - will simple be deleted. We're here as a technical forum, not one where we critique and bother people. Troubleshooting and helping with the drivers are encouraged; whining and making the dev angry is not.
     
    Finally, if it comes to my attention that you have been hassling any developer via PMs or any other method, you will be suspended. End of story.
     
    Why are we taking these measures? Because great assets like JaS and Omni will be lost if you keep up what you've been doing. We've already lost a few devs this way. It won't happen anymore. Period.
     
    We've got some great plans to help devs out in the very near future. They are the lifeblood of this forum and I will not allow 1% of you to ruin it for the rest.
  4. Like
    Swad got a reaction from cuthead in Forum Rules. Read. Then Post.   
    RULES FOR POSTING:
     
    FLAMING
    1) Just don't do it. We'll edit the posts, so no one will see it anyway. Don't waste your time and ours.
     
    2) There will be NO discrimination on this board be it through gender, race, or creed. If you violate this one, you're IMMEDIATELY banned. No questions asked.
     
    BANNING
    It's a 3-strikes-and-you're-out policy. This means 3 warnings and then you're banned.
     
    *Depending on the severity of the offense, we reserve the right to immediately ban you without warning.
     
    A ban includes your IP and host name being banned from the board, and in extreme circumstances, your ISP will be traced and consulted.
     
    WAREZ AND DMCA POLICY
    Anyone who violates this policy or replies to someone who has requested, posting a link in the reply, will be warned. Depending on how many people try this in conjunction with each other, you may be banned immediately, so... don't press your luck.
     
    1) No posting of direct links to warez or pirated pieces of software. We do not support the pirating of software.
     
    2) Torrent files are not allowed, nor are links to torrents.
     
    3) Open source (like Darwin) drivers and kexts are allowed, but OS X files are not, due to copyright.
     
    4) No discussion on how to break the TPM. It's ok to talk about the TPM and cracks that you may find, but telling someone how to do it is wrong.
     
    These rules cover a broad spectrum. They, in conjunction with common sense and good judgement, should steer you in the right direction. We're all human and we know that people make mistakes... don't take that for granted. More rules are subject to appear on this board as we see fit, so please check back from time to time for your own benefit. Ignorance of the rules is no excuse.
  5. Like
    Swad got a reaction from Mr. Xtreme in Patent Madness   
    United States Patent 6,960,976
     
    Related patent for a 1-jigawatt "Flux Capacitor."
     

  6. Like
    Swad got a reaction from wegface in How do you say the "X" in OS X?   
    Smirk on, my friend.
     
    Smirk on.
  7. Like
    Swad got a reaction from Alessandro17 in How do you say the "X" in OS X?   
    I guess I just feel cooler saying "X" - that's what I'm sticking with!
  8. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  9. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  10. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  11. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  12. Like
    Swad got a reaction from wegface in How do you say the "X" in OS X?   
    Smirk on, my friend.
     
    Smirk on.
  13. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  14. Like
    Swad got a reaction from Dud3m@n in Let us know what you're working on!   
    We've had a lot of people that have been working on the same project, but ended up working alone since they didn't know anyone else was interested.
     
    If you're working on a project, tell us about it here. If you want to start working on the project together, start a new thread in this forum!
  15. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  16. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  17. Like
    Swad got a reaction from TimeWalker75a in Longhorn/Vista? XP Warmed Over?   
    Yeah, you're right about the RC thing. I mistyped.
     
    Anyway, yeah all the reviews that I read said the WinHEC version sucked.
     
    And why have they taken out all the good stuff, as in the new filesystem, etc?
  18. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  19. Like
    Swad got a reaction from TimeWalker75a in Longhorn/Vista? XP Warmed Over?   
    Yeah, you're right about the RC thing. I mistyped.
     
    Anyway, yeah all the reviews that I read said the WinHEC version sucked.
     
    And why have they taken out all the good stuff, as in the new filesystem, etc?
  20. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  21. Like
    Swad got a reaction from WaldMeister in Software Piracy   
    I have yet to meet an individual who has actually purchased Adobe Photoshop. Why is that?
     
    Today's Great Debate focuses on the question of software piracy in all its various forms. Is it wrong? Is it analogous to stealing physical goods?
     
    Many people claim that piracy is acceptable and, in some cases, ethical. I know of one Mac developer who has frequently been accused of stealing from open source projects. Is it ethical to steal from an (alleged) thief? What about Microsoft? Why is it that so few people buy copies of Windows? Is it a problem with the user or the product?
     
    Others claim that software piracy is just like any other forms of stealing - it's theft. Those who shoplift are the same as those who take from the latest Serial Box. Is stealing 1's and 0's the same as stealing a physical product? How does piracy affect developers?
     
    Some don't even think about it any more. For them, piracy is the only way to get software.
     
    What say you?
  22. Like
    Swad got a reaction from WaldMeister in Software Piracy   
    I have yet to meet an individual who has actually purchased Adobe Photoshop. Why is that?
     
    Today's Great Debate focuses on the question of software piracy in all its various forms. Is it wrong? Is it analogous to stealing physical goods?
     
    Many people claim that piracy is acceptable and, in some cases, ethical. I know of one Mac developer who has frequently been accused of stealing from open source projects. Is it ethical to steal from an (alleged) thief? What about Microsoft? Why is it that so few people buy copies of Windows? Is it a problem with the user or the product?
     
    Others claim that software piracy is just like any other forms of stealing - it's theft. Those who shoplift are the same as those who take from the latest Serial Box. Is stealing 1's and 0's the same as stealing a physical product? How does piracy affect developers?
     
    Some don't even think about it any more. For them, piracy is the only way to get software.
     
    What say you?
  23. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  24. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

  25. Like
    Swad got a reaction from iLeopod in A History of OSx86 – Part I   
    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley
     
    A History of OSx86 - Part I
    A New Hope.
     
    I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it.
     
    For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking."
     
    But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great!
     
    As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins.
     
    Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try.
     
    A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org.
     
    By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began.
     
    In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86.
     
    It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86.
     
    About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon.
     
    On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time:


    We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens...
     
    UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-)
    As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked.
     
    One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents.
     
    The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC.
     
    Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
     

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