Jump to content

For everyone have a mac...why did you buy it ?


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1
M.A.E

M.A.E

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
Why did you buy a mac ? Why not a windows PC ? I just want to know why people buy a mac. What is the feature that in mac and not available in PC ? I think windows supported with more apps than osx, because many apps and games i didn't find a mac copy for them.
And Mac is too expensive compared to other PC's.
Please don't take that as an offense.
I asked that question because i want to buy a new computer and don't know what to buy, mac or pc.
Thanks.

#2
3.14r2

3.14r2

    The Round One

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,333 posts
  • Location:Molvania

...I just want to know why people buy a mac...

Because they can afford it. People who can't afford it (including myself), buy PCs.

 

Macs are good looking, quite well build and have some "luxury/unique/exceptional" status to it. Some buy Macs, just to own a different (then the other guy has) computer. Some buy due to a design (esp. prosperous creative individuals). Some buy it cos' it's an Apple product (all the hype around Apple's products).

 

Whatever the reasons are, Apple does have a very efficient marketing department.

 

As to buying Mac or PC, buy a Mac if you can afford it (and environment you leave in is not dominated by PCs - Macs and PCs doesn't always coexist well; same with many computer related devices - some may don't work with Macs and Apple doesn't give a sh...t about it).



#3
slayer2333

slayer2333

    InsanelyMac Geek

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 165 posts

Was originally a windows based PC user then i purchased a macbook pro late in 2009 (was costing around 2100$), came with an integrated Nvidia 9400 and a discrete 9600 GT which was pretty decent at that time.  The reason i took it was mostly about the fact it was said to be clean of viruses, reliable, stable, strong and future proof.  It was also said to be very good for video/photo editing.

Well yeah the unibody structure is strong yet lightweight, the system itself was pretty reliable and the screen quality was pretty good.  But it is not future proof, in the last years we get a new technology probably each 6month-1 year maximum and the majority of us cannot afford 1500$ each year on such technology, specially because the Apple Products are not very friendly if you want to change hardware or add new one, also a lot of overheating problems (imagine that i was playing Crysis on that Macbook, the keyboard plastic rubber melted :D).

Then i sold it and went back to a windows PC, and to be honest i could not understand myself why i spent 2100$ for an Apple Lappy, except hype it is not really worth it in my opinion.



#4
GhostRaider

GhostRaider

    InsanelyMac Sage

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 340 posts
  • Gender:Male

I bought a Mac because I just wanted a stable operating system and the only way to get the full experience was to buy official Mac hardware. I've had Windows PCs because they are cheaper to buy. Do they get the job done? Yes. I love PCs too and I don't have anything against any OEMs that makes these computers, but I just have a problem with Microsoft. 

 

Ever since Windows 8, I knew Microsoft was getting lost "again". I have no idea what were they thinking but I just got annoyed by them. I have an old 2010 laptop that included Windows 7 on it and I now dual boot OS X on it and works great (though not 100% of course, never got sleep to work) but I've noticed that I don't even boot to Windows anymore. 

 

I have everything I need in OS X, from making movies, iMessaging, programming, etc. What separates OS X from Windows is that OS X doesn't contain any bloatware or those free trials that OEMs put for no reason. I always had to reformat the hard drive so I can get run a clean copy of Windows. 

 

The only thing that OS X doesn't have is games but I use BootCamp on my MacBook Pro to switch between Windows and OS X and I could play games on Windows from there. 

 

It all depends on you basically. In terms of design, my MacBook Pro looks and feels good. Doesn't feel cheap at all. Its not heavy at all and the battery life is very good. I get around 7hrs. I don't really use it as a portable device but instead i converted it into a Mac Mini (2 in 1), which means I connect a 24' external display to the Thunderbolt port and use a wireless keyboard and mouse. If I ever want to take it out somewhere, I just disconnect everything and I'm on my way. 

 

Again if you ever need to run Windows on it, you can always use BootCamp for that or I guess use VMware and run it alongside OS X. Now if your the type of person who needs a powerful computer that can run the latest pc games at high performance, then maybe a PC would be better as long as it has a dedicated graphics card. Apple has laptops with dedicated graphics on them but I honestly believe they are too expensive. 



