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Haplo

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About Haplo

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    InsanelyMac Protégé
  1. Haplo

    Code Editors

    I'm a hardcore XCode user. It's by far the nicest IDE around, not to mention free. The only problem with it right now is the serious problems with java. If you need to use java, I suggest eclipse until they fix it in XCode.
  2. Haplo

    XCode 2.2.1 (Universal)

    I had the same issue, but it did still install. Java, however, is broken in XCode.
  3. I'm moving this from the collaberate forum because that place is deader than George Bush's brain cells. irc channel- irc.cyanide-x.net #SCMCode For anyone who's played starcraft and made maps, you know that windows has StarForge, SCXE, SCMD2 and other small tools for mapmaking. On mac, we had regular blizzard issue StarEdit, which was never carbonized, and now intel-mac users have absolutely nothing. On top of that, even our best patched StarEdit editors can't come close to the capabilities of SF and SCMD2. While there is a port of SCMD2 coming along, it's being done by one person who really doesn't care, and even then won't do everything we need it to. So, I'm starting a project called SCMCode, a new fully featured mapmaking IDE in cocoa/objective-C. I'm looking for several people (maybe 5 total, including myself) to split the work up for this project, and maybe a few others if someone is interested in making a windows port. I have the features in mind, and it will include the application of these technologies: Core Image Core Data A spotlight/quicksilver-like searching system (for a special purpose). A new system of GUI interaction for faster map editing, without palettes taking up space or being in your way. I'm not going to list the features I have planned right now, first I want to see who is interested, then I need to list out the ones I can remember and organize them, then get some input from other people before organizing the objects in the project. Current staff- Project Leader/Coordinating Manager: Haplo Programmers (currently): Epoch, Obsolete Valkaire. If you'd like to volunteer for this, just list your programming experience and what, in general, you'd like to do in this project. We will be using XCode as our IDE.
  4. For anyone who's played starcraft and made maps, you know that windows has StarForge, SCXE, SCMD2 and other small tools for mapmaking. On mac, we had regular blizzard issue StarEdit, which was never carbonized, and now intel-mac users have absolutely nothing. On top of that, even our best patched StarEdit editors can't come close to the capabilities of SF and SCMD2. While there is a port of SCMD2 coming along, it's being done by one person who really doesn't care, and even then won't do everything we need it to. So, after learning C/C++ and then obj-C, I'm starting a project called SCMCode, a new fully featured mapmaking IDE in cocoa/objective-C. I'll need several people (maybe 5 total, including myself) to split the work up for this project, and maybe a few others if someone is interested in making a windows port. I have the features in mind, and it will include the application of these technologies: Core Image Core Data A spotlight/quicksilver-like searching system (for a special purpose). A new system of GUI interaction for faster map editing, without palettes taking up space or being in your way. I'm not going to list the features I have planned right now, first I want to see who is interested, then I need to list out the ones I can remember and organize them, then get some input from other people before organizing the objects in the project. Project Leader/Coordinating Manager: Haplo Programmers (currently): Epoch, Obsolete Valkaire. If you'd like to volunteer for this, just list your programming experience and what, in general, you'd like to do in this project. We will be using XCode as our IDE. EDIT: irc channel- irc.cyanide-x.net #SCMCode
  5. Haplo

    Think about this

    Well, if you compare the mini to the iBook, and max overclock your mini (to the highest safe lvl of 1.5GHz, of course) then you're running a box that's faster than what I'm running now. I'll say this, my iBook is more than fast enough for anything I do, from video encoding to Photoshop and definitely fast enough for basic tasks, so for the price of the mini, you're certainly getting your money's worth.
  6. My thought is that if apple really cares (and they certainly seem to), then this sort of hacking will only be effective until about third quarter of this year, when they settle down in their hardware. Then they might be able to nest the protection far enough that nobody will be able to crack it before a new OS update comes out. It's likely that several updates will follow 10.4.4 to iron out the initial bugs, and that will cause some big trouble for those running hackintoshes.
  7. You would think they'd have learned this after the fiasco with first run G5s. Those were hoards of trouble, but the later models ran smooth. The first intels (and we're now getting this from both intel AND apple) are bound to be trouble, but will level out after 2-3 OS updates. If you wait till Q3 of '06, intel-macs will be standard edition and all of the chaos of the transition will have passed over by then, instead replaced by the 'holy {censored} this conroe powermac is sexy' that will come once we're back up to 64bit.
  8. bahaha. Nice. Gotta give you props there ^^.
  9. I haven't had any problems with my iBook power cord.. And that's saying nothing about the newest OS update, which won't let the battery fall below 95% charge when the computer is on AC power (and if you know anything about lithium ion batteries you'd know that this improves overall battery life). Bear: Of course they don't. =\.
  10. Haplo

