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Rammjet

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  1. Like
    Rammjet got a reaction from XTuga in [How To] Tips for Finding Vendor and Device ID's   
    [How To] Tips for Finding Vendor and Device ID's
     
    The following explains what vendor and device id's are and how to find and use them in your installation.
     
    Why Vendor and Device ID's
     
    Every device that makes up a computer needs to have a unique identifier. The operating system uses this identifier to bind a driver to that device. The unique identifier is made up of an industry-assigned code for the vendor (manufacturer) of the device and a serial number for that device which is assigned by the vendor. Each of these two values is made up of 4 hexadecimal (hex) characters.
     
    For instance, the vendor id of Intel is 0x8086, where the leading "0x" identifies this as a hex value. The actual vendor id is the 4 characters "8086".
     
    OSX keeps a list of all vendor id's and device id's that are contained in the kexts installed in the system. When the computer is booted, OSX quizzes the ROM on each device to get its vendor and device id's. Then it uses its list to see if a match exists, and if it does, it binds the kext (driver) to that device.
     
    How to Find Vendor and Device ID's
     
    System Profiler is found in the Utilities folder of OSX. You can also access it through "About This Mac" by clicking the "More Info..." button.
     
    Click on the device type (PCI, USB) in the left pane and find the device in the right pane. You should see a vendor id and a device id. You may have to click on the device in the right pane and read the values at bottom right.
     
    If you cannot find the values there, then you should try reading them in Windows.
     
    Windows - Go to Windows and open Device Manager. Find your device and get Properties for that device. Click the Details tab and read the vendor id and device id. The vendor id is the 4 characters after the letters "VEN_" and the device id is the 4 characters after the letters "DEV_".
     
    If you do not find a Details tab in Device Manager, then read this.
     
    If you do not have Windows on your computer, you can also use Linux.
     
    Linux - use the "lspci" command. In Linux, read the "man" page for the command by typing: man lspci
     
    Google - if all else fails, try Google. If you have a motherboard XYZ and want to find the vendor and device of the ethernet device, try a search like this: XYZ ethernet vendor device.
     
    If you have a computer like a Dell ABC and want the wireless device, try a Google search like this: Dell ABC wireless vendor device.
     
    Read several of the returned articles until you get 2 or 3 that agree on the correct values.
     
    What the Vendor and Device ID's Mean
     
    Once you have the vendor and device id's, you might want to verify that they are valid. To do that, you can use the Linux PCI ID Repository found here.
     
    First, find your vendor id and read the entry for it to see if it sounds like it could be the vendor for your device. Then click on the vendor id in the left column and find your device id. Read the entry for that to see if it sounds like your device.
     
    How Vendor and Device ID's Are Used in Kexts
     
    The vendor and device ids are used in the kext (driver) to tell OSX to bind that particular kext to the device with the vendor/device id's. The id's are placed into the Info.plist file inside the kext. To see the Info.plist, right-click on the kext and select "Show Package Contents". Open the Contents folder and find the Info.plist. Drag and drop the Info.plist onto TextEdit (in Applications folder) to view the contents of the file.
     
    The entry for the vendor and device ids can take different forms. There is no hard and fast rule, just observe what that particular kext uses and follow along. Here are some examples:
     

    <key>IONameMatch</key> <key>IOPCIPrimaryMatch</key> <key>IOPCIMatch</key> <string>pci8086,27d8</string> <string>0x27d88086</string> <string>0x808627d8</string>
    In this example, the vendor id is "8086" and the device id is "27d8". Chances are when you look at the Info.plist, your vendor id will match one that is already there. Use that as your clue as to the arrangement of the vendor and device id's. Otherwise, use the Linux PCI ID Repository explained above to help determine which is a vendor id and which is a device id. Then place your values in the same pattern.
  2. Like
    Rammjet got a reaction from SUN_sw1 in [How To] Solutions for Keyboards, Trackpads & Mice   
    Keyboards, TrackPads and Mice
     
    This is a compilation of many of the different keyboard, trackpad and mice solutions available. It is not exhaustive. If you don't find what you want, search for it.
     
