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Still Waiting for root device on Gigabyte boards.


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#1
TheParadox

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Looks like I got this bug thats been discussed here:

 

http://www.insanelym...ng#entry1855566

 

I think its in relation to gigabyte boards.  Was wondering if anyone else had the same problem on gigabyte boards and how they worked around it.



#2
Gringo Vermelho

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The most important thing to know is the make and model of the drive controller (Southbridge part of the chipset) on your motherboard.

 

"in relation to Gigabyte boards" makes no sense in this context because you have AMD hardware and they're discussing Intel/Sandy Bridge/Z68 etc.

 

You most likely need a 3rd party driver for your SATA controller.

 

I suggest you start here: http://www.insanelym...or-root-device/



#3
TheParadox

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Thats incredibly helpful.  I have a VIA chipset.  I just opened the case and unplugged a card reader. but according to gigabytes website the SB is an AMD SB950



#4
TheParadox

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Looks like there is no kext for that... and I'm out of luck.  well at least I know.



#5
Gringo Vermelho

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According to your motherboard's support page your board has a Marvell 9172 controller and the SB950 Southbridge.

Even with no specific driver available, I guess both should work with OS X but will be listed as "Generic" in System Information.

 

Plug your OS X hard drive into a port that belongs to the SB950. You can look up which ports belong to which controller in your motherboard manual.

 

Try this boot CD http://www.osx86.net..._x_boot_cd.html with a Snow Leopard retail DVD.



#6
TheParadox

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I don't have a CDVD drive, but plan on getting one as it seems more and more I need one.  I'll try that boot CD from a USB (but it probably won't work)... and try the retail version sometime soon.  I thought retail installs would be harder than distros.  are retails more compatitible?



#7
Gringo Vermelho

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In a way yes - with a retail installation you're in total control of what gets patched and modified. This makes troubleshooting a lot easier. Of course, for this approach to be effective you need to do a lot of research about your hardware first. It also helps to be familiar with OS X already.

 

With distros that are pre-patched to work on a variety of PCs, you never know what you can remove/replace or which modifications were made to OS X during install, besides the ones you selected yourself. Even if you know what the patches do it's still a house of cards. You may be making it worse yourself, selecting incorrect or conflicting patches during the customization phase. Also distro-makers can't test everything, there might be bugs or combination of things selected during customization that cause something that should work in theory to not work at all.

 

So, if you look at it this way, you're dealing with many more "unknowns" when installing a distro than when installing retail.







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