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can i read/write in osx partitions?


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#1
xpertvision

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i need to copy files from linux to osx partitions i have tried everything but no sucess :)

i need some help


thanks

#2
Alessandro17

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Very simple: use a partition that both can read and write: FAT32 and use it as a "go between".
It can be a partition of your PC, a USB Pen Drive or an external HDD.

#3
xpertvision

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i discovered a better option by myself

ubuntu 10.10 for example reads osx partitions but doenst write , i discovered is becouse user permitions

if i use nautilus in SUDO mode i can write in osx partitions :D

example open console and type:

sudo nautilus

now you can read/write in osx partitions (non-journaled only)

#4
Alessandro17

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now you can read/write in osx partitions (non-journaled only)


Indeed, that is the problem. But there is more to that:

http://raamdev.com/m...ccess-in-debian

#5
srs5694

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i discovered a better option by myself

ubuntu 10.10 for example reads osx partitions but doenst write , i discovered is becouse user permitions

if i use nautilus in SUDO mode i can write in osx partitions :)


That is a VERY VERY DANGEROUS approach! I STRONGLY advise against it! The problem is two-fold. First, you're running the Nautilus file manager as root, which means that you can do immense damage to Linux and/or OS X by a sloppy mistake, such as clicking the wrong confirmation button, dragging files to the wrong location, etc. Second, when you copy files and create subdirectories, they'll probably be owned by root, which means you may need root access to make further changes, which means you'll be creating a requirement for yet more root access, thus increasing future risks.

Instead, you should synchronize your user ID (UID) numbers, and perhaps your group ID (GID) numbers, across Linux and OS X. This can be done with the usermod command in Linux, along with a chown command to change ownership of your regular files:

sudo usermod -u 501 yourusername
sudo chown -R 501 /home/yourusername

It's conceivable you'll need to log out and back in again between those commands. (In fact, this is best done via a direct root login, but Ubuntu disables this type of access by default.) You may need to adjust the UID value (501 here) to something else, depending on what you use in OS X. You will obviously also need to change "yourusername" to something appropriate.

When this is done, you should be able to read and write all the same directories on your HFS+ partition(s) in both OSes from a regular login, without using a dangerous sudo operation every time.

#6
Alessandro17

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Ubuntu disables this type of access by default.


$ sudo passwd root





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