    Please do not post questions in this thread looking for a solution that is not listed. Use other threads for that.
     
    Please do post other good known keyboard, etc. solutions in this thread. I will try to incorporate any posted solutions into the list. Otherwise, users can read the thread for any other solutions.
     


    Drivers ALPS Trackpad driver - find it here and another here
     
    Enhanced Apple PS/2 driver - find it here
     
    Hacked Apple PS/2 driver - find it here

    Keyboard Bindings and Layouts
    Key Bindings - Change a few keys on your keyboard. Read this and this .
     
    Key Bindings - Adjust sound volume up/down with Function keys using a method from Stravaganza .
     
    Keyboard Layout (ABNT2) - Brazilian Portuguese. Go here .
     
    Keyboard Layout (PT PT) - Portuguese. Go here .
     
    Keyboard Layout - Make Your Own - use Ukelele. Go here .

    Keyboard Shortcuts
    Shortcuts available - Read this and this . You can also go to the Help menu in Finder and search on "shortcut lists".
     
    Modify your shortcuts by going to: System Preferences -> Keyboard & Mouse.
     
    Change Modifier keys in Keyboard tab and change shortcuts in Keyboard Shortcuts tab. For the adventurous, review the Key Bindings entry.
    Hot Keys - Many apps like Quicksilver, Butler and Proxi can set up hot keys to perform all sorts of things.
    Volume control - control your volume with hot keys using an app and these Applescripts.
    Keyboard & Trackpad don't work
    Repair Permissions - Try the following: Boot from install DVD and enter the installer. Select Terminal in the Utilities menu and type:
     
    cd "/Volumes/(name-of-OSX-partition)" <--- use quotes if name has spaces - but don't use parentheses diskutil repairPermissions ./ cd System/Library rm -rf Extensions.mkext Extensions.kextcache cd Extensions find ApplePS2Controller.kext -type d -exec chmod 755 {} \; find ApplePS2Controller.kext -type f -exec chmod 644 {} \; chown -R root:wheel ApplePS2Controller.kext

    Quit Terminal and the Installer and Reboot without the DVD

    Kext Unload/Load - If repairing permissions above doesn't help, then try to modify the boot script by adding commands to unload and then reload the kexts.
     
    Try the following:
    Boot from install DVD and enter the installer. Select Terminal in the Utilities menu and type:
     
    ( -- use quotation marks in commands as shown below --) ( -- going to use some variables to cut down on typing --) dp="/Volumes/(name-of-OSX-partition)" <--- use quotes, no parentheses nano "$dp/usr/bin/nano $dp/etc/rc.local" kp="/System/Library/Extensions/ApplePS2Controller.kext/Contents/PlugIns" kextunload "$kp/ApplePS2Keyboard.kext" kextload "$kp/ApplePS2Keyboard.kext" ( -- press Command-O to save --) ( -- press Y and <Enter> to accept --) ( -- press Command-X to quit --)

    Quit Terminal and the Installer and Reboot without the DVD

    ATI Xpress 200M - According to Prasys , the USB Driver creates a confusion that disables the onboard trackpad and keyboard. To fix it, drop his kext onto your Desktop and go to Terminal and type: cd /System/Library/Extensions sudo mkdir usb_backup ( -- give password -- ) sudo cp -Rf IOUSBFamily.kext usb_backup/ sudo cp -Rf ~/Desktop/IOUSBFamily.kext ./ sudo chown -R root:wheel IOUSBFamily.kext sudo chmod -R 755 IOUSBFamily.kext cd /System/Library sudo rm -rf Extensions.mkext Extensions.kextcache

