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Swad

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Everything posted by Swad

  1. What blogs do you check out on a regular basis? I've got well over 100 in my blogroll... To see most of mine, check out http://www.bloglines.com/public/Mashugly Let me know if there are any that I'm missing!
  2. Swad

    Most addictive Mac games

    What are those games that you just spend way too much time on? For me: iConquer Chess
  3. It's time that we had a thread for you to let us know the Windows apps that you think are essential! My list: Firefox and Opera I feel like you should have both. Opera is my main browser and use FF for a few other things. Irfanview This is the quickest image editing program I've seen - it's free, fast, and good for those times when photoshop is too much. Flashget Best downloading app ever. Trillian Until we get a Windows port of Adium, this is the IM client to go with uTorrent I switched from Azureus and have been very impressed. Small footprint. SysSense If you check your adsense totals a lot like I tend to do, this app sits in the taskbar and updates itself automatically. Very handy. (Google Ads are the only thing keeping this up, so it's always nice to know how much is in the bank) NetStumbler For finding free wifi. Pixie A great little app that tells you the color codes of whatever you mouseover. FlashFXP The best FTP app I've seen for Windows.
  4. If you're dual booting or triple booting OS X with Windows and/or Linux, let us know in this thread how you did it! Once the Intel Macs come out, a lot of people will be wanting to know how to dual boot OS X. For more Dual Boot guides, check out our wiki. Share your experience here.
  5. This article marks the beginning of a new series we’re starting for the community - The Great Debates. Every few weeks we’ll ask a poignant question regarding some controversal or important topic affecting Mac users. We really want to involve the entire Mac community in these discussions... not just our forum members. So invite your friends. Think of it like a pick-up game of basketball that’s open to everyone but just happens to be hosted on our court. (We're opening up the discussions to non-forum members to contribute as long as the ability isn't abused!) We’re kicking it off with one of those frequent existential crises for most advanced computer users. What Mac internet browser is the greatest? The choice is made a little simpler in Windows - one of the biggest choices, IE, is automatically out of the running, leaving most geeks to choose between Firefox and Opera. The situation gets stickier with the move to a Mac. Not only do you have Firefox and Opera (and IE, that monstrosity), but a host of other choices, not the least of which is the standard OS X browser, Safari. So what is your browser of choice and why? Which is the best and which should reign supreme? Is it important that some browsers need plug-ins or extensions to match the functionality of others? And what about the all important open source factor? What factors are you still looking for in a browser? What say you?
  6. So last night I got to see a good band called Sanctus Real play on stage - great band that was fairly good, but not great, with a live performance. So who's the best band you've ever seen perform live? Why was it so good? I'm curious to see what people thinks makes up a great live performance.
  7. While Apple is way ahead of Windows in many ways, Macs certainly aren't known for their gaming abilities. What does Apple need to do to make the Mac gamin experience better? What specific steps should they take before you'll be taking a Mac to a LAN party?
  8. Swad

    Your Greatest Photos

    Upload your greatest photos and tell us about them! Mine at the moment... The Louvre, Paris Konica Dimage Z1 Auto Settings I'll add more when I get the chance. Show us yours!
  9. A little history... In high school we did a production of the play M*A*S*H* and I was the character "Ugly." Mashugly was the full handle until a few months ago, when I decided that since so many people just call me "Mash", I'd just drop the ugly part off. How about yours?
  10. What applications do you use to get that custom OS X look? Here are a few to get started: ShapeShifter CandyBar These are a few that I've used in the past. What are your favorites?
  11. Swad

