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Are Macs Really Better for Digital Photography, Compared to a Windows Build?


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#1
edub2020

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Realise i might get burnt with this question, but i'm trying to gather knowledge to make an informed decision... so here goes.

Mac Vs Windows
I'm confused. Wondering if I can gauge the community opinion please.

I'm looking to invest in next PC, but want to get something that best compliments my wife's new business (Digital Photography).

It turns out that virtually every arty-type photographer on the planet has decided to go for an Apple product.

The thing I don't understand is why?!

On paper, it seems that if you go for an Apple product it looks like you pay double the price for a lower spec machine (compared to a windows self build).

Is there really some hidden magic in Apple products that make them better for photography etc, or is it just maketing genius?

Thanks

#2
bigeasy

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I'm not into digital photography myself but there is obviously a good reason why macs are the tool of choice for image editing. My sister is into digital photography and asked me to turn her laptop into a mac (I'm typing on it now :-) ) She has just finished college and they used macs for photography. When I was a technician at a different college I was in charge of the photography rooms which were all macs too but the rest of the college used windows pc's.

#3
edub2020

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I'm not into digital photography myself but there is obviously a good reason why macs are the tool of choice for image editing. My sister is into digital photography and asked me to turn her laptop into a mac (I'm typing on it now :-) ) She has just finished college and they used macs for photography. When I was a technician at a different college I was in charge of the photography rooms which were all macs too but the rest of the college used windows pc's.


Thanks for taking the time to respond.

#4
kokousic

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Thanks for taking the time to respond.

On macs you could import raw photos directly. On windows it is complicated but also possible. And also their display quality is better in my opinion. But performance wise windows 7 is equal to OS X.

#5
bonestonne

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Mac is no better for Digital Photography than Windows is.

When I put my memory card into my Win 7 laptop and open up Photoshop (or GIMP), I have no problems using it. Same goes for my MacBook Pro. The two machines are nearly identical, but the Toshiba laptop has a sub-par screen to me (although that's out of personal preference).

Even working with RAW images, if you have the software to open the file, it doesn't matter what OS you use.

I prefer using Windows 7 at this point, but Final Cut Pro isn't made for Windows. If you're buying a Mac, I should only hope it's capable of helping you make back the money it cost to buy, because my $2350 didn't grow on a tree, and neither did this laptop. That said however, I didn't buy the cheap one either.

I bought this laptop for the hardware inside, not the OS. i7, 8gb RAM, 750gb drive, 15" hi-res screen...things I couldn't get on a similar spec windows laptop. Specifically the screen. At 1680x1050, it's hard to say even a 17" Windows laptop would compare. Most screens going at 1440x900 drive me nuts. Matte finish was also a must have.

Either way, I have a Windows/Linux based desktop that's equally powerful to my MacBook Pro, so having the portability is nice, but I could live without as well.

#6
Timdphotos

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I bought this laptop for the hardware inside, not the OS. i7, 8gb RAM, 750gb drive, 15" hi-res screen...things I couldn't get on a similar spec windows laptop. Specifically the screen. At 1680x1050, it's hard to say even a 17" Windows laptop would compare. Most screens going at 1440x900 drive me nuts. Matte finish was also a must have.


I totally agree about the screen, got my new MBP a week ago, the high res screen is just so helpful for Photo editing and web design, my old 13" just left no room to view the photos.

About the OS though, both OS will do the job fine, I would worry more about the power of the system, especially with large images/multiple layers etc. It begins to take a real toll on lower spec systems.

#7
clark369

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it's maybe a little trite- but when you're working in a field which is the manifestation of aesthetics, then working on something pretty really does help you enjoy what you do. You would be dubious about getting a haircut from someone with **** hair, so I feel more creative and inspired working on a nice looking, and well build laptop with such a streamlined OS

also functionally being able to view RAW files straight from the finder saves you having to import them into lightroom/photoshop before you can see them. I think windows 7 is still not allowing this feature, at least you can't quick look the files- In fact quick look is enough to stay on OSX anyway

but whether I prefer osx or not, as a designer there was no other option- the industry just lives on OSX so you have to know it and be compatible with it



also you can't just take a macbook and compare it spec for spec with a dell- the magnesium casing, backlit keys, better keyboard, battery life and quality of track pad are worlds apart from a cheap windows laptop, compare the macbook to a top of the range vaio and the price difference disappears
also regardless of price I just wanted a mac, same way as I wanted levi jeans rather than a £4 pair from TK maxx

#8
IT recycling

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It's not just the aesthetics that add to the experience, but the Operating System as well. I've tried using my kit along side a windows based computer and it's, I wouldn't say impossible, but a pain in the proverbial backside. Running an EOS 10D and EOS 300, I can simply USB them accross and grab the images from the camera. On a PC, you need software specific to each camera you use. I can import RAW images into a Mac without any additional software and configure it for printing in different ways. I can set my screen for any profile I like, adjusting for Adobe callibration, RGB etc without any additional software. I can colour match my Mac straight out of the box. I certainly can't do that on a PC to the extent that I can on my Mac.

As for aesthetics, heck, let the company sell the dream- after all it works and the kit does look great in a design studio.

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#9
ameris cyning

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The OS does not matter, its the software applications that are important.

#10
Matty0

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the honest answer to is mac better than windows for photo editing is no. it is not better, but also it is not worse.

without sounding to vague, its the artist that makes the masterpiece, not the paint brush. the tools you need for good photo editing are identical on both mac and windows.

as far as software goes, its no shock that Photoshop is arguably best, and its available for mac and windows.

for plug-ins, these are user subjective and many are mac-only, and many are win-only so this dosent sway the argument in either direction.

for hardware you'l need the same 5 things on windows or mac,

Fast GPU
Fast CPU
Plenty of RAM
Hi-Res monitor (arguable that mac wins here as almost all its monitors are hi-res... but you can always buy new screens for windows pc's... and you can get hi-res windows laptops too)
(optional) a tablet for artwork.

once you have these components in place and the software installed, win or mac you can do the same work. personally (and i imagine this will be a popular view on this forum) i prefer mac. i like doing the work wherever i get the inspiration and my MBP is always with me so its like a comfy slipper. but in terms of facilities, its a dead heat.

#11
ampm

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I have been using both MAC and PC for 10 years now on a daily basis. Honestly both will do the job.

I personally prefer MAC as i find it more stable never had the OS crash on me while working. Can't say the same for WN. The user experience is definitely more sleek under MAC. I find WIN a bit distracting.

If you can spare the cash, go for the MAC otherwise start with a PC and build from there.

#12
kellis

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I have been using both MAC and PC for 10 years now on a daily basis. Honestly both will do the job.

I personally prefer MAC as i find it more stable never had the OS crash on me while working. Can't say the same for WN. The user experience is definitely more sleek under MAC. I find WIN a bit distracting.

If you can spare the cash, go for the MAC otherwise start with a PC and build from there.


both will do the job, yes. any computer will.
camera raw works very well from the GUI/desktop, so you know from the get go what you'r working with.
Then the quality of the displays, to me is pretty big. already calibrated makes a diff.
Software like Portraiture or Adobe Lightroom are pretty sweet.

#13
lordosiris

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You just can't answer this question. There is no right answer.

For example, is a car from Audi really better than one from BMW? If they have the same level of motorisation & equip.?
No, depends on the owner.

You have the Adobe tools and they can run on both, Windows and Mac. You can fail working with both.

So, depends on how much the time you invest to get to know your System and the best tools, to keep an overview on your images!





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