    Reboot
    PS/2 Keyboard and USB Mouse - disable 2 kexts as follows:
    Boot your install DVD and go into the installer. Select Terminal in the Utilities menu and type:
     
    cd "/Volumes/(name-of-OSX-partition)" <--- use quotes if name has spaces - but don't use parentheses cd System/Library rm -rf Extensions.mkext Extensions.kextcache cd Extensions/ApplePS2Controller.kext/Contents/PlugIns mv ApplePS2Trackpad.kext ApplePS2Trackpad.kext.bak mv ApplePS2Mouse.kext ApplePS2Mouse.kext.bak

    Quit Terminal and the Installer and Reboot without the DVD

     
  3. Like
    Rammjet got a reaction from XTuga in [How To] Tips for Finding Vendor and Device ID's   
    [How To] Tips for Finding Vendor and Device ID's
     
    The following explains what vendor and device id's are and how to find and use them in your installation.
     
    Why Vendor and Device ID's
     
    Every device that makes up a computer needs to have a unique identifier. The operating system uses this identifier to bind a driver to that device. The unique identifier is made up of an industry-assigned code for the vendor (manufacturer) of the device and a serial number for that device which is assigned by the vendor. Each of these two values is made up of 4 hexadecimal (hex) characters.
     
    For instance, the vendor id of Intel is 0x8086, where the leading "0x" identifies this as a hex value. The actual vendor id is the 4 characters "8086".
     
    OSX keeps a list of all vendor id's and device id's that are contained in the kexts installed in the system. When the computer is booted, OSX quizzes the ROM on each device to get its vendor and device id's. Then it uses its list to see if a match exists, and if it does, it binds the kext (driver) to that device.
     
    How to Find Vendor and Device ID's
     
    System Profiler is found in the Utilities folder of OSX. You can also access it through "About This Mac" by clicking the "More Info..." button.
     
    Click on the device type (PCI, USB) in the left pane and find the device in the right pane. You should see a vendor id and a device id. You may have to click on the device in the right pane and read the values at bottom right.
     
    If you cannot find the values there, then you should try reading them in Windows.
     
    Windows - Go to Windows and open Device Manager. Find your device and get Properties for that device. Click the Details tab and read the vendor id and device id. The vendor id is the 4 characters after the letters "VEN_" and the device id is the 4 characters after the letters "DEV_".
     
    If you do not find a Details tab in Device Manager, then read this.
     
    If you do not have Windows on your computer, you can also use Linux.
     
    Linux - use the "lspci" command. In Linux, read the "man" page for the command by typing: man lspci
     
    Google - if all else fails, try Google. If you have a motherboard XYZ and want to find the vendor and device of the ethernet device, try a search like this: XYZ ethernet vendor device.
     
    If you have a computer like a Dell ABC and want the wireless device, try a Google search like this: Dell ABC wireless vendor device.
     
    Read several of the returned articles until you get 2 or 3 that agree on the correct values.
     
    What the Vendor and Device ID's Mean
     
    Once you have the vendor and device id's, you might want to verify that they are valid. To do that, you can use the Linux PCI ID Repository found here.
     
    First, find your vendor id and read the entry for it to see if it sounds like it could be the vendor for your device. Then click on the vendor id in the left column and find your device id. Read the entry for that to see if it sounds like your device.
     
    How Vendor and Device ID's Are Used in Kexts
     
    The vendor and device ids are used in the kext (driver) to tell OSX to bind that particular kext to the device with the vendor/device id's. The id's are placed into the Info.plist file inside the kext. To see the Info.plist, right-click on the kext and select "Show Package Contents". Open the Contents folder and find the Info.plist. Drag and drop the Info.plist onto TextEdit (in Applications folder) to view the contents of the file.
     
