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Overclocking the Mac Mini


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#1
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http://www.fastermini.com

#2
DiaboliK

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there is a way to do it you have to desolder some pins and then resolder in a diff location.

same as with some of the g4 powerbooks

#3
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to much traffic on the site, it'll be back soon. ;)

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site is back oline.

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"You can remove the resistors with a soldering iron, if you think you have the skill to do it so, or you can use a box cutter and VERY CAREFULLY remove the resistors."

I don't see why you would have to remove them, can't you just leave them there and bridge across the two wires? Path of least resistance?

#6
DrJgermeister

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"You can remove the resistors with a soldering iron, if you think you have the skill to do it so, or you can use a box cutter and VERY CAREFULLY remove the resistors."

I don't see why you would have to remove them, can't you just leave them there and bridge across the two wires? Path of least resistance?

When you remove a resistance you have unlimited high Ohm, when you make a bridge you have 0 Ohm.

#7
R. Bear Helms

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I've overclocked my 1.25 Ghz mini to 1.50 Ghz.

Remove 2 teeny little resistors (not much bigger than an ant) from the bottom of the motherboard (in a very hard to find area if you aren't familiar with it).

A cheap 65 watt iron with a chisel tip will do the job.

The components they talk about adding (for more speed) are 0 Ohm resistors. E.g., same resistance as a solder bridge or piece of copper wire. You end up needing to patch the boot image for the "About" menu to display correct frequency when you exceed 1.50 Ghz.

Also, stability is more of an issue post 1.50 Ghz as well. I could go faster, but I don't feel it's worth overheating the CPU, patching the boot code, and risking early death of the unit for an extra 180 Mhz or so.

#8
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We tried this on a friend's 1.42GHz mini. 1.5 was fine but leaving R358 in place for 1.58 GHz made it refuse to boot. Although I thought it was fun, she thought it was far too much risk of damage for what turns out to produce no obvious performance difference. Actually I'm inclined to agree with her up to a point - 1.42 to 1.5 isn't very noticeable, if at all. Maybe clocking up an older 1.25 might be worth it.

The guide doesn't tell you about the horrendous cracking noises the mini makes as you open it up; fortunately it doesn't break easily. The guide also does not tell you that it can be suprisingly difficult to get the top back on straight. We got it on twice with gaps where something hadn't lined up and had to go through the removal/replacement process several times. Mind you, we had been drinking... :whistle:





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