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elviejo

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About elviejo

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  1. well, after more tries no dice, the same firmware error surface.
  2. You were right, with iMac14,2 we lost the USB3 ports in the back.....so back to mac mini6,2. In the next two days I'm going to try again to install High Sierra with Oz only support, will keep posted.
  3. This is a hobby and I can assure you we have time to use it and much more, not everybody have the same interests and that is ok.
  4. I understand your point of view, check this http://fortune.com/2017/09/29/apple-mac-update-security-sierra-firmware/, apparently that is one of the problems and I think here reside the solution http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/topic/291655-ozmosis/?p=2502416, about the USB3 ports I think they are working fine, check the ioreg attached.Jose’s Mac Pro.ioreg.zip
  5. If you read my post http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/topic/285920-new-os-x-compatible-motherboard-quo/?p=2501432, you will see that I have the same problem and have to use clover to pass the second stage because the firmware error even as I used the same plist, I think Ozmosis is not passing the firmware information to the installer, that is something I hope the coders ( Hello ccepawon ) would take a look on it; for the moment I suggest to use the clover avenue ( only to pass the firmware error ) or you could wait until a solution is found. Good luck. This are the latest: http://www.insanelymac.com/forum/topic/291655-ozmosis/?p=2502506
  6. I'm working on it and I'm sure I am not the only one. so attached are templates for the rom, the rom posted has the OzmosisDefaults.plist removed and there is one without the serials, you can obtain the serials with clover configurator ( use the last updated one ) and insert the serials with Xcode or a plist editor ( don't use a text editor!!! ) after that convert it to ffs with kext to ffs and insert it in the rom with UEFI Tool ( how to do it can be learn in the Ozmosis section on the Forum ). Good luck. Ozmosis templates.zip
  7. elviejo

    Ozmosis

    Where we can found current versions of SMC+sensors and Ozmosis?
  8. Today I made the upgrade to High Sierra from beta developer and it wasn't easy, first of all the firmware error creep back again so I have to update the Ozmosis Defaults.plist in bios ( I don't use the efi option in the first hdd ), the good news, there is no more restrictions to the usb ports, so I use iMac 14,2 settings, but it keep giving the firmware error in the second stage, at that point I tried the second stage with clover ( same defaults.plist ) and was able to pass the firmware error but the installation hangs with apple acpicpu, so I boot normal with f12 and High Sierra wasn't in the entries, I choose to boot to Sierra ( Thank God I have Sierra on another drive ) and select to boot to High Sierra in start up disk in System preferences and was able to finish the installation, this was a clean installation, then another problem arise when I try to migrate my High Sierra beta with Migration Assistant, no matter what I did it always fail at the end so I go back to Sierra and erase the High Sierra drive and made a restoration of my High Sierra beta from Time Machine and run the installer from there ( I tried the startosinstall method and it didn't work ) the install didn't work booting with Ozmosis so I used Clover again to finish the installation, boot to Sierra choose High Sierra in start up disk and voila I have High Sierra installed with all my settings and applications. So there is several problems in Ozmosis that have to be solved to have a smooth installation; first the recognition of the apfs drives in the boot stage is problematic and the firmware settings don't appear to be passed to the installer, until this is solved is going to be troublesome to install.
  9. elviejo

    [pre-release] macOS High Sierra

    apfs.efi go in drivers64uefi without renaming.
  10. elviejo

    [pre-release] macOS High Sierra

    Another solution is to install as hfs+, install clover to the EFI partition then attach the drive to another HS installation, open disk utility, dismount the drive go to edit and convert it to APFS, the only drawback is that you need another system with HS installed to do this, but I warranty it works, I did it in a Toshiba L855-S5309 and it works.
  11. elviejo

    [pre-release] macOS High Sierra

    Maybe creating a second partition and doing this: How to hide a hard drive partition on your Mac August 27, 2014 Generally when you either partition your Mac’s boot drive, or attach a secondary drive to your Mac, then provided the partition’s formatting is compatible with OS X, you should see it mount and be available in the Finder. However, there may be times when you might wish to keep a partition hidden, either because you do not use it, or because it is not intended to be shown in the first place. Some examples of this are the “EFI” or “Recovery HD” partitions on your boot drive, that support system functions but are not intended to be accessed directly; however, in some cases (especially in dual-boot environments) you might find these showing up. Of course, modifying the contents of these may destabilize your system or prevent some features from working properly, so you might want to prevent these from mounting. If you have partitions showing on your Mac that you would like to hide, then you can do so, but will need to get under the hood with some Terminal commands. Don’t worry, the methods used here are entirely harmless and can easily be undone: 1. Get the partition’s UUID The volume’s UUID can be found and copied here in the Disk Utility info window (click image for larger view). Open Disk Utility, where you should see the list of volumes (partitions) for each drive on your Mac. Select the drive you want to hide, and press Command-i to get information on it. Resize the info window that appears to reveal the entire Universal Unique Identifier (UUID) for the drive, and then select and copy the entire UUID. The UUID can also be found in the Terminal by typing “diskutil info,” followed by a single space, and then dragging the desired hard drive to the Terminal window before pressing Enter. For instance, the following command will get info on a volume called “EFI”: diskutil info /Volumes/EFI You can then find “Volume UUID” in the output of this command to find the UUID needed to hide this partition. 2. Edit or create the “fstab” file The “fstab” file is a hidden system file that is used to specify how partitions are handled in OS X, where you can have them mount at specific points other than the default, or mount only in read mode. We are going to use it to prevent the partition (identified by its UUID) from mounting. To create or edit this file, open the Terminal and run the following command from an administrative account: sudo pico /etc/fstab This will open an editor, in which you will enter the syntax needed to hide the drive. 3. Add the fstab commands to hide the drive Enter the following command, replacing the UUID consisting of zeros with the one you copied for your partition’s volume. UUID=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000 none hfs rw,noauto What this command does is specify the identifier (the UUID), then the mount point (none), followed by the format (hfs), and then options (read/write, and no auto mount). The keys here are that the mount point is set to none, which prevents the drive from mounting, and noauto, which prevents an attempt to automatically mount it. The UUID specified (arrow) in the fstab file will be set to not mount automatically. You can specify as many drives you want in the fstab file, by adding one per line. When finished, to save the file press Control-O (this writes out the file), and then press Control-X to exit the editor. With the fstab file updated and saved, you can now reboot your system, and the specified drives should no longer automatically mount. Keep in mind that this will only pertain to the current operating system, so if you dual-boot your Mac and see these drives load in more than one OS X installation you use, then you will have to follow these instructions to edit the fstab file for each OS. While this can be used for hiding system partitions like the Recovery HD and EFI, you can also hide any other partitions you might not want inadvertently modified. Just similarly add them to the fstab file, followed by rebooting and they should also hide. Undoing the changes If for some reason you no longer want a partition hidden, then simply edit the fstab file and remove the line that specifies the partition. If you have not used the fstab file for other purposes, then you can also simply delete it by running the following command in an administrative account, followed by restarting: sudo rm /etc/fstab Then install clover in that partition ( I think must be Fat32 ) and format the other partition as APFS.
  12. elviejo

    Ozmosis

    Back in business with the new apfs.
  13. elviejo

    Ozmosis

    With the new beta 3 my ozmosis no longer detect the high sierra apfs, I have to boot to sierra and select high sierra as a startup disk to boot it. I'm going to try with the new apfs.efi to see what happen.
  14. elviejo

    Ozmosis

    When I did it I lost apfs support. could you explain how to do it? From my High Sierra installed from Oz.
  15. elviejo

    Ozmosis

    Didn't work here
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