    The entry for the vendor and device ids can take different forms. There is no hard and fast rule, just observe what that particular kext uses and follow along. Here are some examples:
     

    <key>IONameMatch</key> <key>IOPCIPrimaryMatch</key> <key>IOPCIMatch</key> <string>pci8086,27d8</string> <string>0x27d88086</string> <string>0x808627d8</string>
    In this example, the vendor id is "8086" and the device id is "27d8". Chances are when you look at the Info.plist, your vendor id will match one that is already there. Use that as your clue as to the arrangement of the vendor and device id's. Otherwise, use the Linux PCI ID Repository explained above to help determine which is a vendor id and which is a device id. Then place your values in the same pattern.
  4. Like
    Rammjet got a reaction from Haymac in [How to] Setting Your Partition "Active" Using Fdisk in MacOSX   
    There are a lot of people who experience a b0 error on their first boot up after installation. Or the bootloader immediately takes them back to the Windows installation (on dual boot).
     
    These people probably forgot to set the MacOSX partition "Active"
     
    A common mantra provided here to newbies for setting up for installation is:
    Make the partition Primary
    Make the partition ID=AF (signifies an HFS partition)
    Make the partition Active
    There is a built-in Unix utility in MacOSX that can be used to set your partition "Active". It is called Fdisk
     
     
    Setting Your Partition "Active" Using Fdisk
     
    Words in bold below are things you must type (followed by Enter).
     
    1. Boot your Mac OS X install dvd
    2. Once the installer is running, go to the Utilities menu and open Terminal
     
    3. Determine which disk your MacOSX partition is on


    Type diskutil list
     
    Verify which disk number holds your partition (disk 0 , disk 1 , etc.)
     
    4. Start using Fdisk


    Assuming the MacOSX disk is the first disk ("disk0"), then
    type fdisk -e /dev/rdisk0 <== use "rdisk" with your disk number here !!
     
    Ignore the error "fdisk: could not open MBR file ..."
     
    5. Determine which partition for MacOSX needs to be set "Active"


    Type p
     
    Verify which partition is for MacOSX (1, 2, 3, etc.)
     
    6. Set the partition "Active"


    Assuming it is partition 1, then
    type f 1 <== use your partition number here !!
     
    7. Save and exit


    Type write
     
    Type y (yes you are sure)
     
    Type exit (to quit)
     
    8. Remove the install DVD and reboot
  5. Like
    Rammjet got a reaction from Haymac in [How to] Setting Your Partition "Active" Using Fdisk in MacOSX   
    There are a lot of people who experience a b0 error on their first boot up after installation. Or the bootloader immediately takes them back to the Windows installation (on dual boot).
     
    These people probably forgot to set the MacOSX partition "Active"
     
    A common mantra provided here to newbies for setting up for installation is:
    Make the partition Primary
    Make the partition ID=AF (signifies an HFS partition)
    Make the partition Active
    There is a built-in Unix utility in MacOSX that can be used to set your partition "Active". It is called Fdisk
     
     
    Setting Your Partition "Active" Using Fdisk
     
    Words in bold below are things you must type (followed by Enter).
     
    1. Boot your Mac OS X install dvd
    2. Once the installer is running, go to the Utilities menu and open Terminal
     
    3. Determine which disk your MacOSX partition is on


    Type diskutil list
     
    Verify which disk number holds your partition (disk 0 , disk 1 , etc.)
     
    4. Start using Fdisk


    Assuming the MacOSX disk is the first disk ("disk0"), then
    type fdisk -e /dev/rdisk0 <== use "rdisk" with your disk number here !!
     
    Ignore the error "fdisk: could not open MBR file ..."
     
    5. Determine which partition for MacOSX needs to be set "Active"


    Type p
     
    Verify which partition is for MacOSX (1, 2, 3, etc.)
     
    6. Set the partition "Active"


    Assuming it is partition 1, then
    type f 1 <== use your partition number here !!
     
    7. Save and exit


    Type write
     
    Type y (yes you are sure)
     
    Type exit (to quit)
     
    8. Remove the install DVD and reboot
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