    OS X Annoyances

    Today's Great Debate is really more of a venting session. The only real debate is whether these are bugs or features. If one of our annoyances is easily fixed, let us know! What are the things about OS X that annoy you the most? You know, those seemingly tiny little quirks that really get bothersome after awhile. My 3 largest are fairly common. First, I have no idea why there's no default list view in the finder. Should I really have to change the settings for each folder? Secondly, the Dashboard is a powerful tool, but why can't I drag a widget to the desktop (this is, at least, possible) and make it float, stay below other windows, keep it locked on the desktop, etc. (If Apple was trying to knock out Konfabulator with Dashboard - and they were - they should at least support a few of its features) Finally, why can't I delete messages in Mail.app that are below the one selected? Does the rest of the world start at the bottom of their inbox and move up? What are yours?
  12. A thread for you to share with us the music you think we should be listening to. Feel free to post as often as you'd like! Top of my list of music for friends right now: MuteMath - Mute Math You have probably never heard of these guys, but they're one of the best sleeper albums of the year. Great prog and experimental rock. Keane - Under the Iron Sea Not as good as their first album, and a little less accessible initially, but easy to get into after several listens. Chris Thile - Not All Who Wander Are Lost Great contemporary bluegrass album from a member of Nickel Creek (another great group).
  13. A thread for you to share with us the movies you think we should be watching. Feel free to post as often as you'd like! While college doesn't allow me to watch as many new films as I'd like, here's a list of classics: Citizen Kane Probably the greatest movie ever. Don't miss it. It's a Wonderful Life Ok, so they show it every Christmas, but if you actually sit down and watch it (sans commercials), it'll really get to you. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington Another classic Capra film.
  14. I read something the other day that told the correct way to say OS "X," but I think it's wrong. Do you say it as "X" or "10?"
  15. Steve Jobs ; the name has become synonymous with the company he leads. Journalists frequently ask "What will Steve Jobs do next?" as if he is the sole owner, developer, tester, screamer, and thinker at Apple. It's undeniable that Steve is the force behind Apple's success over recent years. But this Great Debate asks - is he what's best for the company going into 2007? The most common pro-Steve argument is that Apple would be nowhere without Steve's resuscitation of the company as iCEO and CEO. His ideas, his attention to detail, his eye for good design ; all of these have been incorporated into Apple's ethos and have propelled the company from rags to riches. Apple's future is very bright, and Steve's leadership has contributed greatly to that future; indeed, it might have been the only thing that gave Apple a future. But has Steve overstayed his welcome? Perhaps taking a cue from his arch-rival Bill Gates, is it time for Steve to step down and let his company proceed without him? The question is not without merit. Folklore.org is chocked full of situations in which Steve held up development for trivial aesthetic concerns, among others. Today's technology landscape is also vastly different than that in 1984 or even the mid-90's when he regained the reigns. Can a habitually proprietary Apple (a philosophy very much influenced by His Steveness) thrive in an increasingly open-source world? Will consumers continue to suffer with 1st Generation products with a history of poor performance? His company has reached the ripe old age of 30 and shows no signs of slowing. Will Steve Jobs be the factor the holds Apple back?
  16. First, big thanks to everyone who's been working on this stuff recently - as someone who was around in the early days, it's so exciting to see how far things have come. I'm installing El Capitan on my new ThinkServer w/ Xeon E3-1225V3, 8GB RAM, Model 70A4001MUX It boots and installs just fine with the USB - the graphics are choppy, but otherwise it's good. It just won't boot on its own. I've tried installing Clover using the quick installer linked in the homepage instructions, as well as the Sourceforge installer, but with no luck - it just hangs on the following screen. I also tried all the variations of OSXAptioFixDrv but none worked (It's an AMI Aptio board) (I can't thank P1lgrim enough for his guide; I followed it to the letter.) I'm attaching screenshots of where it gets stuck and my current Clover settings. Thanks in advance for your help!
  17. Swad

    Best Photography Links

    What are your favorite photography sites? Share them with us here!
  18. We've had a lot of people that have been working on the same project, but ended up working alone since they didn't know anyone else was interested. If you're working on a project, tell us about it here. If you want to start working on the project together, start a new thread in this forum!
  19. I thought I would begin a thread devoted to compiling resources for those working on porting their software. Apple's Developer Transition Resource Center An in-depth look at how Solid Works is making the transition Xcode 2.1 Xcode 2.1 User guide For motivation... Steve's WWDC Keynote If you come across any more resources, post them here!
  20. Swad

    Software Piracy

    I have yet to meet an individual who has actually purchased Adobe Photoshop. Why is that? Today's Great Debate focuses on the question of software piracy in all its various forms. Is it wrong? Is it analogous to stealing physical goods? Many people claim that piracy is acceptable and, in some cases, ethical. I know of one Mac developer who has frequently been accused of stealing from open source projects. Is it ethical to steal from an (alleged) thief? What about Microsoft? Why is it that so few people buy copies of Windows? Is it a problem with the user or the product? Others claim that software piracy is just like any other forms of stealing - it's theft. Those who shoplift are the same as those who take from the latest Serial Box. Is stealing 1's and 0's the same as stealing a physical product? How does piracy affect developers? Some don't even think about it any more. For them, piracy is the only way to get software. What say you?
  21. Swad