#5
vbetts

vbetts

    InsanelyMac Deity

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,606 posts
  • Gender:Male

For work, they gave me an allowance of $700 and I just paid the difference for a Macbook Air 11". It's light, compact, great design, and build quality wise no other notebook or ultrabook in the price range comes close to the Air. I wanted a notebook for quick documenting, logging, and access to some of our network servers. The Air does all of that, and gives me 100% compatibility with Os X 24/7 which helps a lot too.

 

Any windows apps I would need like Office, I just use our virtual machines and slap it on my network drive for work.



#6
Long Cat

Long Cat

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 77 posts

For the last few years my thinking has been like this: Mac's for portables, PC's for non-portables.

 

I know it's a cliche but Mac's do "just work". And when you're out and only need to do relatively light or fast stuff, you don't want to be pissing around installing Windows updates or waiting for the multitude of other things that seem to waste your time on a PC laptop. Mac's generally give great battery life, decent weights and have arguably the best design qualities of any laptop. I love the no BS approach they take with their products. For 'quick and easy' stuff, I think not having to deal with the pitfalls of PC laptops is worth the premium. If my mum knew how to use computers, I'd tell her to get a Mac... they're just easier.

 

But when it comes to desktops (for people like us), not so much. Here things like additional tasks taking up CPU time, weights, battery life and even design (sort of) don't matter. And when it comes down to power for dollar, PC's will always win. Plus, as you all know: build a custom one, get the exact config you want (don't be forced into something Apple thought was best for you), and run Windows AND OS X... what more could you want.

 

Personally, I love the satisfaction you get from creating and maintaining a hackintosh too. If I had just bought an entry level MacPro instead of my current system... well firstly I'd have a lot less power at my disposal. And secondly once the novelty wears off, I'd be board! Why? Because I didn't do anything other than pay for it. No personal satisfaction. Just an appliance. Yeah, sometimes things don't work as expected, but fixing them is part of the fun.

 

In all honesty my Hack Pro + MacBook Pro is the best setup I've ever experienced.

 

Also...

 

 

 

I bought a Mac because I just wanted a stable operating system and the only way to get the full experience was to buy official Mac hardware.

 

I would tend to disagree with this actually. With the right selection of parts and a lot of care and attention (especially once you start hooking up Apple peripherals i.e. keyboard, mouse, cinema display) you can get the full experience on a hack. For instance, when I hook up the MBP to my desktop peripherals, the only differences I notice are much reduced performance and graphics, less noise and a different boot sequence.



#7
vbetts

vbetts

    InsanelyMac Deity

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,606 posts
  • Gender:Male

You do get compatibility when you get the right parts, and install it the right way. For my personal time that's fine and I love messing with it! But on business time, I don't have the time or want to do that.



#8
Long Cat

Long Cat

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 77 posts

Oh sure. Yeah, a well wet-up hack is great, but I would never use it in an office/ business environment either. Maybe as a personal graphics workstation, but if my livelihood depended on it, I'd at least want a backup machine because you never know.

 

Then again (once booted/ woken from sleep fully), it's NEVER crashed/ kernel panicked on me. Not once in over a year. Which is more than I can say for Windows on the same hardware.



#9
jmp473

jmp473

    InsanelyMac Protégé

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 2 posts

I was looking for value.  
I purchased my Mac Mini in 2006 as a refurbished unit for about $500.00.   It was the most economical purchase I could have made, then and now.   It has been my only and daily used computer, ever since.   The only problem I've had was, in 2009 right after the cat knocked it off the desk and onto the floor, I had to re-install the OS starting from the original boot disk (in order to get past the flashing ?).   My previous Mac  (a Powermac 9600) lasted 10 years and I just installed Mavericks on the Mini - hope and expect I'll get 10 years of use out of it as well (although a graphics upgrade would now be welcome).   :)







0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

© 2014 InsanelyMac  |   News  |   Forum  |   Downloads  |   OSx86 Wiki  |   Mac Netbook  |   Web hosting by CatN  |   Designed by Ed Gain  |   Logo by irfan  |   Privacy Policy