    Apple's 1984 Commercial

    I personally like the one where they have the intel engineer guy in his anti dust/static environment suit, and then set him on fire ^^.
  11. lol. I have all 4 seasons of coupling ^^. I can't believe the guy who played Jeff quit though =[.
  12. Uh, no. I think typically they just say "Damn I'm pissed" as opposed to "Holy {censored} am I drunk".
  13. lol. I bet you had some fun confusion there ;P. Off Topic: BTW are you familiar with Red Dwarf and Coupling?
  14. Well, truly I wish that intel had moved to RISC long ago. The RISC architecture is far superior to x86 (and newer), however since intel tailors to windows, they stuck with x86. The fact that intel processors run so fast really has nothing to do with the general architecture, just that intel is really good at making chips (and rich enough to do what they feel like). Point in case, AMD processors are only about as fast as the PPC G5s (although not nearly as good and far more riddled with errors) in mhz speed at least, and those are x86. That beside the point, might I point out that adobe's gloating had nothing to do with apple's release date. They said they would be 'one of the first companies, if not the first' to have unibin apps. Their competition is with other vendors, who have already made unibins while Adobe sits around. I agree that apple hasn't exactly made it a walk in the park since Jobs came back. I mean, first developers had to move from OS9 to OSX. For old applications it wasn't so hard since they had carbon, for newer applications it was extremely easy, however, since they gave us Objective-C. The move to intel from PPC really isn't nearly a big of a deal as people are claiming, however. For people who have been lazy (ex adobe. If they have a whole team of people porting code to mac, then they have enough people to have made it full cocoa long ago) and kept supporting legacy OS9 (from about OSX 10.1 to 10.2 OS9 was still viable, although much less so in 10.2, but now OS9 is obsolete, even though carbon is just now being depreciated.) or were just too lazy to port their code (cough) it's now a bigger pain. For the majority of cocoa programmers, though, even commercial ones, the move is of minor impact at best. A program written within apple's guidelines, even using ALL of the new OS core services (Core Image, Audio, Data, vDSP, vImage), however not implementing altivec code manually (although the ability to do it via compiler option is pretty new, and one of my fav new features), sticking in PPC assembly, or anything like that, have NO work to do to have a fully working unibin. Although I didn't pay a whole lot of attention to the transition specs, I don't remember a significant amount of things that a developer who actually did what apple said would have to do. Now, if Adobe was keeping up Windows, OSX, linux, etc versions of Photoshop, then maybe I would cut them a little slack. But no, they're only keeping up two versions. If the devs of Blender3D can do it with a volunteer staff and support for 5 different operating systems over 3 different processor architectures, then why the hell can't Adobe?
  15. BTW my old site (which is no longer up) just used strategic text coloing/bg coloring and text alignment for the appearance. It was simple, but image free. I mean, for what I was doing images were simply more stuff I didn't need. Oh, well, now I have a javascript site with image flips and all of that good stuff. I really need to update that site, I never did finish it. I can't call myself a 'professional webmaster' or any such thing, since I don't get paid for it, but I'm no newb either. I still prefer text over DW ;P. Although, I admit that DW does have some advantages for seeing your code in action, but you could make an editor to do that easily using webkit o.0. One thing I absolutely HATE about DW though, it tabs your code. Now, I know quite a bit about C/C++/Obj-C and java, and in a programming language, you have distinct blocks of nested code, which will tab a reasonable amount and makes it easier to read. However, HTML has ridiculous amounts of nesting, and since code doesn't come in distinct statements (x += 3; vs anything involving a table) if you tab HTML code it starts to look like you're drawing a zig zag across the page. For all intents and purposes, tabbing HTML is useless.
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