    A History of OSx86 – Part I

    Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley A History of OSx86 - Part I A New Hope. I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it. For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking." But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great! As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins. Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try. A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org. By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began. In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86. It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86. About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon. On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time: We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens... UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-) As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked. One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents. The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC. Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
  22. Author's Note: This is the beginning of a 3 part series I'm writing that chronicles the origins of this site and the simultaneous rise of OSx86. In keeping with our community spirit, I'd love to read your early experiences with OSx86 as well... just jump right in this thread. Thanks, and enjoy. - Jason Swadley A History of OSx86 - Part I A New Hope. I consider myself the quintessential 'switcher.' My journey to OS X began with an early frustration with Windows, a new iPod, and an infatuation with gorgeous Macs. I came to the Macintosh by way of a little thing that came to be known as OSx86, and its story is one of intrigue and hacking the likes of which hadn't been seen since the beginning of the PC age. This is the tale of how OS X came to the PC and, in doing so, changed computing history. I didn't sleep much in those days - and I've slept a lot since then - but I humbly present a chronicle of the story as I recall it. For me, OSx86 began in June of 2005. Rolling out of bed on the 6th, I plopped down at my PC to get my morning tech news fix. The top story: Steve Jobs (a name I vaguely knew) had just announced that the entire line of Macintosh computers would be transitioning from PowerPC processors to those made by Intel. At first I was shocked. A year or so before, I had done some searching on installing OS X on PCs. I loved the Dock and couldn’t find a suitable replacement for Windows at the time. I quickly discovered that the main roadblock to running OS X on a generic PC was the different processor architecture, which wasn't changing anytime soon. I forgot the idea and filed it away under "Wishful Thinking." But then came June. That morning I was reminded of my earlier question - why can't I install OS X on my PC? If the answer had been processor architecture, and that architecture was changing, surely we would soon be able to buy OS X for PCs! Wouldn’t that be great! As the summer listlessly passed, however, it became clear that Apple had no intention of selling OS X for my Dell. Those long hot days of June also revealed a large interest among geeks in having Aqua on a generic PC. Blogs everywhere were wondering if a leaked version of the Intel developer build could be run on a PC. Several posted rumors about leaked developer disks from WWDC. This is where my story begins. Although I consider myself quite competent with computers, I'm certainly not a hacker. I was curious about OS X since it offered the stability of Unix without having to learn command line. That June no one knew anything - whether a disk would be installable on any PC, whether it would be traceable to a specific developer who leaked it, or how Apple would manage the transition. All we knew was that we wanted to get our hands on it to try. A random blog comment mentioned that a leaked x86 installation disk had been posted to Demonoid. Although the comments on Demonoid proved the first archive was a hoax, links in the comments sent me to a site linking to a site that linked me to the IRC channel of osbetaarchive.org. By this time there were a number of nicknames floating around for the Intel version of OSx86, with none gaining universal usage. Some called it "mactel," others "macintel" or "OSx86," a combination of OS X and the x86 processors on which it would now run. The IRC gang began calling it OSx86, which didn't have the "hacking" connotation it does today. Since this was my only real interest on IRC, and since the folks in the main osbetaarchive channel had other things they wanted to talk about, I launched #osx86 for discussion solely about the new Intel OS X. I had no idea where "/join #osx86" would take me. This is where The OSx86 Project, and then InsanelyMac, began. In July of 2005, an archive was posted onto Demonoid called "mactel.tar" that supposedly contained files smuggled off an Intel developer machine (DevKit or DTK in the lingo of those first few months) at WWDC. The excitement was palpable. The numbers in the IRC channel swelled as several developers and hackers began to dissect the "mactel" files. While incomplete for a pure installation, several folks began working on combining those files with files from a stock Darwin installation in order to get a working copy of OSx86. It was becoming clear that IRC was not the best medium for the discussion of everything we were learning about OS X for Intel - there were no archives, communication had to be in real time, and longer-term conversations were very difficult. After discussing the matter with a friend named Shuddertrix, I realized that we needed a wiki for folks to post their knowledge and other interesting information. We set up the wiki at osx86.classicbeta.com and it quickly became the central repository for all information relating to OSx86. About this time, the devs working on the mactel.tar files made an interesting discovery – the Intel version of OS X routed many important Rosetta system calls through a Trusted Platform Module (TPM) chip. It was the act of posting this news on our wiki that launched what can only be called the OSx86 revolution. What began with digg soon spread to Slashdot and others, bringing visitors by the thousands to our website, all curious about the possibilities of installing OS X on their PCs. Having just launched a tiny forum a few weeks earlier, we were amazed at the number of people who joined. OSx86 was truly becoming a phenomenon. On July 30, 2005, the first OSx86 installation disk was leaked. Here's what I posted on the wiki (which was our news page) at the time: We can now confirm that the DVD that was included with the Developer Transition Kits has leaked and has been placed on a major torrent site with the name of "Apple.OS.X.x86.Developer.Kit.Install.DVD-pheNIX." According to sources, the DVD image is in .dmg format and an NFO was included. Of course, we can only assume that this DVD will not immediately be ready to install on x86 machines, as it still incorporates SSE3 and the TPM. More news as it happens... UPDATE: Sources indicate that the torrent has now spread to many of the most popular Bit Torrent sites. However, there seems to be an issue with the tracker reporting few or no seeders, although there are many. Also, news of this leak has now spread to many other popular computing websites, including that of our friends over at pearpc.net. Of course, as you all know, the news broke here first. :-) As pursuant to our warez policy, we do not encourage the theft of copyrighted material. We report - you decide. The intimate details of that leak weren't known to many. Rampant speculation was that Apple leaked it intentionally, and while that would make for a much better story, it wasn't the case. An IRC chap who we’ll call ColdKill had contacted someone from a random forum who mentioned that his corporation (a large Silicon Valley firm we've all heard of) had purchased a DevKit. ColdKill asked for a copy of the install disk and the developer agreed. The developer called the disk image "Marklar" after the codename of Apple's Intel project from previous years. After agonizing days of slowly downloading the image via FTP, ColdKill brought together a handful of IRC friends to help release a torrent; the idea being that the more people who could eventually access the files, the quicker it would be cracked. One of the funny things about that initial leak was the format - the developer who leaked it, being a Mac user, ripped the disk into a .dmg file. Since all the would-be hackers weren’t using a Mac yet, this presented a problem. Hours were spent trying to convert the file using a Windows program until someone finally discovered one that worked. The hackers were ecstatic and immediately began dissecting the contents. The files for a complete OS X installation were now available to anyone - the trick would be creating a working copy. A community was beginning to form, and it would only be a matter of days until the beauty of Aqua first graced the monitor of a PC. Stay tuned for A History of OSx86, Part II later this week...
  23. Tell us your favorite Mac news and opinion sites and how often you check/read them! Macbytes: Twice a week ArsTechnica: RSS MacNN: RSS MacWorld: Once a week iLounge: RSS OSx86 Project: Several times an hour AppleMatters: Once a week AppleInsider: Every other day ThinkSecret: Twice a week MacRumors: Once a week Also, what are the best designed Mac sites? Let us know what you like and what you don't like in a Mac site - your suggestions may get incorporated into our site!
  24. Swad

    Forum Rules. Read. Then Post.

    RULES FOR POSTING: FLAMING 1) Just don't do it. We'll edit the posts, so no one will see it anyway. Don't waste your time and ours. 2) There will be NO discrimination on this board be it through gender, race, or creed. If you violate this one, you're IMMEDIATELY banned. No questions asked. BANNING It's a 3-strikes-and-you're-out policy. This means 3 warnings and then you're banned. *Depending on the severity of the offense, we reserve the right to immediately ban you without warning. A ban includes your IP and host name being banned from the board, and in extreme circumstances, your ISP will be traced and consulted. WAREZ AND DMCA POLICY Anyone who violates this policy or replies to someone who has requested, posting a link in the reply, will be warned. Depending on how many people try this in conjunction with each other, you may be banned immediately, so... don't press your luck. 1) No posting of direct links to warez or pirated pieces of software. We do not support the pirating of software. 2) Torrent files are not allowed, nor are links to torrents. 3) Open source (like Darwin) drivers and kexts are allowed, but OS X files are not, due to copyright. 4) No discussion on how to break the TPM. It's ok to talk about the TPM and cracks that you may find, but telling someone how to do it is wrong. These rules cover a broad spectrum. They, in conjunction with common sense and good judgement, should steer you in the right direction. We're all human and we know that people make mistakes... don't take that for granted. More rules are subject to appear on this board as we see fit, so please check back from time to time for your own benefit. Ignorance of the rules is no excuse.
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